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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- For the first time in the spate of freeway window shatterings, reported incidents have declined enough that the California Highway Patrol has halted its daily tally of the random vandalism.After the arrests of two men last week in connection with at least some of the 250 attacks, there have been a few isolated window shatterings but none consistent with the main pattern of incidents that began Sept. 11, said CHP Officer Rob Lund.Charges have not been filed against Jose Soto, 21, and Hugo Hernandez, 22, for their alleged role in the attacks, Lund said.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
A man was shot and wounded early Saturday on a street in Essex, according to Baltimore County police. Authorities had few details Saturday morning. Police said the shooting occurred on the street about 2 a.m. in the 1000 block of Mace Ave., just south of Route 702, also known as the Southeast Freeway. The area is residential, with a mix of single family homes and apartments. Police could not immediately provide an age of the victim or say where or how many times had been shot. He was taken by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Southeast Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 20, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Deja vu swept over California Highway Patrol Officer Patti Mackey as she began to interview the victims of a traffic accident in April on a freeway in East Los Angeles.Wasn't passenger Fabricio Garcia the same man she had talked to after two nearly identical freeway accidents involving cars filled with people that were rear-ended by tractor-trailer trucks? Nobody could be that unlucky.In fact, investigators believe, luck had nothing to do with it.Acting on Officer Mackey's recollection and the assistance of a police informant, investigators have concluded that this crash, and dozens of others on Los Angeles' freeways during the last few months, are part of a bizarre scam that has carried the practice of staging accidents to collect insurance money to a new, high-risk extreme.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
San Francisco got rid of the Embarcadero. Milwaukee removed the Park East Freeway. So why shouldn't Baltimore do away with the elevated highway that runs through its downtown? "If you stand on Guilford Avenue and look back at it," says Walter Sondheim Jr., "just imagine what it would be like if it weren't there." Sondheim, whose efforts to transform Baltimore's Inner Harbor helped resuscitate the city, has mentally demolished the Jones Falls Expressway many times. Seeing it vanish - for real - is one of his longest-standing wishes.
NEWS
July 28, 1998
Manuel Mejia Vallejo,75, an award-winning Colombian novelist noted for his realistic depictions of urban and rural life, died Thursday in Bogota, Colombia, after suffering two strokes.James A. Stanley,93, an automotive engineer and former transportation official who had a major impact on Southern California's freeway system, died July 17 in Los Angeles. He encouraged freeway construction during his tenure in the 1970s on the Southern California Transportation Action Committee.Pub Date: 7/28/98
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Staff Writer | January 18, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- First light yesterday revealed Samuel Rubin's luck as well as his misfortune.His little piece of the earthquake's drama reflected the power, tragedy -- and even the mercy -- of nature being felt in the Los Angeles basin.Tremors shook a freeway ramp and overpass off its supports, causing them to crush Mr. Rubin's warehouse business below.The cement block guardhouse, where managers sleep at night, was spared. No one was injured when the east and west bound lanes of the I-10, the Santa Monica Freeway collapsed on Mr. Rubin's Self-Storage Co."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 8, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- A torrential storm swept through Southern California, flooding homes and highways, derailing a train on an overpass above a freeway, setting off rock slides, clogging mountain roads with snow and spinning off waterspouts and destructive cyclonic winds.Rain pounded the Los Angeles area all day, with more than 4 inches reported in some cities by late yesterday. At the Los Angeles Civic Center, 1.26 inches had fallen by midafternoon, eclipsing the old record for the date of 0.90 of an inch, set in 1918.
NEWS
By JANE M. ORIENT | February 28, 1993
Wouldn't it be wonderful to have all the medical care you needed or wanted, without ever worrying about the bill?And wouldn't it be wonderful to drive to work every day without ever paying a toll or stopping at the red light?The second question usually provokes much more critical thought than the first. Before people vote the money to build a freeway through their downtown, a lot of inconvenient objections are raised.The idea of "comprehensive health care reform" to "assure universal access" should stimulate the same thought process.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
For much of the morning, Glenn Clevenger repeated himself as he answered the phone at Suburban Airport. "Hello? Yes, we're open now. No, there are no restrictions now." One by one, pilots strolled back into the Laurel airport's lounge yesterday, smiling -- for the first time in 100 days, they could fly again. "I can't believe it! We're back in the air," shrieked Jim Williamson, who has kept his Navion single-engine plane at Suburban since 1972. The scene replayed itself at Freeway Airport in Bowie and at Maryland Airport in Indian Head.
FEATURES
By Vincent J. Schodolski and Vincent J. Schodolski,Chicago Tribune | June 9, 1995
Los Angeles -- Maybe these things happen in other places.AMaybe there are black bears holding up rush-hour traffic in major cities all across the country. Maybe there are lots of places where the punishment for running a red light can be spending Saturday with an out-of-work comedian.Maybe.But here in Los Angeles, a city where car and man appear more perfectly symbiotic than anywhere else on Earth, such things are part of a daily rhythm that marches to the beat of constantly circling helicopter reporters and traffic updates that blare from the radio every six minutes, 24 hours a day.This is a place where 2 a.m. traffic jams are common, where people eat, shave and sometimes dress in their moving cars and where the subculture of the road has its own language, its heroes, its villains and even its guardian angels.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
For much of the morning, Glenn Clevenger repeated himself as he answered the phone at Suburban Airport. "Hello? Yes, we're open now. No, there are no restrictions now." One by one, pilots strolled back into the Laurel airport's lounge yesterday, smiling -- for the first time in 100 days, they could fly again. "I can't believe it! We're back in the air," shrieked Jim Williamson, who has kept his Navion single-engine plane at Suburban since 1972. The scene replayed itself at Freeway Airport in Bowie and at Maryland Airport in Indian Head.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 12, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The nation's capital came under deadly terrorist assault yesterday morning when a hijacked jetliner flew full-throttle into the Pentagon, the storied seat of U.S. military power. Scores were killed and dozens injured. The crash, part of a coordinated terrorist attack on the United States, took place less than an hour after two other hijacked commercial jets tore into the World Trade Center towers in New York City, with devastating results. A fourth jet, which also may have been targeted at Washington, crashed in southwestern Pennsylvania as it headed toward the capital.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2000
After 20 years of requests and appeals, the state began construction yesterday on improvements to a stretch of Route 32 outside the National Security Agency that will transform the road from a highway with traffic lights to a freeway. The $34 million project, which involves less than a half-mile of roadway, is expected to be completed by 2003. For two decades, agency officials have complained about the daily backups along the road as more than 20,000 employees headed to and from work.
NEWS
By JOHN GEIRLAND | December 6, 1998
LONG before NASA's robotic Pathfinder rumbled across the rocky soil of Mars, Ray Bradbury owned the Red Planet in the popular imagination, courtesy of "The Martian Chronicles" (1950).His 600-plus short stories have laid claim to other worlds. "The Veldt" (1950) inspired a generation of smart-home and virtual-reality pioneers. "A Sound of Thunder" (1952) illustrated chaos theory's butterfly effect years before the theory existed.The fireman Montag's dash for freedom, televised by pursuing helicopters in "Fahrenheit 451" (1953)
NEWS
July 28, 1998
Manuel Mejia Vallejo,75, an award-winning Colombian novelist noted for his realistic depictions of urban and rural life, died Thursday in Bogota, Colombia, after suffering two strokes.James A. Stanley,93, an automotive engineer and former transportation official who had a major impact on Southern California's freeway system, died July 17 in Los Angeles. He encouraged freeway construction during his tenure in the 1970s on the Southern California Transportation Action Committee.Pub Date: 7/28/98
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 27, 1997
Oprah Winfrey was in Cecil County recently for work on "Beloved," a film based on the Toni Morrison story of a former slave. Winfrey is co-producing it with director Jonathan Demme. She and co-star Danny Glover should return to Maryland in the fall and again in winter for seasonal shooting at a replica 1840s homestead, complete with barn and other farm buildings, built for the movie in the great state park at Fair Hill. (I hear there's talk about the state keeping the site after filming.)
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 27, 1997
Oprah Winfrey was in Cecil County recently for work on "Beloved," a film based on the Toni Morrison story of a former slave. Winfrey is co-producing it with director Jonathan Demme. She and co-star Danny Glover should return to Maryland in the fall and again in winter for seasonal shooting at a replica 1840s homestead, complete with barn and other farm buildings, built for the movie in the great state park at Fair Hill. (I hear there's talk about the state keeping the site after filming.)
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 31, 1994
SANTA CLARITA, Calif. -- Happily secluded from the metropolis 30 miles away, residents of this picturesque desert valley north of Los Angeles are finding themselves trapped in their own paradise.Many of them had fled up the Golden State Freeway over the last decade in search of a spot where the streets were safer and the air clear enough for a view of the encircling San Gabriel, Santa Susana and Tehachapi Mountains.Their entire outlook changed at 4:31 a.m. on Jan. 17.When the 6.6-magnitude earthquake dropped the Golden State Freeway like it was made of toy blocks, people in the Santa Clarita Valley realized how tenuous and how important their sole concrete connection to the big city really was.Suddenly, half of those in the valley's work force found that, instead of their usual 30- to 40-minute commute, they had to endure five-hour, bumper-to-bumper trips on side roads.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 10, 1997
"Freeway" is a retelling of the old Little Red Riding Hood tale, but it seems to draw more on Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs than Perrault's French original."Hey, there, Little Red Riding Hood/You sure are looking good" would appear to be the reigning aesthetic as Red shimmies across the Valley in tarty teen clothes that show more than they should. The film reinvents the story in the sleazy suburbs of L.A. and peoples it with archetypes not of 16th century nursery tales but of Jim Thompson novels.
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