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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
For Robert Spalding, home is a two-story brick house on the grounds of a state mental hospital in Sykesville. There, he and several dozen other mentally ill residents have formed deep friendships in the past decade, celebrating one another's birthdays, planting chrysanthemums and decorating the walls with bright posters."
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NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 11, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A day after being placed under house arrest, former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto drove through the streets of Pakistan's capital yesterday, stopping several times to get out of her bulletproof SUV and shake hands. But police stopped her from meeting the country's suspended chief justice. Bhutto's short road trip could mean that the government is trying to improve its poor public image since embattled President Pervez Musharraf declared a state of emergency Nov. 3. The country's attorney general also said the emergency would last only a month, although other government officials said the timeline is not yet certain.
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NEWS
By JOHN HUGHES | January 14, 1994
Has the world's dramatic explosion of democracy that began in 1989 run out of steam? We cannot yet write off the trend that started with the freeing of Eastern Europe, the collapse of the Berlin wall, and the breakup of the Soviet Union. But there are troubling signs.Each year Freedom House, the respected New York-based human rights organization, monitors the course of freedom around the world. It recently reported bleakly on 1993. Ethnic violence and political repression made it the worst single-year setback for freedom since 1972.
NEWS
By Justin Martin | September 21, 2007
During the reign of Saddam Hussein, the Iraqi newspaper Azzaman could only be published in London. Fleeing the government's muscular arm in the 1990s, the newspaper's founder, former Hussein aide Saad al-Bazzaz, was forced to run his media operation out of Europe for nearly a decade. But after Mr. Hussein's expulsion in 2003, Mr. al-Bazzaz set up offices in Baghdad, and he has since been busy running what is considered Iraq's most credible Arabic publication. With a daily circulation of more than 75,000, Azzaman is a modern journalistic success story and a publication that has added greater depth to the political debate in Iraq.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | January 17, 1999
THE WALLS OF century-old Springfield Hospital Center are tumbling down -- literally and figuratively.The state mental institution three years ago spun off 720 acres of the unused Martin Gross section to the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services for use as a statewide police training facility.The town of Sykesville annexed another 132 acres of surplus hospital land last fall, with plans to redevelop it for residential and commercial use. That Warfield complex includes 15 vacant, aging buildings that need millions of dollars in renovations.
NEWS
June 1, 2006
The Center for Religious Freedom in Washington has put to the test Saudi Arabia's claims that it has reformed its educational system of teachings that demonize the West and non-Muslims. If the Saudi textbooks reviewed by the center represent the kingdom's reforms, the Saudi government shouldn't get a passing grade. The survey of a dozen textbooks of Islamic studies found ample examples of intolerance and hatred for Christians, Jews and other Muslims who don't practice the fundamentalist form of Islam, Wahhabism, that is supported by the Saudi government.
NEWS
December 27, 1998
State is misguided in its plan to close Freedom HouseI am writing in regard to the article "Closing of home for mentally ill criticized" (Dec. 1), which reports on the state's plan to close Freedom House, the home for persons with mental illness on the grounds of Springfield State Hospital.Maryland should shift its housing priorities for those with serious mental illness from "deinstitutionalizing" people who have roofs over their heads in structured environments to finding housing and services for mentally ill people.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | December 31, 2002
CHICAGO - On March 20, 22-year-old Salim Ahmedi did something he'd never done before: He went to a party. Not a big deal in most places, but the medical student lives in Kabul, which until last year was ruled by the fanatically medieval Taliban regime. "Now that Afghanistan is free," he told a reporter, "I think we will have more parties like this one." They're not the only people celebrating. This was a year in which many people around the world got to do things their governments had not allowed them to do before, particularly letting them choose their own governments.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | December 24, 2004
CHICAGO - Saddam Hussein ends this year where he began it, in a jail cell awaiting prosecution for crimes against humanity. But he may be relieved to hear that the delay is for his own good. "This is going to be, probably, the trial of the century, and we have to get it right," said Iraqi national security adviser Mouwafak al-Rubaie. "We can't suddenly try and sentence him to either life in prison or whatever, execute him 100 times, as some people want to do." This time last year, Iraq was under U.S. military occupation, awaiting the arrival of democracy and gripped by violent turmoil.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jackie Powder contributed to this article | November 1, 1998
Salvatore Gugilizza, the oldest patient at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville whose gentle ways and many kindnesses touched staff and patients, died there Monday of pneumonia. He was 102.Mr. Gugilizza, who was also the oldest patient in the state's entire psychiatric health system, was admitted to Springfield in 1929, then a 32-year-old Italian immigrant who had been diagnosed with dementia praecox -- the former term for schizophrenia.His life there spanned the eras from the days when mental hospitals seemed little more than "snake pits" or "lunatic asylums" to a time of anti-psychotic drugs to manage mental illness and programs bringing the mentally ill back into their communities and productive lives.
NEWS
June 1, 2006
The Center for Religious Freedom in Washington has put to the test Saudi Arabia's claims that it has reformed its educational system of teachings that demonize the West and non-Muslims. If the Saudi textbooks reviewed by the center represent the kingdom's reforms, the Saudi government shouldn't get a passing grade. The survey of a dozen textbooks of Islamic studies found ample examples of intolerance and hatred for Christians, Jews and other Muslims who don't practice the fundamentalist form of Islam, Wahhabism, that is supported by the Saudi government.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | December 24, 2004
CHICAGO - Saddam Hussein ends this year where he began it, in a jail cell awaiting prosecution for crimes against humanity. But he may be relieved to hear that the delay is for his own good. "This is going to be, probably, the trial of the century, and we have to get it right," said Iraqi national security adviser Mouwafak al-Rubaie. "We can't suddenly try and sentence him to either life in prison or whatever, execute him 100 times, as some people want to do." This time last year, Iraq was under U.S. military occupation, awaiting the arrival of democracy and gripped by violent turmoil.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | December 31, 2002
CHICAGO - On March 20, 22-year-old Salim Ahmedi did something he'd never done before: He went to a party. Not a big deal in most places, but the medical student lives in Kabul, which until last year was ruled by the fanatically medieval Taliban regime. "Now that Afghanistan is free," he told a reporter, "I think we will have more parties like this one." They're not the only people celebrating. This was a year in which many people around the world got to do things their governments had not allowed them to do before, particularly letting them choose their own governments.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | January 17, 1999
THE WALLS OF century-old Springfield Hospital Center are tumbling down -- literally and figuratively.The state mental institution three years ago spun off 720 acres of the unused Martin Gross section to the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services for use as a statewide police training facility.The town of Sykesville annexed another 132 acres of surplus hospital land last fall, with plans to redevelop it for residential and commercial use. That Warfield complex includes 15 vacant, aging buildings that need millions of dollars in renovations.
NEWS
December 27, 1998
State is misguided in its plan to close Freedom HouseI am writing in regard to the article "Closing of home for mentally ill criticized" (Dec. 1), which reports on the state's plan to close Freedom House, the home for persons with mental illness on the grounds of Springfield State Hospital.Maryland should shift its housing priorities for those with serious mental illness from "deinstitutionalizing" people who have roofs over their heads in structured environments to finding housing and services for mentally ill people.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
For Robert Spalding, home is a two-story brick house on the grounds of a state mental hospital in Sykesville. There, he and several dozen other mentally ill residents have formed deep friendships in the past decade, celebrating one another's birthdays, planting chrysanthemums and decorating the walls with bright posters."
NEWS
By Justin Martin | September 21, 2007
During the reign of Saddam Hussein, the Iraqi newspaper Azzaman could only be published in London. Fleeing the government's muscular arm in the 1990s, the newspaper's founder, former Hussein aide Saad al-Bazzaz, was forced to run his media operation out of Europe for nearly a decade. But after Mr. Hussein's expulsion in 2003, Mr. al-Bazzaz set up offices in Baghdad, and he has since been busy running what is considered Iraq's most credible Arabic publication. With a daily circulation of more than 75,000, Azzaman is a modern journalistic success story and a publication that has added greater depth to the political debate in Iraq.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 11, 2007
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- A day after being placed under house arrest, former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto drove through the streets of Pakistan's capital yesterday, stopping several times to get out of her bulletproof SUV and shake hands. But police stopped her from meeting the country's suspended chief justice. Bhutto's short road trip could mean that the government is trying to improve its poor public image since embattled President Pervez Musharraf declared a state of emergency Nov. 3. The country's attorney general also said the emergency would last only a month, although other government officials said the timeline is not yet certain.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jackie Powder contributed to this article | November 1, 1998
Salvatore Gugilizza, the oldest patient at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville whose gentle ways and many kindnesses touched staff and patients, died there Monday of pneumonia. He was 102.Mr. Gugilizza, who was also the oldest patient in the state's entire psychiatric health system, was admitted to Springfield in 1929, then a 32-year-old Italian immigrant who had been diagnosed with dementia praecox -- the former term for schizophrenia.His life there spanned the eras from the days when mental hospitals seemed little more than "snake pits" or "lunatic asylums" to a time of anti-psychotic drugs to manage mental illness and programs bringing the mentally ill back into their communities and productive lives.
NEWS
By JOHN HUGHES | January 14, 1994
Has the world's dramatic explosion of democracy that began in 1989 run out of steam? We cannot yet write off the trend that started with the freeing of Eastern Europe, the collapse of the Berlin wall, and the breakup of the Soviet Union. But there are troubling signs.Each year Freedom House, the respected New York-based human rights organization, monitors the course of freedom around the world. It recently reported bleakly on 1993. Ethnic violence and political repression made it the worst single-year setback for freedom since 1972.
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