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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Lisa Respers and Joe Mathews contributed to this article | July 31, 1995
ROUNDUP, Mont. -- From a log house in the foothills of the Bull Mountains, Rodney O. Skurdal wages war against the officials of Musselshell County.He spares no one. The sheriff, the county attorney, the judge, the county commissioners, all deemed traitors to the "country" of Montana. He summons them before a supreme court of his own creation, a tribunal of "Freemen" who obey what they view as God's laws, refuse to pay taxes, and threaten to hang treasonous public officials.Rodney Skurdal is among a small but nascent group of anti-government tax protesters confounding officials in Montana.
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FEATURES
October 6, 1996
150 years ago in The SunOct. 6: The contract for building an iron bridge over Jones' Falls, at Madison Street, made on the part of the city by the city commissioners, has been ratified.Oct. 7: THE ELECTION TO-DAY -- After reading The Sun and eating their breakfasts this morning, it will become the duty of our citizens, to go forth to exercise the dearest privilege of freemen -- the suffrage of untrammelled political sentiment through the medium of the ballot.100 years ago in The SunOct. 6: ORIOLES FIELD DAY -- The field sports at Union Park which have been arranged for the benefit of the champions will be held next Saturday, provided Baltimore wins the first game in Cleveland.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- Federal agents cut off electricity yesterday to the 960-acre ranch where 18 people have been holed up for 71 days, hoping to force leaders of the Freemen, a radical anti-government group, to resume negotiations for a peaceful surrender.The FBI also has brought three armored vehicles to the area, and the clatter of a low-flying helicopter brought in by the FBI has been echoing off the rolling hills around the ranch.FBI agents have established additional checkpoints along the gravel road leading to the ranch.
NEWS
June 16, 1996
PROSECUTION of the Montana Freemen should be as resolute and as consonant with the highest principles of American justice as the FBI siege that led peacefully to their incarceration. The defendants will be entitled to all the protections afforded rebellious citizens by the very government they loathe. In the end, the law must prevail, not least as a lesson to others who would try to take it into their own hands.These right-wing militants, spouting their racist and anti-social theories, are not heroes.
NEWS
By T. J. Stiles | April 14, 1996
On the wind-swept Montana plains, by the shores of the upper Missouri River, a heavily armed party surrounded a hut filled with desperate men. Two or three were picked off as they emerged; "the rest," wrote one observer, "barricaded themselves in and fought until the great log hut was set on fire, when they broke forth in a body, and nearly all were killed at once."A possible outcome of the current siege of the "Freemen"? Perhaps. But the words belong to Theodore Roosevelt, and the events took place 110 years ago, not far from where at least 10 Freemen today are holed up on a farm.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- Two years ago, neighbors around here pitched in to save Casey Clark's life by donating equipment for a big farm auction.The farmers raised $125,000, and Mr. Clark's brain tumor operation was a success."
NEWS
April 2, 1996
THE SELF-STYLED Freemen of Montana, holding off federal law enforcement, are in an American tradition as old as the republic. But so is the authority that must in the end prevail. Most of the Freemen were debtors who came to dispute the legitimacy of the political authority enforcing creditors' rights. So were some Chesapeake tobacco planters in the 1770s who became Patriots in the American Revolution.More relevant forerunners were the farmers of Western Massachusetts who rallied behind Capt.
NEWS
June 16, 1996
PROSECUTION of the Montana Freemen should be as resolute and as consonant with the highest principles of American justice as the FBI siege that led peacefully to their incarceration. The defendants will be entitled to all the protections afforded rebellious citizens by the very government they loathe. In the end, the law must prevail, not least as a lesson to others who would try to take it into their own hands.These right-wing militants, spouting their racist and anti-social theories, are not heroes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- In the first defections from the Freemen fugitives in two months, a couple, along with the woman's two children, voluntarily left the group's High Plains farmhouse yesterday and were whisked away by federal agents.The break follows the government's increasing pressure tactics, which began Monday with the shut-off of electricity to the compound, where 18 people, including the two children who left yesterday and a 16-year-old boy, had been holed up since March 25.The four who left the compound were identified as Elwyn Ward, 55, Gloria Ward, 35 (also known as Tamara Mangum)
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 3, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- It's tough to say how this all began, how a couple of brothers named Ralph and Emmett Clark changed from affable farmers into nationally known revolutionaries.But some of the locals think a visit by Geraldo Rivera in the early 1980s is as good a starting point as any.There were no so-called Freemen at that point, no hatred of the government. Back then, there was only Ralph Clark's foundering farm, and the Farmers Home Administration officials who wanted to foreclose on it.From Mr. Rivera's visit, one thing led to another.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- In the first defections from the Freemen fugitives in two months, a couple, along with the woman's two children, voluntarily left the group's High Plains farmhouse yesterday and were whisked away by federal agents.The break follows the government's increasing pressure tactics, which began Monday with the shut-off of electricity to the compound, where 18 people, including the two children who left yesterday and a 16-year-old boy, had been holed up since March 25.The four who left the compound were identified as Elwyn Ward, 55, Gloria Ward, 35 (also known as Tamara Mangum)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- Federal agents cut off electricity yesterday to the 960-acre ranch where 18 people have been holed up for 71 days, hoping to force leaders of the Freemen, a radical anti-government group, to resume negotiations for a peaceful surrender.The FBI also has brought three armored vehicles to the area, and the clatter of a low-flying helicopter brought in by the FBI has been echoing off the rolling hills around the ranch.FBI agents have established additional checkpoints along the gravel road leading to the ranch.
NEWS
By T. J. Stiles | April 14, 1996
On the wind-swept Montana plains, by the shores of the upper Missouri River, a heavily armed party surrounded a hut filled with desperate men. Two or three were picked off as they emerged; "the rest," wrote one observer, "barricaded themselves in and fought until the great log hut was set on fire, when they broke forth in a body, and nearly all were killed at once."A possible outcome of the current siege of the "Freemen"? Perhaps. But the words belong to Theodore Roosevelt, and the events took place 110 years ago, not far from where at least 10 Freemen today are holed up on a farm.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 3, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- It's tough to say how this all began, how a couple of brothers named Ralph and Emmett Clark changed from affable farmers into nationally known revolutionaries.But some of the locals think a visit by Geraldo Rivera in the early 1980s is as good a starting point as any.There were no so-called Freemen at that point, no hatred of the government. Back then, there was only Ralph Clark's foundering farm, and the Farmers Home Administration officials who wanted to foreclose on it.From Mr. Rivera's visit, one thing led to another.
NEWS
April 2, 1996
THE SELF-STYLED Freemen of Montana, holding off federal law enforcement, are in an American tradition as old as the republic. But so is the authority that must in the end prevail. Most of the Freemen were debtors who came to dispute the legitimacy of the political authority enforcing creditors' rights. So were some Chesapeake tobacco planters in the 1770s who became Patriots in the American Revolution.More relevant forerunners were the farmers of Western Massachusetts who rallied behind Capt.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 1996
JORDAN, Mont. -- Two years ago, neighbors around here pitched in to save Casey Clark's life by donating equipment for a big farm auction.The farmers raised $125,000, and Mr. Clark's brain tumor operation was a success."
FEATURES
October 6, 1996
150 years ago in The SunOct. 6: The contract for building an iron bridge over Jones' Falls, at Madison Street, made on the part of the city by the city commissioners, has been ratified.Oct. 7: THE ELECTION TO-DAY -- After reading The Sun and eating their breakfasts this morning, it will become the duty of our citizens, to go forth to exercise the dearest privilege of freemen -- the suffrage of untrammelled political sentiment through the medium of the ballot.100 years ago in The SunOct. 6: ORIOLES FIELD DAY -- The field sports at Union Park which have been arranged for the benefit of the champions will be held next Saturday, provided Baltimore wins the first game in Cleveland.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | January 12, 1992
From The Sun Jan. 12-18, 1842JAN. 13: Annapolis -- By our correspondent's letter, it will be seen that the convention of slave holders have met, and proceeded to business.JAN. 18: This is the anniversary of the birth-day of the emphatically great Franklin; therefore let it be honored -- and why should it not? -- by all American freemen, but by printers in particular.From The Sun Jan. 12-18, 1892JAN. 15: The indications are that the observance of Gen. Robert E. Lee's birthday, January 19, will be more general throughout the South than ever before.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Lisa Respers and Joe Mathews contributed to this article | July 31, 1995
ROUNDUP, Mont. -- From a log house in the foothills of the Bull Mountains, Rodney O. Skurdal wages war against the officials of Musselshell County.He spares no one. The sheriff, the county attorney, the judge, the county commissioners, all deemed traitors to the "country" of Montana. He summons them before a supreme court of his own creation, a tribunal of "Freemen" who obey what they view as God's laws, refuse to pay taxes, and threaten to hang treasonous public officials.Rodney Skurdal is among a small but nascent group of anti-government tax protesters confounding officials in Montana.
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