Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFree Verse
IN THE NEWS

Free Verse

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1997
Free verse rules at the U.S. Naval Academy, an unlikely proving ground for young poets finding their sea legs.For the past 20 summers, the academy's creative writing journal Labyrinth has been the means of escape for the collective right brains of the Brigade. This month, the publication again features the selected poetry of midshipmen, selected by the midshipmen and published by the midshipmen."I was amazed at the volume of the stuff," says Lt. Chad Dorr, a faculty sponsor of the Labyrinth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 12, 2012
The National Portrait Gallery's new exhibition, “Poetic Likeness: Modern American Poets,” uses portraiture, biography and verse to explore the people who created a distinctive, American voice. Walt Whitman's free verse in "Leaves of Grass," (1855), was a shocking departure from literary tradition, the museum notes -- both for its form and for the inclusion of topics that described ordinary life. (That mirrors the equally shocking mid-century shift to realism by painters such as Courbet in France.)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1999
After his newspaper business failed, Whitman started on his best known work, "Leaves of Grass." It contains 12 untitled poems with a preface.The Civil War was a catalyst for other writings of Whitman's. He published his diary notes and sketches in "Memoranda During the War." He saw the effects of war firsthand through his enlisted brother.Much of Whitman's writing is on the cycle of life and death. He also used the Italian opera as an influence for his poetry. Whitman will be remembered as one of the first poets to use free verse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
"Black Nature" Camille Dungy, editor, University of Georgia Press, $17.96. Two groundbreaking anthologies pass the read-again test with several excellent poems by local poets. Camille Dungy believes that white and black poets look differently at nature, with whites primarily noticing its beauty and blacks seeing its harshness. The view, Dungy says, is intensified by the black experience of slavery. An edgy mix of pastoral and political, her anthology, "Black Nature," testifies to her point although a few poems seem somewhat heavy.
NEWS
November 17, 1995
Sports get too much of our attentionSports coverage appears to overshadow all matters of significant importance reported by the media. All the elaboration on this subject is causing the American people to appear superficial when there is such a preponderance of catastrophic events and other important matters in this world. Where are our priorities? Certainly not where they should be.Gloria WeyrichTimoniumFells Point is at a crossroadsIn the media there is a perception that Fells Point is little more than an extended watering hole for celebratory-minded college students and young professionals.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 12, 2012
The National Portrait Gallery's new exhibition, “Poetic Likeness: Modern American Poets,” uses portraiture, biography and verse to explore the people who created a distinctive, American voice. Walt Whitman's free verse in "Leaves of Grass," (1855), was a shocking departure from literary tradition, the museum notes -- both for its form and for the inclusion of topics that described ordinary life. (That mirrors the equally shocking mid-century shift to realism by painters such as Courbet in France.)
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | March 1, 1993
As a wife and mother of four, Helen Voris has cooked thousands of meals, attended school functions and presided over Girl Scout meetings. But after all those years, the 75-year-old Elkridge resident had nothing to show for it. She worried there was little to remind her now-grown children of her efforts."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2009
"Black Nature" Camille Dungy, editor, University of Georgia Press, $17.96. Two groundbreaking anthologies pass the read-again test with several excellent poems by local poets. Camille Dungy believes that white and black poets look differently at nature, with whites primarily noticing its beauty and blacks seeing its harshness. The view, Dungy says, is intensified by the black experience of slavery. An edgy mix of pastoral and political, her anthology, "Black Nature," testifies to her point although a few poems seem somewhat heavy.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | September 3, 1993
Members of the Poetry Forum want you to know: Poetry can be fun."You don't have to be somebody up on a pedestal with a book on a dusty shelf to enjoy poetry," member Dolores Maminski of Westminster said."
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | February 11, 1994
CAN'T beat the mail in this line of work: 20 pounds of documents in a class action suit, a list of questions from kids about violent lyrics in rap music, holy cards, invective, insults (sometimes all three from the same person), the occasional rebuttal in free verse, the heartfelt stories.But even amid the plaintive, the curious and the bizarre, the newsletter of the Living Truth Ministries in Austin, Texas, stands out.The newsletter, Flashpoint, is a kind of freewheeling smorgasbord of conspiracy theories, as mesmerizing as a hypnotist's watch.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
Poet Sue Ellen Thompson will lead a workshop that examines approaches to writing free verse at 1 p.m. May 16 at the Ellicott City Senior Center, 9401 Frederick Road, Ellicott City. Those who attend the workshop "How `Free' is Your Free Verse?" will have an opportunity to experiment with creating a free verse poem from a prose paragraph. Information: 410-313-1400. Miller branch offers Teen 'Zine The Miller branch library's Teen 'Zine program, in which youths ages 13-17 can contribute to a new online newsletter written by teens for teens, invites participants to meet at the library from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. May 12. To start, attend a meeting or make an appointment with the library's teen specialist.
FEATURES
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - One of them came from the wilderness of Washington state, where he lives in a wooden house he built with his own hands. The other came from the lush forests of Hawaii, where all he can see from his home are the trees and the sea. Both of them left their peaceful, quiet lives and traveled here to the nation's capital to hand-deliver the most poetic protestation of war in Iraq to date. Sam Hamill, of Port Townsend, Wash., and W.S. Merwin, of Hawaii, two of the country's most esteemed poets, arrived at the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill late yesterday morning to present members of Congress with an anthology of more than 13,000 anti-war poems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | January 13, 2002
Opinionated, respected and quick, Dennis Miller was picked in 2000 to resurrect the blend of irreverence and insight last heard on ABC's Monday Night Football from Howard Cosell. Many sports purists disagreed with the choice of the acerbic comic. On talk radio and in sports columns across the country, Miller received a rocky welcome. Ratings for MNF ebbed, and this year they dropped to all-time lows. But Miller, 48, who admitted he had attended only one professional football game before taking the job, calls his time in the booth with announcer Al Michaels and commentator Dan Fouts, a Hall of Fame quarterback, a success.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1999
After his newspaper business failed, Whitman started on his best known work, "Leaves of Grass." It contains 12 untitled poems with a preface.The Civil War was a catalyst for other writings of Whitman's. He published his diary notes and sketches in "Memoranda During the War." He saw the effects of war firsthand through his enlisted brother.Much of Whitman's writing is on the cycle of life and death. He also used the Italian opera as an influence for his poetry. Whitman will be remembered as one of the first poets to use free verse.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1997
Free verse rules at the U.S. Naval Academy, an unlikely proving ground for young poets finding their sea legs.For the past 20 summers, the academy's creative writing journal Labyrinth has been the means of escape for the collective right brains of the Brigade. This month, the publication again features the selected poetry of midshipmen, selected by the midshipmen and published by the midshipmen."I was amazed at the volume of the stuff," says Lt. Chad Dorr, a faculty sponsor of the Labyrinth.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Norine Osbon Fox has written three books of poetry, but has not earned one penny from their sales."It's too much trouble to make out those income tax forms," she joked from her home on Chincoteague Island, Va.The truth is that the former Pasadena resident has donated more than $1,200 from her first work, "Chincoteague Chanteys," to the Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills, N.J.The proceeds from her second work, "More Truth Than Poetry," will be...
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 12, 1992
Iwas getting ready to close for the night when a customer came by with a piece of correspondence that was giving him trouble."Don't know when I'll get to it," I told him. "I'm pretty backed up. Got an essay on Social Darwinism that needs body work, two columns that need polishing and a Bush satire that needs a complete overhaul."He seemed disappointed. But this time of year, everyone's writing seems to break down at once."What's the matter with your letter?" I asked."It's hard to describe," he said.
NEWS
November 17, 1995
Sports get too much of our attentionSports coverage appears to overshadow all matters of significant importance reported by the media. All the elaboration on this subject is causing the American people to appear superficial when there is such a preponderance of catastrophic events and other important matters in this world. Where are our priorities? Certainly not where they should be.Gloria WeyrichTimoniumFells Point is at a crossroadsIn the media there is a perception that Fells Point is little more than an extended watering hole for celebratory-minded college students and young professionals.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.