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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 14, 1990
The piano is really a huge percussion box in which sounds are made by hammers striking steel strung under thousands of pounds of pressure. Beautiful sounds should not be able to come out of such an instrument, and, in fact, they rarely do -- even when played by some very famous pianists.In terms of popular acclaim, Nelson Freire is not a very famous pianist. But last night the Brazilian-born artist made some of the most beautiful sounds this listener has ever heard come out of a piano.With the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor James DePreist, Freire gave an extraordinarily poetic and personal performance of the beloved Schumann Concerto.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
His name may not register with concert-goers as quickly as some others, but Nelson Freire is easily recognized as one of the most respected pianists on the world scene. Without a hint of showiness or artificial attitude, Freire invariably brings a sterling technique and stylistic authority to the keyboard, as he did in a recital Sunday evening for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The pianist established at the outset, in the Siloti arrangement of Bach's G minor Organ Prelude, that the tone would be warm and richly colored all night, that the phrasing would speak eloquently.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 30, 1992
Nelson Freire, one of the greatest living pianists, will perform four of the most beloved concertos in the standard repertory as the highlight of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's seventh annual Summerfest series in July.The BSO announced yesterday that music director David Zinman will join forces with the French-based, Brazilian-born Freire, to perform Brahms' First and Second Concertos (July 9 and 11) and Rachmaninov's Second and Third (July 14 and 16). The 47-year-old pianist, who has delighted audiences here in recent years with his Schumann and Beethoven concertos, is only now beginning to acquire the popular fame he deserves on this side of the Atlantic.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
JUPITER, Fla. -- A throwing error by first baseman Alejandro Freire helped Florida to a two-run eighth inning yesterday that gave the Marlins a 5-4 victory over the Orioles before 3,051 at Roger Dean Stadium. The Orioles had taken a 4-3 lead in the top of the eighth on Brandon Marsters' RBI double and Napoleon Calzado's run-scoring single. Calzado, Kevin Millar and Ed Rogers all had two hits for the Orioles, who lost to the Marlins, 6-4, in their exhibition opener Thursday. Dodgers vs. Orioles Fort Lauderdale, Fla., today, 1:05 p.m. Radio: 1090 AM
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 8, 1995
Liszt, Piano Concertos Nos. 1 and 2, "Totentanz," performed by Nelson Freire and the Dresden Philharmonic, Michel Plasson conducting (Berlin Classics 0011302BC); Liszt, "Totentanz," excerpts from Book I of the "Annees de Pelinerage," Hungarian Rhapsodies Nos. 17 and 18, and the Polonaise in C Minor, performed by Grigori Ginzburg and (in the "Totentanz") the All Union Radio Symphony Orchestra, Nikolai Anosov conducting (Arlecchino 141)Arthur Rubinstein remarked that "People think a pianist needs technique to play Liszt and musicianship to play Brahms when actually it's quite the reverse."
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 29, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, concluded what may have been its best Summerfest series ever Saturday with the best concert of the festival. The chief reason was an extraordinary Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto" that featured the pianist Nelson Freire.In the opinion of many piano aficionados -- including this writer -- Freire is the undisputed heir to the late Arthur Rubinstein. There is the same physical beauty of the playing -- gorgeous tone from top to bottom at all dynamic levels -- and a kind of technique that makes playing the piano seem as natural and as easy as breathing.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 13, 1990
If the movie "Diva," had been made about a thrilling but reclusive pianist instead of a singer, Nelson Freire could have been the star. That is not just because the bearded, compactly handsome pianist is good-looking enough for movies, but because he is as shy as his playing is extroverted."
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
THE MEYERHOFF Symphony Hall served up several treats last night. Get yourself there by 8:15 p.m. tonight if you'd like to hear piano or drum dramatics and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in sharp form.Sheer piano excitement the old-fashioned way came in the firm fingers of the Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire playing Robert Schumann's Romantic "Piano Concerto in A Minor" (1846). Accompanying him, the BSO -- under James DePreist -- continued its winning ways with Schumann after producing a marvelous CD of his first and fourth symphonies this year.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 27, 1992
What I remember best about the year now ending are two very different performances of Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3. The soloist in the first was Alexander Toradze, in his performance of the piece last winter with the Baltimore Symphony; the second was Nelson Freire in his interpretation with the same orchestra in July.Each was unforgettable because they were among the best performances I have heard in more than 30 years of listening to what in some ways is my favorite piece of music.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 14, 2002
Nelson Freire sits patiently at the piano on the stage of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, waiting to begin a rehearsal for this week's concerts. As guest conductor Michiyoshi Inoue discusses a few things with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Freire's fingers do a kind of limbering-up exercise - rapid scales up and down the keyboard, without actually depressing the keys. Although not a sound comes from the piano during this shadow-playing, you can almost hear the artistry, the way you can imagine hearing a great silent-film actor's lines just by the expressions on his face.
SPORTS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | October 7, 2005
Second baseman Bernie Castro, first baseman Alejandro Freire, outfielder Ramon Nivar, outfielder Keith Reed and shortstop Eddie Rogers have cleared waivers and have been sent outright to Triple-A Ottawa. Rogers has elected to become a free agent, while the other four players will become minor league free agents on October 15. Rogers, whose contract was purchased from Ottawa on September 6, hit a home run in his only at bat for the Orioles on September 26 against New York. He also pinch-ran in 7 games, his first major league appearances since 2002.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
BOSTON - The elements that go into winning a game at Fenway Park as the visiting team are becoming more complicated, and they don't usually include a rookie pitcher. The heavy lifting is supposed to be done by experienced hands, not ones that might begin to shake. Exposed to hostile surroundings for the first time in the majors, John Maine went five innings and left with a one-run lead, and Alejandro Freire hit his first homer in the Orioles' 7-3 victory over the Boston Red Sox last night before 35,156.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
For years, Alejandro Freire did all the things you're supposed to do if you want to make the big leagues. He hit for power, he hit for average, and everywhere he went, he worked hard. But for some reason, there never seemed to be a permanent place for him. He bounced around, with stops in Houston, Detroit and San Francisco, until one day, no one was very interested in a 30-year-old first baseman with no major league experience. He spent most of last season playing for Veracruz in the Mexican League, wondering if his chance had passed him by. One person who never gave up on Freire, however, was Melvin Mora.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2005
The Orioles may have only been on the road for a week, but by the time they returned home yesterday, they looked, in some corners of the clubhouse, like a completely different team. Not only did the club have a new manager and a new first base coach, it also put pitcher Sidney Ponson (strained right calf) and outfielder B.J. Surhoff (strained left groin) on the disabled list and optioned reliever Chris Ray to the minors. To take their place, the Orioles called up pitcher Eric DuBose from Double-A Bowie, as well two players from Triple-A Ottawa: first baseman Alejandro Freire and pitcher Aaron Rakers.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2005
Bowie Baysox pitcher Hayden Penn and the Ottawa Lynx's Alejandro Freire and Frederick Keys' Mario Delgado -- both first basemen/designated hitters -- were honored last week for their performances in April. Penn received the Orioles organization's Minor League Pitcher of the Month Award; Freire was named the Orioles' Minor League Player of the Month; and Delgado was honored as Carolina League Player of the Month. "Hayden has been outstanding, commanding three pitches [fastball, slider and changeup]
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 22, 2005
Baltimore will witness an extraordinary parade of keyboard talent over the next several weeks, including such younger generation stars as Evgeny Kissin, Lang Lang and Yundi Li, not to mention distinguished veteran Elisso Virsaladze, the dynamic Christopher O'Riley and the up-and-coming Alexandre Tharaud. They'll all have to compete with memories of a recital played Sunday evening for the Shriver Hall Concert Series by Nelson Freire. He isn't the best known or most recorded, and certainly not the most hyped pianist around, just one of the most innately gifted.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2005
For years, Alejandro Freire did all the things you're supposed to do if you want to make the big leagues. He hit for power, he hit for average, and everywhere he went, he worked hard. But for some reason, there never seemed to be a permanent place for him. He bounced around, with stops in Houston, Detroit and San Francisco, until one day, no one was very interested in a 30-year-old first baseman with no major league experience. He spent most of last season playing for Veracruz in the Mexican League, wondering if his chance had passed him by. One person who never gave up on Freire, however, was Melvin Mora.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2002
SAARBRUCKEN, Germany - Oscar Freire of Spain rocketed ahead of the pack just before the end to claim Stage 2 of the Tour de France yesterday, but the sentimental winner of the day was a Norwegian rider who struggled home in last place. After days of cool, damp weather, riders sweltered in 90-degree temperatures for much of yesterday's 112.2-mile stage. Thor Hushovd of the Credit Agricole team was in the lead group at the 70-mile mark when his right leg cramped and he was forced to call for a quick massage.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2002
SAARBRUCKEN, Germany - Oscar Freire of Spain rocketed ahead of the pack just before the end to claim Stage 2 of the Tour de France yesterday, but the sentimental winner of the day was a Norwegian rider who struggled home in last place. After days of cool, damp weather, riders sweltered in 90-degree temperatures for much of yesterday's 112.2-mile stage. Thor Hushovd of the Credit Agricole team was in the lead group at the 70-mile mark when his right leg cramped and he was forced to call for a quick massage.
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