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NEWS
November 22, 1994
A Crownsvillle woman was thrown to the ground and robbed Friday evening while visiting a friend in Freetown, police said.Cynthia Williamson, 28, told police a man hit her in the head with a flashlight and stole her purse about 6 p.m. as she walked along a path leading from Freetown Road to New Freetown Road. Ms. Williamson's left eye was bruised and bloodied, but she refused medical treatment, police said.After the attack, she ran to a house in the 7800 block of New Freetown Road, from which police were called.
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By Diane Pajak | August 27, 2012
Padma Yadlapalli, D.V.M., recently opened her veterinary practice in the Hickory Ridge Village Center in Columbia. The Freetown Animal Hospital, housed in the vacated Rave Reviews consignment shop, offers care for companion animals - dogs and cats - but Yadlapalli says, “On occasion I see rabbits and ferrets and mice, too - but not too many of those (mice).” Yadlapalli received her veterinary degree in India in 1999, moved to the United States the following year, completing her board certification and required clinical year at Purdue University in Indiana.
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NEWS
By Lillie Caldwell-Walker | September 29, 1996
PSYCHOLOGISTS tell us -- scientific research bears this out -- that focusing on negative aspects of a situation or relationship tend only to exacerbate that which is considered unacceptable rather than correct or diminish it.Consider the low self-esteem experienced by the individual who is constantly reminded of his failures and who is never praised, commended or recognized for his accomplishments.A community, like a living being, can and does, indeed, grow. Its people prosper with pride when it is recognized and applauded for accomplishments achieved, and when the negative activities which occur there are played down, or seldom, if at all, made public.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | October 24, 2007
Set in a neighborhood becoming dotted with new homes, the white building that houses the Freetown Improvement Association looks plain and unremarkable. The building, however, used to be a focal point of a small community of black farmers founded by ex-slaves in the mid-1800s. Freetown Elementary was a two-room schoolhouse when it opened in 1925, funded partly by a philanthropist who sought to provide schools to blacks when segregation and discrimination were standard practice. It had no indoor plumbing, so students had to use outhouses.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Locust United Methodist Church in Simpsonville will hold a ceremony tomorrow to dedicate a street named for the woman who freed more than 300 slaves through the Underground Railroad.The stretch of Guilford Road in the Freetown neighborhood from Freetown Road to Cedar Lane has been renamed Harriet Tubman Lane for the abolitionist born into slavery in Dorchester County, who is believed to have been freed in 1849.In January, Howard County Council voted to change the street's name, and in March the new street signs were installed.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
A 56-year-old man told police he was robbed of his wallet outside his home Monday evening.Joseph Charles of the 7800 block of New Freetown Road was in front of his home at 6:51 p.m. when a man carrying a wooden stick walked up to him. When the man demanded Mr. Charles' wallet, Mr. Charles hit him in the stomach, police said.As the two men struggled, the robber grabbed the wallet out of Mr. Charles' pocket and ran into the woods, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Willie Charles Johnson, unofficial "mayor of Freetown" and a neighborhood activist who labored tirelessly for decades to improve the quality of life for residents of the historic Anne Arundel County hamlet, died April 20 of a heart attack at Harbor Hospital Center. He was 67. Mr. Johnson was born and raised in Hermitage, Ark., the son of a railroader. After graduation from high school, he moved with his family to Detroit. Later, he enlisted in the Army, serving in Germany with a medical unit.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1999
The southern banks of Marley Creek may not look like much -- a few scrub pines, brush and trees -- but to escaped slaves and free mid-19th century blacks, it was sacred ground.It was a place where blacks could own property and build a home, even before slavery ended, and where runaway slaves were slaves no more, according to local lore.Within the past five years, drugs and violence in its public housing complex have brought Freetown notoriety. But to many descendants of the settlers, the Glen Burnie neighborhood bordered by Mountain Road and Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard is still venerated.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
In response to neighbors' concerns, the developers of a proposed 32-home subdivision in Freetown will change the new community's name to reflect the rich history of the African-American neighborhood.The neighbors object to the size of the project, however, maintaining that it is too big for the 11.5-acre parcel slated for development."The name is not the major problem; the resistance is to the number of houses," said Willie Johnson, president of the Freetown Improvement Association.Mountain Valley, the working name for the proposed subdivision, will be changed to Bouyer's Heritage, Bouyer's Landing or another name to commemorate the Bouyer family, once-prominent landowners in the Glen Burnie community.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
The small Glen Burnie neighborhood of Freetown has always been more than a place to live to its residents. Homeowners have regarded it as hallowed ground, a destination for runaway slaves in the mid-1800s who bought land there, and a refuge from a segregated society during the next century.But for 20 years, community members have watched the historic African-American town shrink as residents have sold property to developers.Those who remain voice the typical complaints about development: more traffic, fewer trees, crowded schools.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2006
About 150 people gathered in the morning chill Friday for the official groundbreaking for the expanded Grassroots Crisis Intervention Center on Freetown Road. Several speakers remarked on the much colder weather, and how that underscored the importance of the project. Richard Krieg, president and CEO of the Horizon Foundation, announced a $150,000 donation to the $5 million effort for transitional costs. The shelter's residents are to move for a year to a house at the former Taylor Manor Hospital in Ellicott City, while the 17-year-old building near Atholton High School is demolished and a larger facility built.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
Frank Seifert started teaching gym at Freetown Elementary School in 1968. And he never left. For 38 years, he's taught pupils at the school how to spike volleyballs, swing tennis rackets and bowl. But now, at age 69, he's decided it's time to retire. He wants to spend more time swimming, sailing and playing volleyball and tennis. He plans to return to the school for activities such as field trips, he said. "It's just time to go," he said. He's also been active with Bello Machre, a residential community in Glen Burnie for developmentally disabled children and adults, and he plans to step up his activities with that organization.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
On Aug. 10, 1869, a deed was drawn up that, for $25, granted 2 acres at the current site of Locust United Methodist Church, near Atholton High School. The area was known as "Freetown," home to a community founded by freed slaves, according to Marion E. Jackson's article about Freetown in Howard's Roads to the Past. "The Church existed in the homes of the freed slaves before this time," Jackson writes. "Today we have families who are direct descendants of the original founders of Locust Church.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
A Baltimore brain surgeon and an Annapolis real estate developer who grew up on opposite sides of Detroit have teamed up to establish a $25,000 scholarship fund for Freetown Elementary School in Glen Burnie. It is the first time a county public school has been chosen for the Carson Scholars Fund, which awards scholarships in Washington and several states, including Maryland, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Wisconsin. The developer, Walter Petrie, said that when he and his wife, Nancy, heard Dr. Benjamin Carson of Johns Hopkins Hospital speak over dinner this year about rising from a Detroit slum to make his way to medical school, they were immediately inspired to contribute to the fund.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 14, 2002
Anne Arundel County police are searching for two men suspected of firing shots Tuesday night in the Freetown area and wounding a man. About 11:45 p.m., a man arrived at the Riviera Beach Fire Department after he was shot in the torso near Freetown Village and Fort Smallwood Road. The victim was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where he was treated and released. About the same time, occupants of another car traveling through the area reported being fired on by two men. No one in the car was hurt, but the vehicle had several holes from the gunfire.
NEWS
By Austin Merrill and Austin Merrill,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2002
FREETOWN, Sierra Leone - At 10 in the morning on April 28, 1998, Alpha Kanu, his wife Fatimata, and their six children were walking through the brush in the district of Kono, in eastern Sierra Leone, when they were met by a group of rebel soldiers. Kanu was forced to the ground, where one of the soldiers hacked off his right arm just below the elbow. The soldier took the severed limb, smacked Kanu in the face with it, and ordered him and his family to flee. His wife and children were not harmed.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
The small Glen Burnie neighborhood of Freetown has always been more than a place to live to its residents. Homeowners have regarded it as hallowed ground, a destination for runaway slaves in the mid-1800s who bought land there, and a refuge from a segregated society during the next century.But for 20 years, community members have watched the historic African-American area shrink as residents have sold property to developers.Those who remain complain about development. But the latest subdivision proposal has residents worried that something less tangible -- the Freetown name and its rich history -- may be lost to future generations of African-Americans.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
On Aug. 10, 1869, a deed was drawn up that, for $25, granted 2 acres at the current site of Locust United Methodist Church, near Atholton High School. The area was known as "Freetown," home to a community founded by freed slaves, according to Marion E. Jackson's article about Freetown in Howard's Roads to the Past. "The Church existed in the homes of the freed slaves before this time," Jackson writes. "Today we have families who are direct descendants of the original founders of Locust Church.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 15, 2002
Robbery suspect is seen in an image from a security camera.A youthful-looking white male wearing a cap robbed SunTrust Bank on Freetown Road in Columbia about 11 a.m. yesterday, Howard County police said. The man, described as 5 feet 10 inches tall with a medium build, wore glasses and appeared to be between 18 and 24 years old, police said. He implied he had a gun and quietly demanded money, police said. The teller complied, and the robber fled with an undetermined amount of cash in an unknown direction, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Willie Charles Johnson, unofficial "mayor of Freetown" and a neighborhood activist who labored tirelessly for decades to improve the quality of life for residents of the historic Anne Arundel County hamlet, died April 20 of a heart attack at Harbor Hospital Center. He was 67. Mr. Johnson was born and raised in Hermitage, Ark., the son of a railroader. After graduation from high school, he moved with his family to Detroit. Later, he enlisted in the Army, serving in Germany with a medical unit.
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