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Freedom Summer

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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 10, 2000
Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Carol Weinberg returns to the festival this summer with a play grounded in the Civil Rights struggle. "Freedom Summer," which opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players, tells the story of a housewife from Queens, N.Y., whose commonplace existence is upset by the disappearance of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, three young men who volunteered to register voters in Mississippi in 1964. Lynda McClary stars as the housewife, and Matthew Bowerman portrays Goodman.
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NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 6, 2014
As the holiday weekend draws to a close, please pause from the cookouts and fireworks to reflect on the meaning of this freedom we've been celebrating, knowingly or not. When 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he placed it in the context of "a long struggle for freedom" that began when the Founding Fathers adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. "They pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, not only to found a nation, but to forge an ideal of freedom; not only for political independence, but for personal liberty; not only to eliminate foreign rule, but to establish the rule of justice in the affairs of men. " Now, we know that the noble ideal of 1776 did not really embrace blacks, women, Native Americans or whites without property.
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NEWS
By Nell Irvin Painter | August 1, 1994
THIS SEASON marks the 30th anniversary of Freedom Summer, and the lessons of that summer apply today, as we all confront a nationwide epidemic of violence.In 1964, more than 1,000 Northern college students -- mostly white but some black -- went south to Mississippi. There they helped veteran civil rights workers rekindle a campaign to register black voters threatened by white-supremacist terrorism.Freedom Summer was the brainchild of Robert Moses (of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee)
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
This was the promise: No longer would African-Americans be forced to pick up their meals from the back door of restaurants. No longer would they need to fear being unable to find lodgings on their way home from a trip. And no longer would those who denied them a seat in a theater or on a merry-go-round be able to cloak their prejudice with the law. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964, the culmination of decades of struggle for racial equality.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2003
Weinberg remembered As a tribute to the late Carol Weinberg, who had five plays produced by the Baltimore Playwrights Festival before her death from cancer at age 54 two years ago, the Vagabond Players is reviving its 2000 production of Weinberg's Freedom Summer. Set in 1964, the drama, which opens tomorrow, stars Lynda McClary, re-creating the lead role of a bored housewife who becomes increasingly drawn to the plight of the three young civil rights workers -- James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner -- who disappeared during a voter registration drive in Mississippi.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
Calling education the next step in the civil rights movement, hundreds of Baltimore students are planning to take to the streets today to demand a $1 billion commitment to the city schools from the gubernatorial candidates. Students are calling their campaign "Freedom Fall 2006," modeled after Freedom Summer 1964, when thousands of civil rights activists descended on Mississippi to assert the right of disenfranchised blacks to vote. The protest is being led by the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student tutoring and advocacy group.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | January 29, 1995
Black History Month in February salutes the contributions of African-Americans, and a variety of programs are planned to celebrate black heritage at museums and historic sites around the region.As part of its Winter Discovery Series, Colonial Williamsburg presents a program focusing on the lives of slaves and free blacks in the 18th-century Colonial capital, where blacks constituted nearly 50 percent of the population. "Ain't I Your Equal?: African-American Life and Struggle in 18th-Century Williamsburg" takes place this week from Tuesday to Saturday and features dramatic re-enactments of courthouse cases, vignettes of 18th-century black women, a talk on the transformation of African musical traditions, lectures, films and walking tours.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 6, 2014
As the holiday weekend draws to a close, please pause from the cookouts and fireworks to reflect on the meaning of this freedom we've been celebrating, knowingly or not. When 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he placed it in the context of "a long struggle for freedom" that began when the Founding Fathers adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. "They pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, not only to found a nation, but to forge an ideal of freedom; not only for political independence, but for personal liberty; not only to eliminate foreign rule, but to establish the rule of justice in the affairs of men. " Now, we know that the noble ideal of 1776 did not really embrace blacks, women, Native Americans or whites without property.
NEWS
By Diane Camper | January 8, 2005
FOR MANY who are old enough to remember, the summer of 1964 was particularly poignant. It was called "Freedom Summer," in recognition of the hundreds of volunteers who went to Mississippi to register blacks to vote. But amid the hope, promise and sheer determination that prompted so many, mostly college students, to give up their summer to help reverse decades of disenfranchisement of African-Americans, came the cold reality of sacrifice: Three of those fearless workers would also give up their lives.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 27, 2005
ATLANTA - If your son had been murdered 41 years ago simply for his political activism, would you be willing to forget it after all these years and allow the mastermind of his murder to go free? If your child had been executed by vicious animals and buried anonymously in an earthen dam, would you tell government authorities to let the man who staged his murder off the hook because he's now old? Of course not. Neither did the families of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman or Michael Schwerner.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 3, 2014
I spent several days in New York last week with students from around the country who were preparing to head into the heartland to help organize Walmart workers for better jobs and wages. (Full familial disclosure: My son Adam is one of the leaders.) Almost exactly 50 years ago, a similar group headed to Mississippi to register African-Americans to vote, in what came to be known as Freedom Summer. Call this Freedom Summer II. The current struggle of low-wage workers across America echoes the civil rights struggle of the 1960s.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
Calling education the next step in the civil rights movement, hundreds of Baltimore students are planning to take to the streets today to demand a $1 billion commitment to the city schools from the gubernatorial candidates. Students are calling their campaign "Freedom Fall 2006," modeled after Freedom Summer 1964, when thousands of civil rights activists descended on Mississippi to assert the right of disenfranchised blacks to vote. The protest is being led by the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student tutoring and advocacy group.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM | January 16, 2006
America is no land of dreams these days, but I have a specific suggestion for the white people of Baltimore today: Get up and go to the city's sixth parade honoring the memory and birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The fun starts at noon. I covered the inaugural parade five years ago and witnessed what a joyous occasion it is in the city's collective life. But time and again, whites have been notably absent among the thousands of faces lining the streets of West Baltimore, starting at Eutaw Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 27, 2005
ATLANTA - If your son had been murdered 41 years ago simply for his political activism, would you be willing to forget it after all these years and allow the mastermind of his murder to go free? If your child had been executed by vicious animals and buried anonymously in an earthen dam, would you tell government authorities to let the man who staged his murder off the hook because he's now old? Of course not. Neither did the families of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman or Michael Schwerner.
NEWS
By Diane Camper | January 8, 2005
FOR MANY who are old enough to remember, the summer of 1964 was particularly poignant. It was called "Freedom Summer," in recognition of the hundreds of volunteers who went to Mississippi to register blacks to vote. But amid the hope, promise and sheer determination that prompted so many, mostly college students, to give up their summer to help reverse decades of disenfranchisement of African-Americans, came the cold reality of sacrifice: Three of those fearless workers would also give up their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2003
Weinberg remembered As a tribute to the late Carol Weinberg, who had five plays produced by the Baltimore Playwrights Festival before her death from cancer at age 54 two years ago, the Vagabond Players is reviving its 2000 production of Weinberg's Freedom Summer. Set in 1964, the drama, which opens tomorrow, stars Lynda McClary, re-creating the lead role of a bored housewife who becomes increasingly drawn to the plight of the three young civil rights workers -- James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner -- who disappeared during a voter registration drive in Mississippi.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM | January 16, 2006
America is no land of dreams these days, but I have a specific suggestion for the white people of Baltimore today: Get up and go to the city's sixth parade honoring the memory and birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The fun starts at noon. I covered the inaugural parade five years ago and witnessed what a joyous occasion it is in the city's collective life. But time and again, whites have been notably absent among the thousands of faces lining the streets of West Baltimore, starting at Eutaw Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
This was the promise: No longer would African-Americans be forced to pick up their meals from the back door of restaurants. No longer would they need to fear being unable to find lodgings on their way home from a trip. And no longer would those who denied them a seat in a theater or on a merry-go-round be able to cloak their prejudice with the law. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964, the culmination of decades of struggle for racial equality.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 21, 2000
Now that the Baltimore Playwrights Festival is producing its fifth play by Carol Weinberg, audiences know they can expect certain things. Her dialogue will have a natural-sounding flow. Her characters will be recognizable. And her themes will be serious and relevant. All of these characteristics apply to Weinberg's "Freedom Summer," currently receiving a forceful production at the Vagabond Players. Although the play is set in 1964, when the civil rights struggle was raging and women's liberation was just a glimmer, the play's central theme of taking a stand and acting on your beliefs will never be dated.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 10, 2000
Baltimore Playwrights Festival veteran Carol Weinberg returns to the festival this summer with a play grounded in the Civil Rights struggle. "Freedom Summer," which opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players, tells the story of a housewife from Queens, N.Y., whose commonplace existence is upset by the disappearance of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney, three young men who volunteered to register voters in Mississippi in 1964. Lynda McClary stars as the housewife, and Matthew Bowerman portrays Goodman.
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