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By Boston Globe | July 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A key Senate panel has approved legislation establishing the right to an abortion in federal law, defying last-minute action by opponents intended to halt the bill.The move by the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee sent the measure, called the Freedom of Choice Act, to the full Senate. A twin bill was approved by a crucial House committee Tuesday, but the legislation faces an expected veto from President Bush.Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., the committee's chairman, pledged action on the bill this month.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | September 9, 2013
There is a certain freedom in knowing that, no matter what you do, you will make someone mad. That is the situation in which President Barack Obama finds himself regarding Syria: he has no good options, so he is free to simply choose the one he believes is right. He believes the government of Syrian strongman Bashar Assad must pay a price for using chemical weapons on its own people. He believes that price should be a missile strike delivered from U.S. warships because no one else is willing to stand up for the mandates of international law that have long said the use of chemical weapons is abhorrent.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 23, 1997
This morning the scuzziest crack dealer on North Caroline Street wakes up and calls himself an idiot. All these years, he should have reached for a lobbyist instead of a lawyer. And every heroin trafficker at the Maryland Penitentiary and every seller of marijuana marking time at the House of Correction peers around his prison bars and tells himself, Political payoffs, you moron! That's where you went wrong!Last Thursday afternoon, in Washington, the Liggett Group Inc., makers of Chesterfields, dodging 22 state lawsuits (including Maryland's)
NEWS
December 17, 2008
Protect consumers in electricity choices I hope that all of our state legislators are paying close attention to the possibility of re-regulating Maryland's electricity markets ("PSC: No turning back," Dec. 12). The current economic times are causing many taxpayers a great deal of pain. The Public Service Commission and the legislature must come up with a plan to deal with electricity that will prevent blackouts as well as bring cheaper electricity to ratepayers. The article quotes one of Maryland's legislative leaders as saying, "as these negotiations go forward, you're going to get a flavor from MidAmerican or EDF [Electricite de France]
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Congress may soon have to decide whether to legislate abortion rights -- an issue that its members, wary of prodding a hornets' nest, have succeeded in ducking for the last two years.The "Freedom of Choice Act" -- one of two identical pro-abortion rights bills that have been languishing in House and Senate committees since 1990 -- drew sharp debate in a House Judiciary subcommittee yesterday. Legal experts, legislators and activists sparred over the constitutionality -- and morality -- of such a law.Hanging over all the wrangling, though, was the knowledge that even if the bill clears the House, survives a likely filibuster attempt and wins approval in the Senate, it is bound to be vetoed by President Bush.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | December 22, 1991
Last week, we marked the 200th anniversary of the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution.I say "marked" because we have less to celebrate than we might.Racism and intolerance are as endemic to our culture as ever. Sexism rages. Homophobia is stylish in many communities.What's new?Closer to home, religious intolerance, always sub rosa in our county, has surfaced in the usual way. So much for the First Amendment.A recent survey commissioned by the American Bar Association reveals that only 33 percent of us even know what the Bill of Rights is. AsPogo oft noted, "We have met the enemy, and he is us."
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO | November 26, 2006
JEAN POOL 5616 Newbury St. Hours: 10 a.m. -7 p.m. Monday through Saturday; 11a.m. - 4 p.m. Sundays (through Dec. 31) 410-466-1177 Everybody into the jean pool! Owners Scott Wable and Josh Dunkin have installed a bit of L.A.-inspired casual glitz in Mount Washington with their airy new store, jean pool, where denim is the star. "We're bringing the West Coast to the East Coast," says Wable, who claims 50 pairs of jeans (and counting) in his personal collection. Inspiration struck Wable when he worked at Ruth Shaw, where couture clients spoke of the need for appropriate dress for waiting in carpool lines at their children's schools.
NEWS
December 17, 2008
Protect consumers in electricity choices I hope that all of our state legislators are paying close attention to the possibility of re-regulating Maryland's electricity markets ("PSC: No turning back," Dec. 12). The current economic times are causing many taxpayers a great deal of pain. The Public Service Commission and the legislature must come up with a plan to deal with electricity that will prevent blackouts as well as bring cheaper electricity to ratepayers. The article quotes one of Maryland's legislative leaders as saying, "as these negotiations go forward, you're going to get a flavor from MidAmerican or EDF [Electricite de France]
NEWS
December 15, 1991
Editor's note: Red and white lanterns will brighten many Main Streetin many Carroll County communities this holiday season. And most of the time, taxpayers are footing the bill. In Union Bridge, for example, the Town Council -- meeting in an illegally closed session -- voted to spend $7,857 to purchase and install lights; officials had budgeted $20,000. Other examples include Westminster spending $3,200 and Taneytown, $2,899. Electricity costs are additional. The American Civil Liberties Union says towns should not spend money celebrating a religious holiday.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- At first blush, it would appear that conservative Supreme Court Justice Byron R. White's decision to retire means the long controversy over abortion rights will at last be shunted to the sidelines, with President Clinton expected to fill the vacancy with a pro-choice nominee.The president in his news conference the other day said he wouldn't ask any nominee how he or she would vote on a particular issue. But he made clear he would want him or her to be a strong protector of the individual's rights of privacy.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO | November 26, 2006
JEAN POOL 5616 Newbury St. Hours: 10 a.m. -7 p.m. Monday through Saturday; 11a.m. - 4 p.m. Sundays (through Dec. 31) 410-466-1177 Everybody into the jean pool! Owners Scott Wable and Josh Dunkin have installed a bit of L.A.-inspired casual glitz in Mount Washington with their airy new store, jean pool, where denim is the star. "We're bringing the West Coast to the East Coast," says Wable, who claims 50 pairs of jeans (and counting) in his personal collection. Inspiration struck Wable when he worked at Ruth Shaw, where couture clients spoke of the need for appropriate dress for waiting in carpool lines at their children's schools.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 23, 1997
This morning the scuzziest crack dealer on North Caroline Street wakes up and calls himself an idiot. All these years, he should have reached for a lobbyist instead of a lawyer. And every heroin trafficker at the Maryland Penitentiary and every seller of marijuana marking time at the House of Correction peers around his prison bars and tells himself, Political payoffs, you moron! That's where you went wrong!Last Thursday afternoon, in Washington, the Liggett Group Inc., makers of Chesterfields, dodging 22 state lawsuits (including Maryland's)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
Here's how you leave Las Vegas, at least in the context of Mike Figgis' corrosive film "Leaving Las Vegas": You leave it in a box. For a movie about characters enmeshed in a downward swirl toward oblivion, however, it's weirdly upbeat. It is, in some nihilistic sense, about freedom. Having chosen self-destruction as a life-style, its characters are liberated to pursue that end without equivocation, self-pity or sentimentality. No tremor of indecision clouds their judgment. In exactly the opposite sense of the preachy Nike commercial, they just do it. (The film is playing exclusively at the Charles.
NEWS
December 10, 1995
THE SUPREME COURT has long held that, while a woman has a constitutional right to an abortion, she does not have a right to a free abortion. That is still the case, but last week the court pleased supporters of abortion-rights by refusing to hear an appeal from the state of Colorado, which wanted to impose tighter restrictions on Medicaid-funded abortions than Congress has allowed.The action was no surprise. Ever since Congress imposed restrictions on Medicaid abortions in the early 1980s, refusing to pay for any abortions other than those necessary to save the life of the mother, the Supreme Court has upheld those restrictions.
NEWS
August 7, 1995
Look at SudanThere has been a commendable job by the various forms of media in focusing on the shameful actions taking place in Bosnia.The focus at least forces countries such as ours to grope at meaningful ways to bring an end to the suffering.However, there is barbarism of an even larger scale going on in the Sudan, and scant attention is paid to it by any of the media.Several million people have been driven from their homes, and more than 2 million people have been slaughtered.People are being tortured and many are even being crucified.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- At first blush, it would appear that conservative Supreme Court Justice Byron R. White's decision to retire means the long controversy over abortion rights will at last be shunted to the sidelines, with President Clinton expected to fill the vacancy with a pro-choice nominee.The president in his news conference the other day said he wouldn't ask any nominee how he or she would vote on a particular issue. But he made clear he would want him or her to be a strong protector of the individual's rights of privacy.
NEWS
By TRB | November 19, 1992
Washington. -- On most aspects of public policy, Bill Clinton and others have done a great job of ''repositioning'' -- as they say in the ad biz -- the Democratic Party. On foreign policy, the party is no longer perceived as a bunch of weak-kneed appeasers. On domestic policy, the party has shaken off its image of a mindless propensity to ''tax and spend.''In one area, though, Democratic Party thinking has not changed much. That is its attitude toward judges and the proper use of the Constitution.
NEWS
February 18, 1992
Instruction TimeEditor: An innocent victim? Maybe, Maybe not. A star-struck 18-year-old is lured to the clutches of a ruthless rapist. The jury says he is guilty. Only the two of them know for sure.The one good thing that evolved from all of this is that parents can use the situation to communicate to their children. The issue of date rape and avoiding compromising positions can be discussed. "Does no mean no?" can be discussed. What responsibility did the young lady have in the situation, or is she absolved of all responsibility?
NEWS
By TRB | November 19, 1992
Washington. -- On most aspects of public policy, Bill Clinton and others have done a great job of ''repositioning'' -- as they say in the ad biz -- the Democratic Party. On foreign policy, the party is no longer perceived as a bunch of weak-kneed appeasers. On domestic policy, the party has shaken off its image of a mindless propensity to ''tax and spend.''In one area, though, Democratic Party thinking has not changed much. That is its attitude toward judges and the proper use of the Constitution.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | August 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Democrats are beginning to have some second thoughts about their plan to force President Bush into a politically embarrassing veto of an abortion rights bill. The obvious explanation is that they have been reading the opinion polls.The original plan hatched by the Democrats was to pass the so-called "Freedom of Choice Act" early enough so that the president would be obliged to veto it, as he has pledged he will do, before the Republican National Convention opens in Houston Aug. 17. Such a strategy, they figured, might exacerbate the tensions over the abortion question already expected to be prominently on display at the convention.
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