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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Baltimore and the Bahamas' Freeport have a lot in common. They're both cities with a mix of tourist areas and heavy industry, and both often play second banana to a national capital. Now the two cities are linked by a direct air service that began Thursday. Vision Airlines, a U.S. carrier known for its occasional role as a charter contractor for the Central Intelligence Agency, will offer twice-weekly service between Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and Freeport, a vacation destination that in recent years has been eclipsed by bustling Nassau.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Baltimore and the Bahamas' Freeport have a lot in common. They're both cities with a mix of tourist areas and heavy industry, and both often play second banana to a national capital. Now the two cities are linked by a direct air service that began Thursday. Vision Airlines, a U.S. carrier known for its occasional role as a charter contractor for the Central Intelligence Agency, will offer twice-weekly service between Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and Freeport, a vacation destination that in recent years has been eclipsed by bustling Nassau.
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BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 22, 1997
FREEPORT, Maine -- Burton Brewer still savors the tangible and detailed fabric of small-town life. The man at the record store knows Brewer and his tastes. He is received warmly at the coffee shop. Friends and neighbors greet him or stop to chat as he makes his way from shop to shop on Main Street.The problem for Brewer is that all this community warmth takes place 10 miles from the town where he lived for 50 years. Freeport is his home, but downtown Brunswick is his village.Freeport, he said, has been consumed by retail outlets and has lost its center -- literally and culturally.
NEWS
July 4, 2002
Wayne A. Bryant, a retired chemist and production manager for SCM Chemicals, died of a heart attack Thursday at North Arundel Hospital. He was 72 and lived in Annapolis. Born in Wewoka, Okla., and raised in Booneville, Ark., Mr. Bryant served in the late 1940s and early 1950s as an electrician in the Navy. After being discharged as a chief warrant officer, he earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry from Central State University in Edmond, Okla., in 1954. In 1954, he began his career as a chemist working for Freeport Sulphur Chemicals in Freeport, Texas, and later was transferred to a subsidiary of the company in Moa Bay, Cuba.
TRAVEL
By Les Picker and Les Picker,Special to the Sun | August 22, 1999
Few corporate names are so intimately woven into the fabric of a city that if you name the company, you know exactly where its roots are. Kodak and Roches-ter, N.Y., is one likely pair; DuPont and Wilmington, Del., another. But, for my travel buck, I'll take L. L. Bean and the charming town of Freeport, Maine, any day.For generations, outdoorsmen have made the pilgrimage down Freeport's Main Street to visit the venerable L. L. Bean. I remember back in the 1960s and '70s, walking up the two flights of creaky wooden stairs a few times each year, stopping with my children to stare at the dioramas of stuffed black bears, pheasants and beavers recessed into the walls as you ascended.
NEWS
July 4, 2002
Wayne A. Bryant, a retired chemist and production manager for SCM Chemicals, died of a heart attack Thursday at North Arundel Hospital. He was 72 and lived in Annapolis. Born in Wewoka, Okla., and raised in Booneville, Ark., Mr. Bryant served in the late 1940s and early 1950s as an electrician in the Navy. After being discharged as a chief warrant officer, he earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry from Central State University in Edmond, Okla., in 1954. In 1954, he began his career as a chemist working for Freeport Sulphur Chemicals in Freeport, Texas, and later was transferred to a subsidiary of the company in Moa Bay, Cuba.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 19, 2000
NEW YORK -- It was billed as a Millennium Cruise on the Paradise, but passengers say they didn't go to any of the Caribbean spots promised -- and the next destination will be court. About 1,600 dissatisfied Carnival Cruise Line customers are preparing to file a class-action lawsuit. "We knew we were paying a premium for this, but it didn't matter because there's only one millennium. ... Carnival didn't deliver," said Pat Wright of Rockland County, N.Y. The 2,600 passengers paid from $1,350 to $2,550 apiece for an eight-day cruise to Tortola, Virgin Gorda, St. Thomas and Puerto Rico.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 14, 2000
FREEPORT, N.Y. -- By noon the other day, the temperature was already approaching the 90s as a cool Rep. Rick Lazio arrived for the ribbon-cutting to open the annual Freeport Nautical Mile Festival. A perpetual boyish grin met all well-wishers as he posed with the local notables. Leisurely, the 42-year-old Republican and a small entourage strolled down the town's long fishing pier, stopping to greet operators of the various stands set up along the way who were hawking everything from funnel cakes and lemonade to handicrafts and cruises on Long Island Sound.
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen | September 11, 1994
Hot Springs holidayWhile the first family now spends its holidays on Martha's Vineyard or at least Camp David, you, yes you, can start planning a winter holiday at the old Clinton haunt, Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas. The park's monthlong winter festival, Holiday in the Park, gets under way Nov. 25 and runs through Jan. 1, 1995.The resort spa's holiday events are highlighted by the largest luminaria display in the southern United States. Thousands of these lanterns will cast light along the city's downtown district and Bathhouse Row. Luminaria are crafted from tea candles tucked inside little paper bags.
SPORTS
April 6, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- Chip Beck blasted out of a bunker on the 18th hole and made a 6-foot putt to win by one stroke over Greg Norman and Mike Standly.Beck blew a three-stroke lead with a round of 74 on Saturday and went into yesterday's final 18 holes trailing Jeff Maggert by two shots. But Maggert carded a seven-bogey 75, slipping to a tie for fourth in the $1 million tournament.Norman shared the lead briefly after five holes, then bogeyed the sixth and fell five strokes behind after Beck's eagle on No. 11.Beck bogeyed the 13th hole, and Norman birdied 12, 13 and 16 to pull to a stroke down with two holes to go."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
A Baltimore businessman awaiting retrial in a major alternative-medicine case was told this week that he could no longer work in the Bahamas, where he has continued administering controversial aloe vera treatments to critically ill customers. Allen J. Hoffman returned to the United States yesterday after Bahamian authorities notified him Sunday his permit to work at a natural health clinic in Freeport was revoked, said Lambert Campbell, deputy director of immigration for the Bahamas. The clinic's head, Kevin C. King, said in an interview he cut his ties to Hoffman after learning more about the federal charges against him in Maryland and discovering that Hoffman was not a medical doctor, as King said Hoffman had represented.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 14, 2000
FREEPORT, N.Y. -- By noon the other day, the temperature was already approaching the 90s as a cool Rep. Rick Lazio arrived for the ribbon-cutting to open the annual Freeport Nautical Mile Festival. A perpetual boyish grin met all well-wishers as he posed with the local notables. Leisurely, the 42-year-old Republican and a small entourage strolled down the town's long fishing pier, stopping to greet operators of the various stands set up along the way who were hawking everything from funnel cakes and lemonade to handicrafts and cruises on Long Island Sound.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 19, 2000
NEW YORK -- It was billed as a Millennium Cruise on the Paradise, but passengers say they didn't go to any of the Caribbean spots promised -- and the next destination will be court. About 1,600 dissatisfied Carnival Cruise Line customers are preparing to file a class-action lawsuit. "We knew we were paying a premium for this, but it didn't matter because there's only one millennium. ... Carnival didn't deliver," said Pat Wright of Rockland County, N.Y. The 2,600 passengers paid from $1,350 to $2,550 apiece for an eight-day cruise to Tortola, Virgin Gorda, St. Thomas and Puerto Rico.
TRAVEL
By Les Picker and Les Picker,Special to the Sun | August 22, 1999
Few corporate names are so intimately woven into the fabric of a city that if you name the company, you know exactly where its roots are. Kodak and Roches-ter, N.Y., is one likely pair; DuPont and Wilmington, Del., another. But, for my travel buck, I'll take L. L. Bean and the charming town of Freeport, Maine, any day.For generations, outdoorsmen have made the pilgrimage down Freeport's Main Street to visit the venerable L. L. Bean. I remember back in the 1960s and '70s, walking up the two flights of creaky wooden stairs a few times each year, stopping with my children to stare at the dioramas of stuffed black bears, pheasants and beavers recessed into the walls as you ascended.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | December 22, 1997
FREEPORT, Maine -- Burton Brewer still savors the tangible and detailed fabric of small-town life. The man at the record store knows Brewer and his tastes. He is received warmly at the coffee shop. Friends and neighbors greet him or stop to chat as he makes his way from shop to shop on Main Street.The problem for Brewer is that all this community warmth takes place 10 miles from the town where he lived for 50 years. Freeport is his home, but downtown Brunswick is his village.Freeport, he said, has been consumed by retail outlets and has lost its center -- literally and culturally.
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen | September 11, 1994
Hot Springs holidayWhile the first family now spends its holidays on Martha's Vineyard or at least Camp David, you, yes you, can start planning a winter holiday at the old Clinton haunt, Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas. The park's monthlong winter festival, Holiday in the Park, gets under way Nov. 25 and runs through Jan. 1, 1995.The resort spa's holiday events are highlighted by the largest luminaria display in the southern United States. Thousands of these lanterns will cast light along the city's downtown district and Bathhouse Row. Luminaria are crafted from tea candles tucked inside little paper bags.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
A Baltimore businessman awaiting retrial in a major alternative-medicine case was told this week that he could no longer work in the Bahamas, where he has continued administering controversial aloe vera treatments to critically ill customers. Allen J. Hoffman returned to the United States yesterday after Bahamian authorities notified him Sunday his permit to work at a natural health clinic in Freeport was revoked, said Lambert Campbell, deputy director of immigration for the Bahamas. The clinic's head, Kevin C. King, said in an interview he cut his ties to Hoffman after learning more about the federal charges against him in Maryland and discovering that Hoffman was not a medical doctor, as King said Hoffman had represented.
NEWS
September 28, 2008
Nancy Robertson A memorial service will be held at the South Freeport Church, 98 South Freeport Road, Freeport, ME on Friday October 10th at 11am. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to: Common Good Ventures, 14 Main Street, Brunswick, ME 04011; National Downs Syndrome Society, 666 Broadway, NY, NY 10012; or a charity of your choice.
SPORTS
April 6, 1992
NEW ORLEANS -- Chip Beck blasted out of a bunker on the 18th hole and made a 6-foot putt to win by one stroke over Greg Norman and Mike Standly.Beck blew a three-stroke lead with a round of 74 on Saturday and went into yesterday's final 18 holes trailing Jeff Maggert by two shots. But Maggert carded a seven-bogey 75, slipping to a tie for fourth in the $1 million tournament.Norman shared the lead briefly after five holes, then bogeyed the sixth and fell five strokes behind after Beck's eagle on No. 11.Beck bogeyed the 13th hole, and Norman birdied 12, 13 and 16 to pull to a stroke down with two holes to go."
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