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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2002
As World War II began to expand in the autumn of 1939, the City of Flint, an outward-bound Baltimore freighter, found herself caught up in two major international wartime incidents. The City of Flint, under the command of Capt. Joseph Gainard, who was well-known in Baltimore maritime circles, was steaming across the Atlantic when her wireless crackled with a call for help from the Donaldson Atlantic Line steamer Athenia. On Sept. 1, 1939, the ship was sailing westward from Ireland, bound for Montreal with 1,103 passengers, of whom 311 were Americans fleeing the impending outbreak of war in Europe.
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By Dick Irwin and Dick Irwin,SUN REPORTER | July 3, 2008
At least six vehicles reported stolen this year in Maryland and on their way to foreign countries by freighter have been recovered by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents, an agency spokesman said this week. Two of the vehicles, a 2000 Nissan Maxima and a 1999 Toyota Camry, were heading to Nigeria and Niger, respectively, Steve Sapp said in a news release. . Sapp said CBP agents at the port of Baltimore routinely review exports to determine whether shipping firms are complying with U.S. export laws.
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FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | July 10, 1994
Q: I heard about a ship that is part freighter and part passenger, that boards passengers in Miami and sails to South America on a regular schedule. Can you give me some information about it?A: I think you mean the Americana. This ship sails as far south as Buenos Aires, Argentina, on a fairly regular schedule, but it recently changed its U.S. ports and no longer stops in Miami.This is no ordinary freighter.The 19,500-ton ship of Ivaran Line, which carries 88 passengers plus freight, now sails from New Orleans and stops at Houston, two ports in Venezuela, Rio de Janeiro and Santos in Brazil, before arriving in Buenos Aires.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
A team of scientists is trying to figure out how a member of a rare species of whale, normally found in the deepest waters of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, ended up dead in the least likely place: Baltimore's urban Patapsco River. The 35-foot sei whale, part of an endangered species related to the blue whale, was found stuck on a torpedo-like bulb protruding from the bow of an 800-foot cargo ship that had traveled from Boston. But scientists don't know whether the ship hit the whale and killed it, or it was already dead when it became wrapped around the bow, said Tricia Kimmel, a biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | November 28, 1992
TILGHMAN ISLAND -- The U.S. Coast Guard is investigatin the grounding on Thanksgiving Day of a Cypriot freighter, which was headed south in the Chesapeake Bay when it struck a muddy shoal near the mouth of the Choptank River.The 750-foot ship was freed with the help of yesterday's 5:30 p.m. high tide and two tugboats from Baltimore. Under its own power, the freighter last night was headed for Norfolk, Va., where it is expected to be checked for damage.The freighter, Katya V, left Baltimore Harbor Thursday with a load of grain bound for Spain.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 15, 1992
Two shipping-company executives who operated the notorious Khian Sea -- the freighter that tried to dump incinerator ash on three continents -- have been indicted in Wilmington, Del., on charges that they lied to a federal grand jury.William P. Reilly, 66, of Severna Park, and John Patrick Dowd, 39, of Washington had told a grand jury sitting in Wilmington that the ash was not dumped at sea.Federal investigators say they determined that the ash was dumped in the Indian Ocean while the ship was traveling between Yugoslavia and Singapore.
NEWS
December 17, 1996
A CHRISTMAS MIRACLE is how folks in New Orleans are referring to the weekend accident at the Riverwalk mall there. To understand why is to see the news photos of the fancy shopping complex, crushed like a soda can by a grain freighter run amok, and to learn that no one was killed even though the collision happened in midday as shoppers lunched and browsed at the height of the holiday season.The scenario was dramatic and horrific: A 70,000-ton grain ship, the Bright Field, as long as two football fields, lost power due to an oil pump failure.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Federal Express Corp. and federal aviation regulators are squaring off over how much cargo certain Boeing Co. 727 freighter planes can safely carry.Last July, the Federal Aviation Administration told FedEx, United Parcel Service and other airlines flying converted Boeing 727s that it intended to reduce their payloads by more than half until changes are made to strengthen the planes' floor decks.The FAA proposed cutting cargo loads to no more than 3,000 pounds from the existing limit of 8,000 pounds per container.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Jeffrey Slaton was the last man on the Swift and the last man off. He wasn't supposed to be on the tugboat that sank Monday morning in the Elk River near the entrance to the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. But the boat needed another deckhand, and he agreed to turn around from a shift on the Essex and start another one on the Swift, with just enough time at home to change clothes. If not for the help of God, Slaton says, he never would have seen home again. On Sunday night, the captain, William "Bo" Bryant, told the crew that a freighter would be passing on the port side the next morning.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown, Scott Calvert and Chris Guy and Lane Harvey Brown, Scott Calvert and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2002
Four members of a tugboat and dredging crew are missing and feared dead in the cold Elk River after the tug collided with a 520-foot freighter yesterday morning in fog 40 miles northeast of Baltimore. Five others from the tug Swift were rescued after narrowly escaping from the sinking vessel. The 60-foot tug rolled and sank within 20 seconds, apparently trapping some men inside, crew members told rescuers. The search for survivors was called off by evening and is scheduled to resume this morning.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN | April 1, 2006
A 43-year-old Baltimore man received a 15 1/2 -year prison sentence yesterday for his role in a drug conspiracy in which prosecutors said 155 kilograms of cocaine was smuggled from South America into Baltimore. U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. sentenced Donald Ryan, who pleaded guilty in January. According to court documents, Ryan agreed in September 2003 to serve as a broker for a freighter shipment of cocaine from Guyana to Savannah, Ga. On Feb. 24, 2004, the freighter containing the cocaine arrived in Savannah's port.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
On most days, he's part of a crew that makes its way along a vast swath of currents in a cargo-filled steel leviathan, and like most seafarers, he helps pacify the world's quenchless appetite for stuff. But on Monday, Philip Salvador found himself on dry land, Baltimore's Fort McHenry Yard, which meant it was once again time to go from missing his wife to searching for what she asked him to bring home. There was no way he could make the request a Christmas present, for Salvador was not due to return to the Philippines until June.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2002
A 36-foot northern right whale found floating off Ocean City this week was the apparent victim of a collision with a ship. The whale's badly decomposed carcass was towed to Assateague National Seashore yesterday morning, where investigators found evidence of severe trauma. "There were concentric propeller wound patterns along the back of the animal. It would have had to be a big screw freighter," said David Schofield, manager of ocean health programs for the National Aquarium in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2002
A week after the fatal collision between a freighter and a flotilla of tugboats and barges on the Elk River, three lawsuits have been filed in federal court by companies involved in the incident. Norfolk Dredging Co. of Chesapeake, Va., has filed two suits, one in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and the other in Norfolk. The suits seek a total of $30 million in damages as a result of the accident, in which the captain of its tugboat Swift and three crewmen died. The suits center around the events leading to the collision Feb. 25 of the freighter A.V. Kastner, owned by Gypsum Transportation, a Bermuda company, and a flotilla of barges, tugs and dredge equipment.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Lane Harvey Brown and Andrew A. Green and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Salvage crews raised yesterday the tugboat that sank on the Elk River last week, and state officials recovered the bodies of two of the four men who were killed in the accident. The bodies of crew members Ronald L. Bonniville, 32, of Hayes, Va., and Clarence McConnell, 47, of McClellanville, S.C., 47, were recovered about 5:20 p.m. from a berth compartment below deck. Two other missing crewmen, Captain William Bryant of Virginia Beach, Va., and his nephew, Justin Bryant of Supply, N.C., made it off the boat but were pulled underwater, according to witnesses.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Jeffrey Slaton was the last man on the Swift and the last man off. He wasn't supposed to be on the tugboat that sank Monday morning in the Elk River near the entrance to the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. But the boat needed another deckhand, and he agreed to turn around from a shift on the Essex and start another one on the Swift, with just enough time at home to change clothes. If not for the help of God, Slaton says, he never would have seen home again. On Sunday night, the captain, William "Bo" Bryant, told the crew that a freighter would be passing on the port side the next morning.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2001
As German forces overran Europe in the spring of 1940, massive gold shipments began arriving in the United States from England, France, the Netherlands, Belgium and Norway for safekeeping. As the May invasion of Oslo began, Norwegian officials played a cat and mouse game with some 600,000,000 kronor, which they successfully managed to spirit away from the Nazis aboard a British troopship and deposit in a London bank vault. The next month, a shipment of gold estimated to be in excess of $500 million arrived in New York from England and France, shipped by way of Canada.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
The body of a man found yesterday floating off a pier in Canton may be that of a freighter crewman who was reported missing Dec. 23. The body was taken to the state medical examiner's office for an autopsy and identification, police said. Detective Dave Peckoo of the homicide unit said a contractor aboard a freighter saw the body about 1 p.m. off Pier 1 in the 2000 block of S. Clinton St. Peckoo said a missing-person report on the crewman had been filed.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2002
Good thing Roy Young dallied a bit while getting ready for bed. He might be a dead man otherwise. Young is one of five known survivors who made a harrowing escape from the tugboat Swift yesterday morning after it collided with a freighter on the fog-shrouded Elk River and sank. In a span of 10 minutes, the 48-year-old Young would rush onto the deck, spot a man going overboard, feel the boat roll, jump into the frigid water, dive as deep as he could and then swim until he could swim no more.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown, Scott Calvert and Chris Guy and Lane Harvey Brown, Scott Calvert and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2002
Four members of a tugboat and dredging crew are missing and feared dead in the cold Elk River after the tug collided with a 520-foot freighter yesterday morning in fog 40 miles northeast of Baltimore. Five others from the tug Swift were rescued after narrowly escaping from the sinking vessel. The 60-foot tug rolled and sank within 20 seconds, apparently trapping some men inside, crew members told rescuers. The search for survivors was called off by evening and is scheduled to resume this morning.
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