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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | October 13, 1993
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Political groups with extremely different characteristics joined yesterday in a formal alliance to stop the country's march toward its first nonracial elections next year.The so-called Freedom Alliance consists of representatives of two white right-wing groups who seek a homeland for the Afrikaner people and the leaders of three black tribal homelands, nominally independent states set up by the apartheid government to deny blacks South African citizenship.They have all withdrawn from the Multi Party Talks that worked out the Transitional Executive Council (TEC)
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NEWS
By Loretta J. Ross | March 10, 1994
SOUTH Africa is at a crossroads. In April, it will have a general election that for the first time will permit black South Africans to vote. But the election process is menaced by right-wing groups, which threaten civil war.When I visited South Africa last September, I saw not only a political war of words, but a brutal, terrorist war -- and the casualties still are mounting. In the three years since Nelson Mandela was released from prison, more than 15,000 people have died. Will South Africans risk their lives to go to the polls?
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 23, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Hope has begun to fade that all parties will participate in South Africa's first nonracial election as the country awaits the official response of the Freedom Alliance to a last-ditch effort to satisfy its demands.The many deadlines throughout this process have been given little, if any, respect. But with the election just two months away, it seems likely that the amendments to the country's new constitution that are to be passed by Parliament next week will be the last.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 23, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Hope has begun to fade that all parties will participate in South Africa's first nonracial election as the country awaits the official response of the Freedom Alliance to a last-ditch effort to satisfy its demands.The many deadlines throughout this process have been given little, if any, respect. But with the election just two months away, it seems likely that the amendments to the country's new constitution that are to be passed by Parliament next week will be the last.
NEWS
February 20, 1994
Ordinarily, Goodwill Zwelithini, king of the Zulu nation, and his cousin Mangosuthu Buthelezi, prime minister of the KwaZulu homeland, are rivals for power. But suddenly they are allies.They both repudiate the future of South Africa to which most parties have agreed. The king supports the prime minister in urging a Zulu boycott of South Africa's first multi-racial election, in April, to choose a parliament that will write a constitution.More, the king claims all Zulu lands as they existed in 1834, when the Zulu military empire dominated other groups.
NEWS
December 11, 1993
As Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk, the odd couple of historic destiny, received their well-deserved Nobel Peace Prizes Oslo yesterday, South Africa was not the country it had long been. During the week, it changed utterly.On Tuesday in Cape Town, exclusively white minority rule ended. Mr. de Klerk promulgated the Transitional Executive Council (TEC) -- 32 members (only seven of them white) from 16 parties -- to oversee his government. Unfortunately, groups of black and white conservatives under the rubric of the Freedom Alliance stayed out after negotiations to include them had failed.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | September 18, 1990
In commercials surrounded by news,Chuck Yeager is selling B-2sUnseen by radar,' They're unlike a car --If you're looking for cash back, you lose.the Saudi Arabian grill,Time is what they are not trained to kill;To combat ennui,) All the troops get to seeAre tours from Capitol Hill.Bush keeps a sharp eye on the score:Opinions against versus for;But where will it end' If he follows the trendOf polls that say people want war?Saddam has been likened to Hitler,But his Luftwaffe is luckily littler;If we can frustrate$ His lust for Kuwait,Maybe peace won't be broken,just brittler.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 21, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Negotiators for the African National Congress (ANC) and the Afrikaner Volksfront (AVF) announced what was termed a "strategic interim agreement" yesterday that should allow the umbrella right-wing white group to participate in next April's election.The agreement was a breakthrough for the South African government, but talks remained deadlocked with the Freedom Alliance, a disparate group united only by a desire for greater local autonomy through a new constitution that is to be adopted tomorrow.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- South Africa's Parliament essentially voted itself out of existence yesterday, overwhelmingly approving a new constitution that clears the way for a government dominated by the country's black majority."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa faces its first multiracial election without the participation of several major political parties as the Inkatha Freedom Party joined the Afrikaner Volksfront in refusing to register for the vote.Last night was the deadline for parties to declare their participation in the April 27 election. Failure of these right-wing groups -- black and white -- to sign up makes it even more likely that the election will be subject to widespread violent disruptions.
NEWS
February 20, 1994
Ordinarily, Goodwill Zwelithini, king of the Zulu nation, and his cousin Mangosuthu Buthelezi, prime minister of the KwaZulu homeland, are rivals for power. But suddenly they are allies.They both repudiate the future of South Africa to which most parties have agreed. The king supports the prime minister in urging a Zulu boycott of South Africa's first multi-racial election, in April, to choose a parliament that will write a constitution.More, the king claims all Zulu lands as they existed in 1834, when the Zulu military empire dominated other groups.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1994
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa faces its first multiracial election without the participation of several major political parties as the Inkatha Freedom Party joined the Afrikaner Volksfront in refusing to register for the vote.Last night was the deadline for parties to declare their participation in the April 27 election. Failure of these right-wing groups -- black and white -- to sign up makes it even more likely that the election will be subject to widespread violent disruptions.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- South Africa's Parliament essentially voted itself out of existence yesterday, overwhelmingly approving a new constitution that clears the way for a government dominated by the country's black majority."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 21, 1993
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Negotiators for the African National Congress (ANC) and the Afrikaner Volksfront (AVF) announced what was termed a "strategic interim agreement" yesterday that should allow the umbrella right-wing white group to participate in next April's election.The agreement was a breakthrough for the South African government, but talks remained deadlocked with the Freedom Alliance, a disparate group united only by a desire for greater local autonomy through a new constitution that is to be adopted tomorrow.
NEWS
December 11, 1993
As Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk, the odd couple of historic destiny, received their well-deserved Nobel Peace Prizes Oslo yesterday, South Africa was not the country it had long been. During the week, it changed utterly.On Tuesday in Cape Town, exclusively white minority rule ended. Mr. de Klerk promulgated the Transitional Executive Council (TEC) -- 32 members (only seven of them white) from 16 parties -- to oversee his government. Unfortunately, groups of black and white conservatives under the rubric of the Freedom Alliance stayed out after negotiations to include them had failed.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 8, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- Meeting in a room where white men gathered for decades to keep them down, South Africa's black leaders formally grasped the tiller of political power here yesterday.How firm their grasp will be in the months leading up to April's first democratic election remains uncertain, but the initial meeting of the Transitional Executive Council (TEC) dominated by blacks clearly marked another major step toward the once unthinkable: a government representative of the country's overwhelming black majority.
NEWS
By Loretta J. Ross | March 10, 1994
SOUTH Africa is at a crossroads. In April, it will have a general election that for the first time will permit black South Africans to vote. But the election process is menaced by right-wing groups, which threaten civil war.When I visited South Africa last September, I saw not only a political war of words, but a brutal, terrorist war -- and the casualties still are mounting. In the three years since Nelson Mandela was released from prison, more than 15,000 people have died. Will South Africans risk their lives to go to the polls?
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | December 8, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- Meeting in a room where white men gathered for decades to keep them down, South Africa's black leaders formally grasped the tiller of political power here yesterday.How firm their grasp will be in the months leading up to April's first democratic election remains uncertain, but the initial meeting of the Transitional Executive Council (TEC) dominated by blacks clearly marked another major step toward the once unthinkable: a government representative of the country's overwhelming black majority.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | October 13, 1993
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Political groups with extremely different characteristics joined yesterday in a formal alliance to stop the country's march toward its first nonracial elections next year.The so-called Freedom Alliance consists of representatives of two white right-wing groups who seek a homeland for the Afrikaner people and the leaders of three black tribal homelands, nominally independent states set up by the apartheid government to deny blacks South African citizenship.They have all withdrawn from the Multi Party Talks that worked out the Transitional Executive Council (TEC)
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | September 18, 1990
In commercials surrounded by news,Chuck Yeager is selling B-2sUnseen by radar,' They're unlike a car --If you're looking for cash back, you lose.the Saudi Arabian grill,Time is what they are not trained to kill;To combat ennui,) All the troops get to seeAre tours from Capitol Hill.Bush keeps a sharp eye on the score:Opinions against versus for;But where will it end' If he follows the trendOf polls that say people want war?Saddam has been likened to Hitler,But his Luftwaffe is luckily littler;If we can frustrate$ His lust for Kuwait,Maybe peace won't be broken,just brittler.
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