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By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,sun staff | February 18, 1996
2TC "The Last Hotel for Women," by Vicki Covington. Simon & Schuster. 300 pages. $23 Birmingham, Ala., isn't a typical setting for a novel, even one set in the civil rights era, when the city was a synonym for segregation. Vicki Covington uses a fictional family to explain the complexities of her hometown, both to those who know nothing about it and people who have lived there all their lives and purposely put its embarrassing past out of their minds.I met Ms. Covington several years ago when she started writing an occasional opinion column for the Birmingham News, where I was an editorial writer.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Tucked inside the files at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston are State Department notes from the 1960s detailing racial discrimination along U.S. 40 in Maryland - and warning the president of its implications for the Cold War. One account describes the experience of an African diplomat who couldn't find a restaurant to serve a glass of water for his son as the boy struggled to catch his breath during an asthma attack. Another tells of a diplomat who drove 10 bleary-eyed hours along the highway - then the main thoroughfare between New York and Washington - because motels in Maryland wouldn't rent him a room for the night.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 7, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- On a grassy hill overlooking U.S. Route 1 is the old dormitory called Harford Hall, where Melvin Potillo used to tell us stories about freedom rides through the South to stir our souls.I don't know if anybody here remembers freedom rides anymore, or finds them honorable if they do. The evidence is not encouraging. But a long time ago, when a generation thought Martin Luther King's dream was the articulation of the true American ideal, we'd listen to Melvin's stories of integrating the South and think we were listening to the future.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 17, 2014
Here we go again. Same stuff, different day. Deja vu all over again. A monthly New York newspaper, The WestView News, uses an objectionable headline (" The N----r In The White House ") on a piece in its July edition, which argues that much of the shrill hatred toward President Obama is rooted in racism. Not surprisingly, the headline gets more attention than the argument. Then on Sunday, Attorney General Eric Holder again blames "racial animus" for some of the more strident opposition to the president.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 17, 2014
Here we go again. Same stuff, different day. Deja vu all over again. A monthly New York newspaper, The WestView News, uses an objectionable headline (" The N----r In The White House ") on a piece in its July edition, which argues that much of the shrill hatred toward President Obama is rooted in racism. Not surprisingly, the headline gets more attention than the argument. Then on Sunday, Attorney General Eric Holder again blames "racial animus" for some of the more strident opposition to the president.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Tucked inside the files at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library in Boston are State Department notes from the 1960s detailing racial discrimination along U.S. 40 in Maryland - and warning the president of its implications for the Cold War. One account describes the experience of an African diplomat who couldn't find a restaurant to serve a glass of water for his son as the boy struggled to catch his breath during an asthma attack. Another tells of a diplomat who drove 10 bleary-eyed hours along the highway - then the main thoroughfare between New York and Washington - because motels in Maryland wouldn't rent him a room for the night.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 15, 2011
We are on the 2011 Student Freedom Riders bus rolling toward Augusta, Ga., watching "The Murder of Emmett Till," a PBS documentary on the savage 1955 lynching of a black boy in the nothing town of Money, Miss. On the old newsreel footage, white person after white person spews the grotesque bigotry that was common to white people in that time and place, and somebody asks Ryan Price a question: How do you feel as a white guy, watching a film like this? "It was a good question," he tells me that evening at the hotel.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
As an immigrant workers "freedom ride" passed through Baltimore yesterday, participants demonstrated for privileges such as amnesty for illegal immigrants and in-state college tuition rates for foreign-born students. "My legal status will not allow me to accomplish my dreams," said Maria Blas, a Mexican native who lives in Shakopee, Minn., told the cheering crowd of about 200 people at the University of Maryland Law School Plaza. "I do not deserve to be punished for being here." The mainly Spanish-speaking group was part of the Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride, a nationwide demonstration backed by labor unions.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
Immigrant workers at the University of Maryland, College Park hope that a coming bus ride that will carry them and others to rallies throughout the Northeast will help draw attention to their problems, including low pay and long hours. "We need help to improve our lives," said Maria Elena Torres, a janitor at the school who says she earns $8.77 an hour. Torres spoke at a news conference yesterday to help raise awareness about Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride, a bus caravan that begins Sept.
NEWS
June 3, 2003
Burke Marshall, 80, the government's legal strategist on civil rights in the era of freedom rides, the Birmingham church bombing and the March on Washington, died yesterday at his home in Newtown, Conn., of a bone marrow disorder. As assistant attorney general in charge of the Justice Department's civil rights division in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, Mr. Marshall was a chief contributor to rights victories that included the government's 1961 ban on segregation in interstate travel, desegregation of the University of Mississippi the next year, and adoption of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which barred discrimination in public accommodations.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 15, 2011
We are on the 2011 Student Freedom Riders bus rolling toward Augusta, Ga., watching "The Murder of Emmett Till," a PBS documentary on the savage 1955 lynching of a black boy in the nothing town of Money, Miss. On the old newsreel footage, white person after white person spews the grotesque bigotry that was common to white people in that time and place, and somebody asks Ryan Price a question: How do you feel as a white guy, watching a film like this? "It was a good question," he tells me that evening at the hotel.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
As an immigrant workers "freedom ride" passed through Baltimore yesterday, participants demonstrated for privileges such as amnesty for illegal immigrants and in-state college tuition rates for foreign-born students. "My legal status will not allow me to accomplish my dreams," said Maria Blas, a Mexican native who lives in Shakopee, Minn., told the cheering crowd of about 200 people at the University of Maryland Law School Plaza. "I do not deserve to be punished for being here." The mainly Spanish-speaking group was part of the Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride, a nationwide demonstration backed by labor unions.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2003
Immigrant workers at the University of Maryland, College Park hope that a coming bus ride that will carry them and others to rallies throughout the Northeast will help draw attention to their problems, including low pay and long hours. "We need help to improve our lives," said Maria Elena Torres, a janitor at the school who says she earns $8.77 an hour. Torres spoke at a news conference yesterday to help raise awareness about Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride, a bus caravan that begins Sept.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,sun staff | February 18, 1996
2TC "The Last Hotel for Women," by Vicki Covington. Simon & Schuster. 300 pages. $23 Birmingham, Ala., isn't a typical setting for a novel, even one set in the civil rights era, when the city was a synonym for segregation. Vicki Covington uses a fictional family to explain the complexities of her hometown, both to those who know nothing about it and people who have lived there all their lives and purposely put its embarrassing past out of their minds.I met Ms. Covington several years ago when she started writing an occasional opinion column for the Birmingham News, where I was an editorial writer.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 7, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- On a grassy hill overlooking U.S. Route 1 is the old dormitory called Harford Hall, where Melvin Potillo used to tell us stories about freedom rides through the South to stir our souls.I don't know if anybody here remembers freedom rides anymore, or finds them honorable if they do. The evidence is not encouraging. But a long time ago, when a generation thought Martin Luther King's dream was the articulation of the true American ideal, we'd listen to Melvin's stories of integrating the South and think we were listening to the future.
NEWS
July 9, 1997
Gloster B. Current, 84, former deputy executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, died Thursday of leukemia and pneumonia at North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College in Forest Hills, N.Y., said his daughter, Angella.Current's career with the NAACP spanned more than half a century of turbulence and achievement in the civil rights movement. That period saw the desegregation of the armed forces, public schools and public transportation; sit-ins, freedom rides, marches and boycotts; legislation to end discrimination in voting, jobs and public accommodation; and, in 1967, the appointment of Thurgood Marshall as the first black Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2005
Honoring the "freedom rides" and the Montgomery, Ala., bus boycott led by Martin Luther King Jr., Annapolis Transit will offer free bus rides to the public tomorrow, starting before dawn and ending at 10 p.m. The one-day ridership program is a way to mark King's birthday, a national holiday, and his legacy of peaceful social change, Annapolis officials said. When Rosa Parks, a Montgomery woman, refused to give up her seat and move to the back of the bus one day in 1955, she sparked a boycott that heralded the civil rights movement and the struggle against segregation.
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