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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2001
The usually busy downtown intersection of Howard and Lombard streets, closed since a freight train carrying hazardous chemicals derailed and caught fire under it last month, should reopen by Tuesday, city officials said yesterday. A key stretch of light rail line that was severed by the train fire and a water main break under the intersection should be ready to carry passengers again by Sept. 9, in time for the Ravens' home opener, state officials said. At a legislative briefing on the train fire in Annapolis, city Public Works Director George L. Winfield told the House Commerce and Government Affairs Committee that work on the intersection in the heart of the business district is "about complete," and that he hopes to reopen it within a week.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2001
The first sign of trouble was an unsettling rumble from beneath the streets, a trembling, grinding sensation that lasted several seconds. Dan Stone felt it on the fifth floor of the cast-iron building he owns at 300 W. Pratt St. In a tavern downstairs, manager Christine Groller felt it, too, believing it was an earthquake. It wasn't like that for Chad Cadden, but he was in a tunnel some 30 feet underground, the engineer of a thrumming diesel hauling 60 freight cars of paper, chemicals, wood pulp, soy oil, bricks and steel north to New Jersey.
NEWS
July 20, 2001
PERHAPS it was just coincidence that a water main broke, knocking out electricity, just as firefighters and emergency crews were trying to contain the smoky fire from a derailed train carrying toxic cargo downtown. But that series of calamities downtown Wednesday underscores how vulnerable Baltimore is to calamity, given its decrepit infrastructure. As long as disasters don't happen, we don't seem to be bothered by leaky wooden water pipes that may be a century old, tottering bridges or cramped subterranean train tunnels that are inadequate for today's needs.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2001
Baltimore firefighters waged a cautious second-day attack yesterday on a nightmarish railroad tunnel fire that shut downtown businesses, knotted traffic, upset freight service along the East Coast and Midwest and disrupted e-mails and cell phone service. Temperatures in the century-old Howard Street Tunnel rose as high as 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit - hot enough to cause some of the CSX rail cars to glow, according to Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, a Fire Department spokesman. "You're talking about metal glowing," he said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 19, 2000
An unidentified man was killed yesterday afternoon when he was struck by a CSX freight train in Middle River. Baltimore County fire officials said the man was walking on the CSX rail line behind Alban Tractor Co. Inc. in the 8800 block of Citation Road when he was hit about 4 p.m. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Rob Gold, a spokesman for CSX, said the man was trespassing on CSX property when he was hit, and that officials are investigating the accident.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
A CSX freight car derailed in western Montgomery County yesterday morning, sideswiping a MARC train headed into Washington and causing delays for 96 commuters on the Brunswick Line. No one was injured on either train. The accident occurred at 8:05 a.m. at Bucklodge Road, about a mile west of MARC's Boyds station. According to CSX, the last car of the empty coal train derailed, striking the oncoming MARC train, the line's last commuter train of the morning. "It definitely struck the windshield and a small fuel valve," said Robert L. Gould, spokesman for CSX. About 10 gallons of diesel fuel leaked from the train, but the spill was contained, he said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 24, 1999
A CSX freight train carrying food, paper products and hazardous materials from Philadelphia to Hamlet, N.C., derailed last night at U.S. 40 and White Marsh Boulevard, according to Baltimore County police.No injuries were reported after at least five CSX Transportation Inc. cars derailed at 11: 10 p.m., nearly two hours after leaving Philadelphia, said Adam Hollingsworth, a CSX spokesman. The cars of unidentified hazardous materials did not derail.CSX, based in Jacksonville, Fla., will investigate the accident, Hollingsworth said.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 11, 1999
In Baltimore CityMan's condition critical after freight train hits him, severs his legsA Baltimore County man's legs were severed early yesterday when he was struck by a Conrail freight train in the 4900 block of E. Lombard St., city traffic police said.Kevin Thomas, 19, of the 9800 block of Charbank Lane in Middle River apparently was trying to cross the track about 2: 45 a.m. when he was struck by the train, which severed his legs and dragged him more than 200 yards. Workers on another Conrail freight train spotted the blood and found Thomas lying on the track, police said.
NEWS
By From staff reports | September 28, 1998
A Middle River man was killed by a freight train yesterdaynear the 700 block of North Point Road in Southeast Baltimore, police said.Michael Thomas Conner, 43, who lived in the first block of Tinker Road, was sitting on a railroad bridge near Quad Avenue about 1: 50 a.m. when a CSX freight train, headed to Philadelphia, struck him and knocked him off the span and into an unnamed creek, said Lt. John Miller of the Southeastern District.Miller said the engineer, who applied the brakes but could not stop the train in time, signaled Conner audibly and visually, but PTC the victim did not move.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 2, 1998
The operator of a street sweeping machine was killed yesterday when his vehicle was struck by a freight train inside the loading tunnel of a Carroll County cement firm, according to state police at the Westminster Barracks.Police said Ronald L. Stewart, 41, was sweeping the inside of the tunnel at the Lehigh Cement Co. in the 100 block of S. Main St. in Union Bridge about 1: 20 p.m. when a train, backing up in the tunnel to take a load of cement, struck the sweeping machine, pushing it against the wall and crushing Stewart, of Union Bridge.
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