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By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | April 16, 1995
People don't go on vacation as much these days. Instead they "travel."Many women, when asked what they do with their leisure time, will say without a blink that they clean, do laundry, run errands.If someone stops to smell the roses during the day, you can bet it was scheduled last week and noted in an appointment book along with the meeting that follows it."Traditionally, we call the part of the day that isn't work time or sleep time, 'free time' or 'leisure time.' But the 'shoulds' -- 'I should do this, I should do that' -- are creeping into our leisure.
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NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | September 1, 2014
Ask some neighbors or colleagues about their Labor Day weekend tomorrow, and prepare to hear how busy it was. Several malls featured back to school sales, kids had a baseball tournament, lots of e-mails to catch up with at work, and the house needed some cleaning. We're too busy, goes the lament, to enjoy free time. Yet social scientists claim that the average work week for full-time employees since 1970 has fluctuated between 39 and 41 hours. This claim does include a range of variations.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Like horses brought to water who can't be made to drink, voters can't be forced to exercise the franchise if they don't want to. In last year's presidential election, more didn't vote than did -- only 49 percent of those eligible.The figure, according to Curtis Gans of the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate, resumed a 36-year decline in voter turnout, broken only in 1992.The regression after the 55.2 percent voter participation in the Clinton-Bush race in 1992 came in spite of a new experiment in the communication of candidate views: free television time on five networks: NBC, CBS, CNN, Fox and PBS.The campaign for free time was spearheaded by a former Washington Post political reporter, Paul Taylor, and the retired CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite.
NEWS
By Maher Kharma | October 7, 2013
It's 6:30 in the morning, and the alarm goes off. It's time for you to get in the shower so you can get ready for work and be at the office by 7:30. Your first few moves out of the bed are slowed down when you remember that you were furloughed and there is no rush to go anywhere. Instead, you have to figure out how to deal with the eight hours that you would have typically spent at work. You grab your cup of coffee and turn the TV on to watch the news, hoping that the government gridlock came to an end, but you find that no compromises were made for thousands of federal employees to return to work.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2007
The adage "The show must go on" has seldom reflected more tenacity, discipline, determination and passion than it does this season, with the unbroken 100-year history of theatrical productions at the Naval Academy. The Masqueraders will mark the troupe's centennial next month with two weekend presentations of Our Country's Good by Timberlake Wertenbaker, despite new academy regulations that cut into Mids' free time for extracurricular activities. The changes instituted by Vice Adm. Jeffrey Fowler require midshipmen to study nightly for three hours, which would have reduced the Masqueraders' rehearsal time by as much as half.
SPORTS
August 10, 2007
Good morning -- David Wells -- We can only imagine what you'll do with all this free time.
NEWS
By James Foley | May 21, 1996
TIME. IT FLIES. Tempus fugit. We try to make it, save it, take it. It waits for no one. It heals all wounds, and wounds all heels.If we feel generous, we volunteer it. After all, time is money.Consumers spend millions of dollars a year on devices to measure it. On-line services and 900 numbers charge for it. So do professionals, like lawyers. Judges hand it down and convicts do it, or it does them.Prison wardens do not care how inmates spend their time as long as no one tries to escape or hurt someone.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991
'Missed' timeA survey by the Metropolitan Chicago Information Center reports that 40 percent of 3,000 area residents questioned say they have less free time than a year ago. And a Hilton Time Values Survey of 1,010 adults shows Americans are losing their race against the clock -- by an average of seven hours a week.The Hilton study found that the average American has 19 hours of free time each week to spend on leisure activities, but wants 26 hours. The 27 percent shortfall is called "missed" time.
FEATURES
By John P. Robinson and John P. Robinson,Special to The Sun | May 22, 1994
If you're like many Americans, you feel pushed for time.A growing parade of best-selling books tells you how time is passing by, no matter how hard you try to get your life into overdrive: Juliet Schor's "Overworked American" says over the past two decades we've added a month a year to our work lives. Arlie Hochsield's "Second Shift" describes the working woman's plight: she still has a second, unpaid full-time job managing her home. "Busybodies" by Lee Burns says we are squeezing more activities into less time.
FEATURES
By Geoffrey Godbey and Geoffrey Godbey,Special to the Sun | June 26, 1994
When I'm driving and discover I'm lost, I have a tendency to drive faster and faster. This curious response could serve as an analogy for Americans' use and perceptions of time. American life goes faster and faster, perhaps because we're less and less sure where we're going.Time, for millions of Americans, has become the ultimate scarcity. A recent survey by Pennsylvania State University researchers found that 47 percent of Americans think they have less free time than they did five years ago, and more than one-third of the respondents in the national sample said they "always" feel rushed.
EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
Play is all but absent in our children's over-programmed lives, as Marco della Cava notes in his story, "Calendar Is Blank on May 22. " Free time needs to come back into our kids' lives, and it needs to happen now. There is a nationwide scarcity of play, and we are beginning to see a stark difference between children who play and children who don't. Kids who play are healthier. Kids who play are less likely to be obese and develop obesity-related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2012
So, I gather from the Twitterature that what I missed by skipping the Oscars last night was a crappy sound system and Angelina Jolie showing some leg. Still think your time was well spent on it? If your preoccupation with the Oscars over the weekend caused you to miss a little fun I had with the Frederick County commissioners over their ordinance making English the official language of the county, you can catch up here . Really, the wealth of asinine legislation in the United States beggars the resources of satire.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
Nicholas Benedict, a resident of Oak Crest retirement community in Parkville, earned a 60-year membership pin for his service with the Freemasons fraternal organization. The pin and certificate were presented to Benedict by Ed Foreman, master of Tuscan Masonic Lodge 202, in Towson, and Jack Grieve, grand inspector for the Grand Lodge. Benedict joined the Mount Vernon Masonic Lodge in New York in 1961, serving in numerous leadership roles. One of his main priorities was education, as the lodge consistently raised scholarship funds for local students.
SPORTS
November 6, 2010
Michael Thron of Olney asks: It has been a long time since I have hunted or even shot my 12-gauge shotgun (any free time outdoors lately has been devoted to piscatorial activities and endeavors). I would like to take it out sometime to shoot it, sight it in etc. What is the closest place to me or to someone in the Washington suburbs to do this legally and, hopefully, without a fee? Outdoors Girl responds: A list of ranges and clubs and contact information is on the Department of Natural Resources website on the Wildlife and Heritage page under the heading, "Quick Links.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010
Hilary Rosensteel, better known as Rosie the Rioter to fans of the Charm City Roller Girls, offers sage advice to those who think this might be the life for them. •"No. 1, you have to like to sweat. It is a sport. Roller derby definitely draws a lot of people for different reasons, a lot of creative types. But there's also people who have never played sports before. I think people leave sometimes because they don't like sweating. " •"You really have to like skating.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 17, 2010
If you wake up in the morning with the blues because people treat you mean, you could sing a song about it, or you could shop around for an enormous conspiracy that has denied you your constitutional right to liberty and happiness -- and how about Central Standard Time? What gives the feds the right to set your clock for you? It's tyranny. So you join the Free Time movement. You go to meetings. You tune in "The Bob Glenn Show" every day on Fox for your marching orders and set your clock as you darn well please and feel liberated from lockstep uniformity.
FEATURES
By Gary Cross and Gary Cross,Special to The Sun | July 31, 1994
"Time is my biggest problem right now. Before I went back to work, money was. So you have have time or money. Those are the two choices in life." Many of us identify with these words of a working mother.A growing industry of authorities in time and money management sells services to help us cope with hurry and unpaid bills. But these guides miss a deeper problem. Contemporary society fails to balance our needs for money and time.This wasn't supposed to happen. After all, thinkers have long predicted that mass production would meet all of our needs while freeing us from the unrelenting toil of our ancestors.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 17, 2010
If you wake up in the morning with the blues because people treat you mean, you could sing a song about it, or you could shop around for an enormous conspiracy that has denied you your constitutional right to liberty and happiness -- and how about Central Standard Time? What gives the feds the right to set your clock for you? It's tyranny. So you join the Free Time movement. You go to meetings. You tune in "The Bob Glenn Show" every day on Fox for your marching orders and set your clock as you darn well please and feel liberated from lockstep uniformity.
NEWS
By Rosa Brooks | May 19, 2008
Can you forgive her? In March, Lenore Skenazy, a New York City mother, gave her 9-year-old son, Izzy, a MetroCard, a subway map, a $20 bill and some quarters for pay phones. Then she let him make his own way home from Bloomingdale's department store - by subway and bus. Izzy survived unscathed. He wasn't abducted by a perverted stranger or pushed under an oncoming train by a homicidal maniac. He didn't even get lost. According to Ms. Skenazy, who wrote about it in a New York Sun column, he arrived home "ecstatic with independence."
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