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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 9, 2002
MOSCOW - When the novelist and short story writer Viktor Yerofeyev dared to publish an anthology of unauthorized literary works in 1979, Soviet authorities accused him of producing "pornography." He was then barred from publishing a word of his writing for eight years. Now, at the age of 55, Yerofeyev, an author who mixes the philosophical and the erotic, is once again the target of a moral crusade. The author is being harassed not by dour agents of the KGB but by a nationwide association of students known as Moving Together, who revere the country's president, Vladimir V. Putin - a dour former agent of the KGB. Like the Communist Party's guardians of public morals, Moving Together finds Yerofeyev's sardonic view of Russian society offensive to the point of being obscene.
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NEWS
By Bridget Kustin | February 24, 2014
"Freedom of expression is the heartbeat of our university," Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels and Provost Robert C. Lieberman declared in an email this month announcing a new Task Force on Academic Freedom that will formulate an "official set of principles that can give expression to our core values in this area. " The email makes the case for JHU's "special kinship with academic freedom" through one particular example: Philosophy professor Arthur Lovejoy's disagreement with a trustee while at Stanford had earned him a "troublemaker" reputation, but JHU hired him anyway.
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FEATURES
December 30, 1990
The arts were often front-page news during 1990 as the debate over censorship and freedom of expression found its way into the spotlight. But that's not all that drew attention during the last 12 months. Here's what our critics like to remember about the past year -- and some things they'd rather forget.
NEWS
August 12, 2012
Regarding Charlotte Eliopoulos' letter, we all have the right to freedom of speech, even if that means protesting a business owner's beliefs. We also are free not to support his franchises ("Chick-fil-Acontroversy raises free speech issues," Aug. 7). If company CEO Dan Cathy wants to express his beliefs I accept his right to have them, but he also has to accept my choice not to purchase his products anymore. Joseph Kortash, Catonsville
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | September 23, 1990
THE AMERICAN people, God bless them, are a mixed-up bunch. On this business of "censorship," they are as giddy as barnyard geese. In one breath they reject censorship; in the next they embrace it. What in the name of Thomas Jefferson is going on?The question is prompted by a poll released last week by the newly organized Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression. The center's director, Robert O'Neil, figured his first task would be to find out how the American people feel about freedom of expression.
NEWS
January 24, 1994
Few freedoms are more basic to our political system tha freedom of expression. It's hard to imagine representative government working at all without it. That's why it is all the more perplexing when the different forms of expression collide. That's what is involved in the sporadic trashing of student newspapers by minority students who feel aggrieved by something that was published.Universities, of all places, are sanctuaries for the free exchange of ideas. Does that exchange have limits?
NEWS
November 3, 1993
Officials at the University of Maryland College Park must issue an unmistakably clear and forceful condemnation of the theft Monday of 10,000 copies of the Diamondback, the daily newspaper produced by College Park students.The university has long been on the record with strongly worded policies against these types of acts. In 1990, it released a "Statement on Freedom of Expression" that prohibits interference with speech. For more than a decade, the Code of Student Conduct has forbidden deeds that "substantially [hinder]
NEWS
By GRAGORY KANE | October 24, 1998
I open the envelope, remove the card, and there it is: a horse's rump staring at me."Thinking of you," the caption inside reads. Underneath is a handwritten message from the sender who identified himself -- or perhaps herself -- only as L.F.E."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 16, 1997
Whenever I speak to high school students, nothing sends them into fits of guffawing more than the notion that their elders, in our never-ending quest to protect them from the ravages of gangsta rap, think that the group 2 Live Crew is a gangsta rap outfit.Oh, how the young folks snicker and giggle! But their elders, having put our feet in our mouths once too often on this issue, have solved the problem. We'll simply redefine reality. That'll show the whippersnappers.In an article Thursday, Sun staff writer C. Fraser Smith reported on the latest goings on in Annapolis.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 24, 1997
If there is a material object more inhumane, more unacceptable by every standard of decency, than a "snuff film," a resolute search of my mind fails to suggest it. A recorded moving image of the calculated, planned killing of a human being for the sake of satisfying perverse lust - whether immediate or to be played for a subsequent audience - is ultimate.For decades, there has been talk of such films, in the trade of contraband and among twisted people in a shadow world of arts and fashion.
NEWS
February 13, 2006
Don't limit freedom to seek sensitivity There is a dangerous trend, often reinforced by the media and politicians, to "split the difference," to be "fair and balanced" or to "capture the middle." But when an important debate is treated in a fashion designed only to produce compromise, this approach can violate both reason and progress. For example, those who believe the world is round should not be told to modify their position or to try and find a middle ground because their beliefs are offensive to those who still are convinced the world is flat.
NEWS
November 30, 2003
IT'S WHERE journalists are most needed that they're most abused. Governments don't torture, murder or jail journalists in quiet countries where little is happening, or in noisy countries where there are a thousand and one competing voices. Journalists are most on the line in places where the truth is precious, where it is a matter of life and death. Last week the Committee to Protect Journalists presented its International Press Freedom Awards, at an only slightly incongruous black-tie dinner in New York.
NEWS
By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 28, 2003
CHICAGO - Should homosexuals be hired as teachers? One outspoken Internet pundit says no. But his opinion has fueled a controversy over academic freedom of expression because it is posted on a site maintained by the writer's employer, a state university. Hiring gay teachers "puts the fox into the chicken coop," Eric Rasmusen wrote on his Web log, or "blog," on Aug. 26. "Male homosexuals, at least, like boys and are generally promiscuous," he continued. "They should not be given the opportunity to satisfy their desires."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 9, 2002
MOSCOW - When the novelist and short story writer Viktor Yerofeyev dared to publish an anthology of unauthorized literary works in 1979, Soviet authorities accused him of producing "pornography." He was then barred from publishing a word of his writing for eight years. Now, at the age of 55, Yerofeyev, an author who mixes the philosophical and the erotic, is once again the target of a moral crusade. The author is being harassed not by dour agents of the KGB but by a nationwide association of students known as Moving Together, who revere the country's president, Vladimir V. Putin - a dour former agent of the KGB. Like the Communist Party's guardians of public morals, Moving Together finds Yerofeyev's sardonic view of Russian society offensive to the point of being obscene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and By Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 1, 2002
The hallmark of American politics, dissent is the keystone of U.S. democracy. Every movement for social change in the U.S. has been predicated on dissent; every evolution of our democracy, including the abolition of slavery, the emancipation of women and the incorporation of civil rights for the disenfranchised, has been heralded by dissent. Yet increasingly since Sept. 11, freedom of speech is under threat. Attorney General John Ashcroft has asserted that dissent is unpatriotic. President Bush has implied the same in his quest for support for a war against Iraq, demanding politicians and the nation "speak with one voice" -- his. But doesn't differentiated discourse make for a stronger democracy?
NEWS
April 18, 2002
WE FIND CHILD pornography abhorrent, whether it is real or "virtual." Substituting childlike adult actors or computer-generated characters so lifelike as to fool the eye does not make this brand of smut any less repugnant. So when the Supreme Court ruled this week to protect free speech in cases where no child is exploited in the manufacture or marketing of child pornography, we nodded in support and winced at the same time. The Child Pornography Prevention Act of 1996 had over-reached, sweeping into the same gutter the abuse of children for adult entertainment and popular and literary images in which there "appear to be" minors having sex. It made no distinction between a coming-of-age tale like American Beauty, a masterwork of art and a pedophile's video collection.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 23, 1990
WAVERLY, Tenn. -- It was in the parking lot of the Piggly Wiggly not far from Loretta Lynn's dude ranch that Tommy Turner recently concluded that the country had gone to h - - l.Who but the devil could account for the lyrics the 48-year-old county Farm Bureau manager heard blaring from a car radio that day?"
NEWS
November 30, 2003
IT'S WHERE journalists are most needed that they're most abused. Governments don't torture, murder or jail journalists in quiet countries where little is happening, or in noisy countries where there are a thousand and one competing voices. Journalists are most on the line in places where the truth is precious, where it is a matter of life and death. Last week the Committee to Protect Journalists presented its International Press Freedom Awards, at an only slightly incongruous black-tie dinner in New York.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
MILLINGTON -- Who said everyone loves a parade?Residents of this historic Kent County town are learning how wrong that old saying is, as they grapple with a dispute about whether to allow a gay pride march in their midst.They also are chewing over the meaning of another chestnut, something about "the right of the people peaceably to assemble."An openly gay 21-year-old resident has sparked another skirmish in the nation's culture wars by declaring that he wants to hold a parade celebrating homosexuality through these picturesque streets at the headwaters of the Chester River.
NEWS
By GRAGORY KANE | October 24, 1998
I open the envelope, remove the card, and there it is: a horse's rump staring at me."Thinking of you," the caption inside reads. Underneath is a handwritten message from the sender who identified himself -- or perhaps herself -- only as L.F.E."
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