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By Tom Peters | September 24, 1990
For about 18 months, I have been exercising regularly -- walking fast, variously called "aerobic walking" or "speed walking." When I started I could barely manage 1.25 miles at 14.5 minutes per mile; I did this about four times a week. Today I average five miles at 11.25 minutes, six or seven times a week. The latter numbers reflect a breakthrough that occurred during a recent vacation in the French Alps; examining its origins provides lessons for managers.I arrived in France determined not to let my walking habit slip; but I was panicky because our rented house was up about 5,500 feet.
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By KEVIN COWHERD | September 25, 2006
Over the years, I've run into just about every kind of beverage snob you could run into. I've run into wine snobs, who seem to drink the stuff just so they can prattle on and on about its bouquet and complexity and bore the hell out of everyone. I've run into beer snobs who only buy the hottest microbrew and look down on anyone drinking a Bud or Heineken as the Great Unwashed. I've run into coffee snobs who have to pay five bucks for an Arabian Mocha Sanani at the designer coffee emporiums to be spiritually fulfilled, and when you mention getting a cup of Folgers at the diner, they scrunch up their faces and make gagging sounds.
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NEWS
December 18, 1999
Roger Frison-Roche, 93, an avid mountaineer and writer who made the first live radio broadcast from the summit of Mont Blanc, has died in Chamonix in the French Alps. Mr. Frison-Roche fell into a coma on Thursday and died overnight.Frances Patzman, who at age 110 was older than her home state, died in Bismarck, N.D., on Wednesday.Ian Pierre Watt, 82, a literary critic and former prisoner of war at the infamous Japanese camp on the River Kwai, died Monday in Stanford, Calif.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
A Memorable Place Overnight in the desert of Egypt By Nicole Feliciano SPECIAL TO THE SUN My husband and I went to Egypt last July to visit a friend studying at the American University in Cairo. My college pal was fluent in Arabic, and promised to be an excellent guide for our first visit to the Middle East. We were not disappointed in either the country or my friend's abilities as a host. Cairo is dense with cultural attractions. We spent our days touring mosques, museums and forts.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 22, 2003
We are worried, here in the newspaper business (motto: "What, YOU never make mistakes?"). We're hearing that you readers have lost your faith in us. Polls show that, in terms of public trust, the news media now rank lower than used-car salespeople, kidnappers, tapeworms, Hitler, and airline flight announcements. (We are still slightly ahead of lawyers.) Of course, these poll results were reported by the news media, so they could be wrong. In fact, there might not actually have been any polls; it's possible that some reporter made the whole "media credibility" story up. But I don't think so. I think the public is genuinely unhappy with us. Lately, when I tell people I work for a newspaper, I've detected the subtle signs of disapproval - the dirty looks; the snide remarks; the severed animal heads in my bed. How did we get into this situation?
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 25, 2006
Over the years, I've run into just about every kind of beverage snob you could run into. I've run into wine snobs, who seem to drink the stuff just so they can prattle on and on about its bouquet and complexity and bore the hell out of everyone. I've run into beer snobs who only buy the hottest microbrew and look down on anyone drinking a Bud or Heineken as the Great Unwashed. I've run into coffee snobs who have to pay five bucks for an Arabian Mocha Sanani at the designer coffee emporiums to be spiritually fulfilled, and when you mention getting a cup of Folgers at the diner, they scrunch up their faces and make gagging sounds.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
A Memorable Place Overnight in the desert of Egypt By Nicole Feliciano SPECIAL TO THE SUN My husband and I went to Egypt last July to visit a friend studying at the American University in Cairo. My college pal was fluent in Arabic, and promised to be an excellent guide for our first visit to the Middle East. We were not disappointed in either the country or my friend's abilities as a host. Cairo is dense with cultural attractions. We spent our days touring mosques, museums and forts.
SPORTS
July 27, 2006
Michelle Wie knows it's tough keeping up with the best men in the game. In the French Alps yesterday, she learned that beating golf's top female money winner this season - Mexico's Lorena Ochoa - won't be much easier. Ochoa, Mi Hyun Kim and Shani Waugh shot 6-under-par 66 to lead the Evian Masters, where temperatures reached an unseasonable 91 degrees. Ochoa birdied seven holes but bogeyed the 15th for her 66. "I hit it close today and did not have that many long putts," said Ochoa, the runner-up with Wie a year ago when Paula Creamer won the tournament.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | May 8, 1996
Bottle's different, but Evian's the sameFor the first time in 16 years, the familiar bottle of Evian spring water has undergone a remake. The new bottle was designed to use less plastic and to be easily crushed to save recycling storage space. It has a sculpted surface that represents the French Alps and the aquifer where the water originates.Child, MPT win awardJulia Child's "In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs," co-produced by Maryland Public Television and A La Carte Communications of Guilford, Conn.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | May 19, 1991
For Americans, the opportunity to combine European travel and the Olympics won't get any better than 1992, when the winter games will be held in the French Alps and the summer games in Barcelona, Spain.It will be the last year in which both the summer and winter games are staged the same year. The winter games then will move to the alternate biennials, starting in 1994 in Lillehammer, Norway. The next stop for the summer games will be in Atlanta in 1996.Both the French Alps and the Mediterranean seaport of Barcelona are tourist destinations of their own; the addition of the Olympic Games either adds to their lure or detracts from it, depending on your affinity for competition and congestion.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 22, 2003
We are worried, here in the newspaper business (motto: "What, YOU never make mistakes?"). We're hearing that you readers have lost your faith in us. Polls show that, in terms of public trust, the news media now rank lower than used-car salespeople, kidnappers, tapeworms, Hitler, and airline flight announcements. (We are still slightly ahead of lawyers.) Of course, these poll results were reported by the news media, so they could be wrong. In fact, there might not actually have been any polls; it's possible that some reporter made the whole "media credibility" story up. But I don't think so. I think the public is genuinely unhappy with us. Lately, when I tell people I work for a newspaper, I've detected the subtle signs of disapproval - the dirty looks; the snide remarks; the severed animal heads in my bed. How did we get into this situation?
NEWS
December 18, 1999
Roger Frison-Roche, 93, an avid mountaineer and writer who made the first live radio broadcast from the summit of Mont Blanc, has died in Chamonix in the French Alps. Mr. Frison-Roche fell into a coma on Thursday and died overnight.Frances Patzman, who at age 110 was older than her home state, died in Bismarck, N.D., on Wednesday.Ian Pierre Watt, 82, a literary critic and former prisoner of war at the infamous Japanese camp on the River Kwai, died Monday in Stanford, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Tom Peters | September 24, 1990
For about 18 months, I have been exercising regularly -- walking fast, variously called "aerobic walking" or "speed walking." When I started I could barely manage 1.25 miles at 14.5 minutes per mile; I did this about four times a week. Today I average five miles at 11.25 minutes, six or seven times a week. The latter numbers reflect a breakthrough that occurred during a recent vacation in the French Alps; examining its origins provides lessons for managers.I arrived in France determined not to let my walking habit slip; but I was panicky because our rented house was up about 5,500 feet.
SPORTS
December 27, 1991
Kansas State coach not seeking new jobKansas State football coach Bill Snyder said last night that he will remain at the school and is not a candidate for either the Maryland job or University of Minnesota job, according to a spokesman at Kansas State.Ben Boyle, Kansas State sports information director, said he spoke with Snyder last night after an Associated Press story had said Snyder was a candidate for the Minnesota job."Bill told me that he is not interested in the Minnesota job, the Maryland job or any other job that comes along," Boyle said.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 31, 1997
Andre Techine's "Thieves," which opens today at the Charles, has all the high-toned marks of the European art movie -- wintry landscapes, severe photography, piano music and chapters. But it's got some low pleasures as well: gunfights, hot sex in cheap hotel rooms, tough cops and criminal masterminds.Walking, as it does, both high roads and low, the film is simultaneously dour and fascinating. It's a crime movie like none I've ever seen, less concerned with the mechanics of the criminal act than with the general pall of anxiety that comes with the criminal lifestyle.
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