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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1996
The county will pay $35,000 to test a nationally known consultant's plan for growth management.The County Commissioners agreed yesterday to hire, for a seven-week period, Dr. Robert H. Freilich, an attorney and planning expert who has worked successfully in other Maryland counties.Dr. Freilich and two associates will work closely with county planners to draft interim development controls by March 31. Those controls could include a 20-month ban on new subdivision approvals. During the trial period, Dr. Freilich, who is based in Kansas City, Mo., will travel frequently to Westminster to work with county planners.
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NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2004
An Aberdeen physician is suing Harford Memorial Hospital and its owner, Upper Chesapeake Health Inc., in a dispute over the hospital's refusal to reaccredit her for medical staff privileges there. Dr. Linda Freilich, a board-certified kidney specialist and internist with offices in Bel Air, first filed a federal lawsuit against the hospital in December 2000. She lost the federal case on appeal in December 2002. She filed a state suit in April last year. In both suits, Freilich alleged that the hospital's decision not to reaccredit her was made in retaliation to her complaints about the care her patients received at Harford Memorial.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
The County Commissioners and the author of a proposed interim development-control ordinance, a nationally known growth expert, worked yesterday on ironing out kinks in the measure.They could do little to combat what Robert H. Freilich called the expected "whiplash" he has received from developers, builders and real estate agents who fear the ordinance would stymie business."Homebuilders and Realtors are an important economic aspect to this community," said Dr. Freilich, a law professor at the University of Missouri and chairman of the American Planners Association.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
In a high-stakes battle over development in the Green Spring Valley, the developers of a proposed office complex on Falls Road accused a Baltimore County councilman yesterday of blocking the project in exchange for a campaign contribution. Lawyers for the owners of Greenspring Racquet Club alleged in Baltimore County Circuit Court that Councilman T. Bryan McIntire accepted a $3,000 campaign contribution from an "ardent opponent" of the project a few months before he introduced a measure that killed it. Robert H. Freilich, a lawyer for William and Loretta Hirshfeld, told Judge John F. Fader II that the contribution June 19, 1998, was made by J. Patrick Mullan, whose Lutherville real estate company they called an "economic competitor."
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2004
An Aberdeen physician is suing Harford Memorial Hospital and its owner, Upper Chesapeake Health Inc., in a dispute over the hospital's refusal to reaccredit her for medical staff privileges there. Dr. Linda Freilich, a board-certified kidney specialist and internist with offices in Bel Air, first filed a federal lawsuit against the hospital in December 2000. She lost the federal case on appeal in December 2002. She filed a state suit in April last year. In both suits, Freilich alleged that the hospital's decision not to reaccredit her was made in retaliation to her complaints about the care her patients received at Harford Memorial.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
A growth-management expert is calling for a 20-month ban on approving new building permits to give the county time to rework its master plan and get control of residential growth that has nearly tripled Carroll's population in 30 years.Robert H. Freilich, law professor at the University of Missouri and chairman of the planning and law division of the American Planning Institute, laid out the proposal for county and municipal officials in a two-day seminar in Westminster Thursday and Friday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff | March 21, 1996
The County Commissioners ironed out the kinks in a proposed interim development control ordinance yesterday with its author, a nationally known growth expert.They could do little to repair what Dr. Robert H. Freilich called the expected "whiplash" he has received from developers, builders and real estate agents who fear the ordinance will stymie business."Homebuilders and Realtors are an important economic aspect to this community," said Dr. Freilich, a law professor at the University of Missouri and chairman of the American Planners Association.
NEWS
January 31, 1996
NOW THAT Carroll County officials have heard from Robert Freilich, a nationally recognized growth management expert, they have to decide whether to take his advice. The decision to enact some -- or all -- of his recommendations will be the litmus test of how serious Carroll's commissioners are about controlling the county's run-away residential growth.For a county that has regularly ignored the consequences of growth during the past three decades, Mr. Freilich's prescriptions may appear to be Draconian.
NEWS
February 2, 1996
BEFORE THE Carroll County commissioners pay $250,000 to land-use guru Robert Freilich to develop a growth management plan, they ought to develop the political consensus that will be absolutely necessary to really control Carroll's residential development. Otherwise, the county might spend a tremendous amount of money to create a growth strategy that would never get enacted.During his recent two-day presentation to county leaders and residents, Mr. Freilich, of Kansas City, outlined in very broad strokes the shortcomings of the county's current approach to development and outlined some remedies.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1996
The gulf between the Board of County Commissioners and the building industry over a proposed 18-month ban on new subdivisions appeared to grow wider yesterday.Developers and others arrived for a 9 a.m. meeting at the Bear Branch Nature Center, ready with a two-hour presentation of alternatives to the ban that builders say would put many of them out of business. They quickly discovered they had been allotted 30 minutes to make their case.As Commissioner Richard W. Yates got up to leave at 9: 48 a.m., Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown informed the business group of the 9: 30 a.m. cutoff.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1996
The gulf between the Board of County Commissioners and the building industry over a proposed 18-month ban on new subdivisions appeared to grow wider yesterday.Developers and others arrived for a 9 a.m. meeting at the Bear Branch Nature Center, ready with a two-hour presentation of alternatives to the ban that builders say would put many of them out of business. They quickly discovered they had been allotted 30 minutes to make their case.As Commissioner Richard W. Yates got up to leave at 9: 48 a.m., Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown informed the business group of the 9: 30 a.m. cutoff.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
The County Commissioners and the author of a proposed interim development-control ordinance, a nationally known growth expert, worked yesterday on ironing out kinks in the measure.They could do little to combat what Robert H. Freilich called the expected "whiplash" he has received from developers, builders and real estate agents who fear the ordinance would stymie business."Homebuilders and Realtors are an important economic aspect to this community," said Dr. Freilich, a law professor at the University of Missouri and chairman of the American Planners Association.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff | March 21, 1996
The County Commissioners ironed out the kinks in a proposed interim development control ordinance yesterday with its author, a nationally known growth expert.They could do little to repair what Dr. Robert H. Freilich called the expected "whiplash" he has received from developers, builders and real estate agents who fear the ordinance will stymie business."Homebuilders and Realtors are an important economic aspect to this community," said Dr. Freilich, a law professor at the University of Missouri and chairman of the American Planners Association.
NEWS
February 18, 1996
Freilich cites inaccuracies; his critics complainFollowing my visit to Carroll County on Jan. 25-26, newspaper articles and an editorial in The Sun for Carroll indicated that I had recommended a 20-month total ban (moratorium) on the issuance of building permits and on subdivision approval to give the county time to undertake its master plan update.The Sun's report is not accurate.Interim development controls ("IDC"), as distinguished from moratoria and which I recommended, are a well-recognized planning tool designed to protect the plan during its formative period.
NEWS
February 13, 1996
James Edward Roper, 69, grocery store ownerJames Edward Roper, retired owner of a Northwest Baltimore grocery store, died Feb. 6 at Liberty Medical Center after suffering a heart attack at his Pimlico home. He was 69.Born in Evergreen, Ala., and raised there and in Cincinnati, he came to Baltimore in 1950. Here he met his wife, Doris L. Thomas of North Carolina, whom he married in 1951.After working for a time for a railroad and then as a stock clerk, in 1963 he opened a small grocery store, Roper's on Edmondson Avenue.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1996
The county will pay $35,000 to test a nationally known consultant's plan for growth management.The County Commissioners agreed yesterday to hire, for a seven-week period, Dr. Robert H. Freilich, an attorney and planning expert who has worked successfully in other Maryland counties.Dr. Freilich and two associates will work closely with county planners to draft interim development controls by March 31. Those controls could include a 20-month ban on new subdivision approvals. During the trial period, Dr. Freilich, who is based in Kansas City, Mo., will travel frequently to Westminster to work with county planners.
NEWS
February 13, 1996
James Edward Roper, 69, grocery store ownerJames Edward Roper, retired owner of a Northwest Baltimore grocery store, died Feb. 6 at Liberty Medical Center after suffering a heart attack at his Pimlico home. He was 69.Born in Evergreen, Ala., and raised there and in Cincinnati, he came to Baltimore in 1950. Here he met his wife, Doris L. Thomas of North Carolina, whom he married in 1951.After working for a time for a railroad and then as a stock clerk, in 1963 he opened a small grocery store, Roper's on Edmondson Avenue.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
In a high-stakes battle over development in the Green Spring Valley, the developers of a proposed office complex on Falls Road accused a Baltimore County councilman yesterday of blocking the project in exchange for a campaign contribution. Lawyers for the owners of Greenspring Racquet Club alleged in Baltimore County Circuit Court that Councilman T. Bryan McIntire accepted a $3,000 campaign contribution from an "ardent opponent" of the project a few months before he introduced a measure that killed it. Robert H. Freilich, a lawyer for William and Loretta Hirshfeld, told Judge John F. Fader II that the contribution June 19, 1998, was made by J. Patrick Mullan, whose Lutherville real estate company they called an "economic competitor."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
After years of piecemeal planning and zoning decisions spurred by a population that has grown by 20,000 since 1990, Carroll County is taking a comprehensive look at controlling development.Already in the works is a series of brainstorming sessions for planning professionals, business leaders and residents to try to reach consensus on revising the master plan, the county's blueprint for growth. And the County Commissioners are considering further use of a nationally recognized planning expert as a consultant to help sort it all out.The commissioners are scheduled to review a preliminary report from Dr. Robert H. Freilich this week.
NEWS
February 2, 1996
BEFORE THE Carroll County commissioners pay $250,000 to land-use guru Robert Freilich to develop a growth management plan, they ought to develop the political consensus that will be absolutely necessary to really control Carroll's residential development. Otherwise, the county might spend a tremendous amount of money to create a growth strategy that would never get enacted.During his recent two-day presentation to county leaders and residents, Mr. Freilich, of Kansas City, outlined in very broad strokes the shortcomings of the county's current approach to development and outlined some remedies.
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