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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Harford Community College will air "Freedom Riders," a PBS documentary depicting one aspect of the Civil Rights era in America, at 2 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday. A discussion led by guest speakers, who were themselves freedom riders in the 1960s, will follow the showings, which are free and open to the public, in Room 243 of the college's Student Center. The event foreshadows a six-state, spring break trip, titled "Civil Rights Tour of the South – A Sojourn of the Past," set for 10 days in March.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2013
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African-American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. In none of those things was he unique, so no, his name should ring no bells.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
Thirty years ago, Delores Orey bravely opened her home to the "freedom riders" traveling through the South to challenge segregationist policies. So when the NAACP recently called for a new group of freedom riders to head North and get out the vote, the 61-year-old Mississippi grandmother boarded the bus.Yesterday, the bus carrying Mrs. Orey stopped at the Baltimore headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to pick up...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Harford Community College will air "Freedom Riders," a PBS documentary depicting one aspect of the Civil Rights era in America, at 2 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday. A discussion led by guest speakers, who were themselves freedom riders in the 1960s, will follow the showings, which are free and open to the public, in Room 243 of the college's Student Center. The event foreshadows a six-state, spring break trip, titled "Civil Rights Tour of the South – A Sojourn of the Past," set for 10 days in March.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | August 11, 1991
President Bush looked distinctly uncomfortable as he paused between golf shots at his Kennebunkport vacation retreat last week to explain why he didn't believe the federal courts had the authority to protect the constitutional rights of women and doctors in Wichita, Kan.Putting on his best golly-gee manner, the president said he sure hoped the anti-abortion extremists in Wichita would comport themselves "within the law of the land," which they certainly had...
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1998
"The Children," by David Halberstam. Random House. 745 pages.$29.95.On Feb. 1, 1960, the children struck. Four black men, all of them freshmen at North Carolina A & T in Greensboro, N.C., walked up the local Woolworth's, bought a couple of items, then sat down at the lunch counter and ordered coffee.Of course, they were refused. But their simple, defiant act ignited a new era in the civil rights movement. Other sit-insbegan after Greensboro. With each one, black and white college students entered the fight against segregation.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | April 4, 2013
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African-American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. In none of those things was he unique, so no, his name should ring no bells.
NEWS
By Gary May | June 13, 2005
THE BODY OF Emmett Till, murdered in Mississippi 50 years ago for allegedly whistling at a white woman, was exhumed this month for an autopsy, part of the Justice Department's decision to re-examine that ancient case. And today, Edgar Ray Killen, called "Preacher" by his colleagues in the Ku Klux Klan, is scheduled to go on trial in a Mississippi courtroom in connection with the murder of three civil rights workers in 1964. His prosecution, like the Till investigation, is part of what David Halberstam calls "little Nurembergs," the reopening of the civil rights era's cold cases in an effort to bring closure to the victims' families and send the message that racially motivated murder will never be permitted.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
Nonviolence, a potent force in the 1960s fight for civil rights, has become an "embarrassment, an instrument of the weak," lamented Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch. Seated in a wing chair Sunday afternoon in the chancel of First and Franklin Presbyterian Church in Mount Vernon, the author described how the strategy has fallen from favor. The Atlanta-born Branch, the son of a dry cleaner, wrote three books on the life of civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. He was later invited by President Bill Clinton for a series of lengthy interviews at the White House for a work on Clinton's presidency.
NEWS
December 23, 1997
The Rev. Ernest Bromley,85, a war resister and one of the original Freedom Riders who spoke against racial segregation in the South, died of cancer Dec. 17 in Cincinnati.Leo August,83, who developed a boyhood stamp collection and a fascination with airplanes into a prominent philatelic publishing house, died Dec. 4 in Livingston, N.J.Pub Date: 12/24/97
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
Nonviolence, a potent force in the 1960s fight for civil rights, has become an "embarrassment, an instrument of the weak," lamented Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch. Seated in a wing chair Sunday afternoon in the chancel of First and Franklin Presbyterian Church in Mount Vernon, the author described how the strategy has fallen from favor. The Atlanta-born Branch, the son of a dry cleaner, wrote three books on the life of civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. He was later invited by President Bill Clinton for a series of lengthy interviews at the White House for a work on Clinton's presidency.
NEWS
By Gary May | June 13, 2005
THE BODY OF Emmett Till, murdered in Mississippi 50 years ago for allegedly whistling at a white woman, was exhumed this month for an autopsy, part of the Justice Department's decision to re-examine that ancient case. And today, Edgar Ray Killen, called "Preacher" by his colleagues in the Ku Klux Klan, is scheduled to go on trial in a Mississippi courtroom in connection with the murder of three civil rights workers in 1964. His prosecution, like the Till investigation, is part of what David Halberstam calls "little Nurembergs," the reopening of the civil rights era's cold cases in an effort to bring closure to the victims' families and send the message that racially motivated murder will never be permitted.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1998
"The Children," by David Halberstam. Random House. 745 pages.$29.95.On Feb. 1, 1960, the children struck. Four black men, all of them freshmen at North Carolina A & T in Greensboro, N.C., walked up the local Woolworth's, bought a couple of items, then sat down at the lunch counter and ordered coffee.Of course, they were refused. But their simple, defiant act ignited a new era in the civil rights movement. Other sit-insbegan after Greensboro. With each one, black and white college students entered the fight against segregation.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
Thirty years ago, Delores Orey bravely opened her home to the "freedom riders" traveling through the South to challenge segregationist policies. So when the NAACP recently called for a new group of freedom riders to head North and get out the vote, the 61-year-old Mississippi grandmother boarded the bus.Yesterday, the bus carrying Mrs. Orey stopped at the Baltimore headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to pick up...
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | August 11, 1991
President Bush looked distinctly uncomfortable as he paused between golf shots at his Kennebunkport vacation retreat last week to explain why he didn't believe the federal courts had the authority to protect the constitutional rights of women and doctors in Wichita, Kan.Putting on his best golly-gee manner, the president said he sure hoped the anti-abortion extremists in Wichita would comport themselves "within the law of the land," which they certainly had...
FEATURES
May 4, 2000
Today in history: May 4 In 1626, Dutch explorer Peter Minuit landed on present-day Manhattan Island. In 1776, Rhode Island declared its freedom from England, two months before the Declaration of Independence was adopted. In 1886, at Haymarket Square in Chicago, a labor demon- stration for an eight-hour workday turned into a riot when a bomb exploded. In 1927, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was founded. In 1961, a group of "Freedom Riders" left Washington for New Orleans to challenge racial segregation in interstate buses and bus terminals.
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