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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
A small plane landed upside down in a Bowie cornfield on Saturday morning, though none of the plane's four occupants were injured, Maryland State Police said. The single engine Cessna Skyhawk plane was attempting to land at the Freeway Airport in the 3900 block of Church Road in Bowie at about 10 a.m. when it missed the runway and landed about 100 feet away, State Police said. Federal aviation officials are investigating the crash and the State Police said it's not yet clear why the plane missed the runway.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
A small plane landed upside down in a Bowie cornfield on Saturday morning, though none of the plane's four occupants were injured, Maryland State Police said. The single engine Cessna Skyhawk plane was attempting to land at the Freeway Airport in the 3900 block of Church Road in Bowie at about 10 a.m. when it missed the runway and landed about 100 feet away, State Police said. Federal aviation officials are investigating the crash and the State Police said it's not yet clear why the plane missed the runway.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna - with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods - it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. "I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. - a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience - were practicing touch-and-go landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | September 9, 2006
The Laurel hotels where they stayed have been renovated and still attract an occasional tourist with a camera. The restaurant where they ate pizza has changed owners three times, and the new one says he knows nothing of its infamous former customers. The tiny airport in Bowie that refused to rent them airplanes struggles under the onus of heightened security rules and threatening calls from strangers. Before they crashed seized planes and changed the world, the Sept. 11 terrorists - at least seven of the 19 - lived out their last days in Maryland, lifting weights, washing clothes, looking at pornography, buying groceries and polishing their flying skills.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna - with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods - it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. "I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. - a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience - were practicing touch-and-go landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
BOWIE -- A single-engine plane crashed into a field near tiny Freeway Airport yesterday, killing the pilot and one passenger and seriously injuring another, officials said. The crash occurred about 10 a.m. in snowy, overcast conditions. The pilot of the Cessna 172, Edward Julian Seuter, 40, of Marshall, Va., and his two passengers had come from Warrenton-Fauquier Airport in Midland, Va., and were scheduled to pick up another passenger at Freeway before heading to Atlantic City, N.J., officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Flying an airplane isn't exactly like driving a car, but it is more similar than you might think. Taking the controls of a Cessna 172 SP - a four-seat, single-engine airplane - in Maryland skies feels pretty familiar, despite the altitude and the speed. The trip was an introductory flight lesson by Freeway Airport near Bowie. For $60, the airport's flight school will tuck a novice pilot (meaning someone with no experience whatsoever) and a friend into a tiny airplane and send them up with a flight instructor for a 30-minute joyride.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | September 9, 2006
The Laurel hotels where they stayed have been renovated and still attract an occasional tourist with a camera. The restaurant where they ate pizza has changed owners three times, and the new one says he knows nothing of its infamous former customers. The tiny airport in Bowie that refused to rent them airplanes struggles under the onus of heightened security rules and threatening calls from strangers. Before they crashed seized planes and changed the world, the Sept. 11 terrorists - at least seven of the 19 - lived out their last days in Maryland, lifting weights, washing clothes, looking at pornography, buying groceries and polishing their flying skills.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2013
Three people were injured Monday afternoon - two critically - after a small plane crashed into a wooded area just off of U.S. 50 in Bowie. Two men were evacuated by helicopter to the University of Maryland Medical Center's Shock Trauma Unit, according to Prince George's County Assistant Fire Chief Alicia Francis. A third passenger, an adult woman, was in serious condition. She was taken by ambulance to Prince George's Hospital Center. Francis said the accident occurred at 3:40 p.m. after the small, single-engine plane took off from Freeway Airport in Bowie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2005
Trips Frederick County's Sugarloaf Mountain offers more than just unobstructed views and rocky hiking trails -- it has a sense of history, too. page 28 Outside Always wanted to feel in control of a plane? Freeway Airport offers introductory flights -- as well as longer flying lessons -- that give students the chance to play pilot. page 24 Scene The ambience at special events doesn't develop on its own. At a number of local clubs, the company Cyber-Quest is responsible for designing the atmosphere.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
BOWIE -- A single-engine plane crashed into a field near tiny Freeway Airport yesterday, killing the pilot and one passenger and seriously injuring another, officials said. The crash occurred about 10 a.m. in snowy, overcast conditions. The pilot of the Cessna 172, Edward Julian Seuter, 40, of Marshall, Va., and his two passengers had come from Warrenton-Fauquier Airport in Midland, Va., and were scheduled to pick up another passenger at Freeway before heading to Atlantic City, N.J., officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Flying an airplane isn't exactly like driving a car, but it is more similar than you might think. Taking the controls of a Cessna 172 SP - a four-seat, single-engine airplane - in Maryland skies feels pretty familiar, despite the altitude and the speed. The trip was an introductory flight lesson by Freeway Airport near Bowie. For $60, the airport's flight school will tuck a novice pilot (meaning someone with no experience whatsoever) and a friend into a tiny airplane and send them up with a flight instructor for a 30-minute joyride.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna - with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods - it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. "I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. - a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience - were practicing touch-and-go landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna - with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods - it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. "I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. - a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience - were practicing touch-and-go landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Devon Spurgeon and Devon Spurgeon,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dan Thanh Dang and research librarian Robert Schrott contributed to this article | October 14, 1998
Pat Rodenhauser was in her nightgown pouring hot water into a coffee maker when a plane slammed into her two-story home yesterday morning, killing the pilot and critically injuring the passenger.She and her daughter ran screaming out their front door.The plane, reporting on traffic conditions for local radio stations, appeared to be trying to land in heavy fog at Bowie's Freeway Airport when it crashed 100 yards short of that destination into the Rodenhauser house, setting it ablaze."We heard an airplane flying very close, then a crack and a thud when it hit the ground," said Rodenhauser, 54. She was unhurt, as was her 34-year-old daughter, Kimberly, who'd been packing a lunch for work in the kitchen.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 25, 2000
In Baltimore County Police investigate death of restaurant manager, 21 HUNT VALLEY - Baltimore County police are investigating the death of a Burger King manager whose body was found about 6:30 a.m. yesterday outside the restaurant on York Road. James W. Stambaugh Jr., 21, of the 1400 block of Putty Hill Ave. was found on the ground in an enclosed trash-bin area behind the building. He had trauma to the upper body, said Cpl. Vickie Warehime, a Baltimore County police spokeswoman. An employee arrived at the restaurant, in the 11300 block of York Road, and found blood and money scattered throughout the back of the restaurant near the offices, Warehime said.
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