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By Alice Kahn and Alice Kahn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1996
This Sunday, at gatherings from California to New York, friends and admirers of Mario Savio, the affecting and morally probing leader of the 1964 Free Speech Movement, will ponder just where he belongs in their personal and collective histories.But Savio's sudden death from heart troubles last month at age 53, more than 30 years after he was frozen in time as an icon of 1960s radicalism, has raised another intriguing question: What had he been doing all these years?It was a question that the intensely private Savio generally chose not to answer publicly as he taught school, raised three children and attempted again to involve himself in political issues, even while diligently fleeing the corruption of celebrity.
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By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
Alice Waters and Chez Panisse The Romantic, Impractical, Often Eccentric, Ultimately Brilliant Making of a Food Revolution By Thomas McNamee Penguin Press / 400 pages / $27.95 Irrepressible Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
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NEWS
By GENE MARINE | October 5, 1994
San Francisco. -- It's October 1, 1964: A graduate student in mathematics, then taking a year's leave, set up a table in University of California-Berkeley's Sproul Plaza, seeking support for the Congress of Racial Equality, a civil-rights group.As one more step in a continuing dispute between some student groups and the university administration, the young man was arrested for trespassing and placed in a police car.Which never went anywhere.In protest, the car was surrounded by people, mostly students.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
Clark Kerr, 92, the University of California president who oversaw a massive expansion in the 1960s and influenced higher education policy nationwide, died Monday in Berkeley, Calif. Dr. Kerr was fired in January 1967 by newly elected Gov. Ronald Reagan for being too soft on student protesters after nearly a decade heading the multicampus university -- a time when California was expanding its public higher-education system. He was part of a group charged by Gov. Edmund G. "Pat" Brown Sr. with devising a master plan to accommodate baby boomers headed for college.
NEWS
November 8, 1996
Mario Savio, 53, the Berkeley radical who became a symbol of the 1960s free speech movement from atop a police car, died Wednesday in Sebastopol, Calif., after suffering heart problems. He rose to fame as the voice of the free speech movement at the University of California at Berkeley in 1964.After many years out of the limelight, Mr. Savio had recently re-entered public life. He led a drive against higher fees at Sonoma State University, where he taught mathematics, logic and philosophy to remedial students, and opposed Proposition 209, the California ballot initiative approved Tuesday that aims to end state affirmative action programs.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
Clark Kerr, 92, the University of California president who oversaw a massive expansion in the 1960s and influenced higher education policy nationwide, died Monday in Berkeley, Calif. Dr. Kerr was fired in January 1967 by newly elected Gov. Ronald Reagan for being too soft on student protesters after nearly a decade heading the multicampus university -- a time when California was expanding its public higher-education system. He was part of a group charged by Gov. Edmund G. "Pat" Brown Sr. with devising a master plan to accommodate baby boomers headed for college.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 23, 1991
The trouble with the past is that it changes and re-changes as you move away from it, eventually becoming merely a collection of images seen through an accumulation of memory filters.Thus, the decade of the '60s is remembered for hippies and Black Panthers, student protest and Free Love, anti-war marches and B-52s bombing the bejabbers out of Vietnam (eerily, just as they recently bombed Iraq).But where did it all start? "The Mecca for a generation" was the campus of the University of California at Berkeley, asserts "Berkeley in the Sixties," the latest edition of the PBS series "P.O.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
Alice Waters and Chez Panisse The Romantic, Impractical, Often Eccentric, Ultimately Brilliant Making of a Food Revolution By Thomas McNamee Penguin Press / 400 pages / $27.95 Irrepressible Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 17, 2014
I was phoned the other night in middle of dinner by an earnest young man named Spencer, who said he was doing a survey. Rather than hang up, I agreed to answer his questions. He asked me if I knew a soda tax would be on the ballot in Berkeley, Calif. in November. When I said yes, he then asked whether I trusted the Berkeley city government to spend the revenues wisely. At that moment I recognized a classic "push poll," which is part of a paid political campaign. So I asked Spencer a couple of questions of my own. Who was financing his survey?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 30, 1990
The festival of politics, mischief, partying hearty and sanctimony known as the Age of Aquarius gets a nice revisit in "Berkeley in the Sixties," an ambitious documentary finishing up a two-day run tonight at the Charles.It's hardly a tough-minded revisionist work, but, to its credit, neither is it one of those treacly magical mystery tours of a past that never existed except in its participants' self-delusions.The bias is solidly Old Left, with the emphasis on political action as true cause and concurrent aspects of the phenomenon -- the hippie counterculture, which was both of and yet not-of the left -- viewed as self-indulgent infantilism.
FEATURES
By Alice Kahn and Alice Kahn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1996
This Sunday, at gatherings from California to New York, friends and admirers of Mario Savio, the affecting and morally probing leader of the 1964 Free Speech Movement, will ponder just where he belongs in their personal and collective histories.But Savio's sudden death from heart troubles last month at age 53, more than 30 years after he was frozen in time as an icon of 1960s radicalism, has raised another intriguing question: What had he been doing all these years?It was a question that the intensely private Savio generally chose not to answer publicly as he taught school, raised three children and attempted again to involve himself in political issues, even while diligently fleeing the corruption of celebrity.
NEWS
November 8, 1996
Mario Savio, 53, the Berkeley radical who became a symbol of the 1960s free speech movement from atop a police car, died Wednesday in Sebastopol, Calif., after suffering heart problems. He rose to fame as the voice of the free speech movement at the University of California at Berkeley in 1964.After many years out of the limelight, Mr. Savio had recently re-entered public life. He led a drive against higher fees at Sonoma State University, where he taught mathematics, logic and philosophy to remedial students, and opposed Proposition 209, the California ballot initiative approved Tuesday that aims to end state affirmative action programs.
NEWS
By GENE MARINE | October 5, 1994
San Francisco. -- It's October 1, 1964: A graduate student in mathematics, then taking a year's leave, set up a table in University of California-Berkeley's Sproul Plaza, seeking support for the Congress of Racial Equality, a civil-rights group.As one more step in a continuing dispute between some student groups and the university administration, the young man was arrested for trespassing and placed in a police car.Which never went anywhere.In protest, the car was surrounded by people, mostly students.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 23, 1991
The trouble with the past is that it changes and re-changes as you move away from it, eventually becoming merely a collection of images seen through an accumulation of memory filters.Thus, the decade of the '60s is remembered for hippies and Black Panthers, student protest and Free Love, anti-war marches and B-52s bombing the bejabbers out of Vietnam (eerily, just as they recently bombed Iraq).But where did it all start? "The Mecca for a generation" was the campus of the University of California at Berkeley, asserts "Berkeley in the Sixties," the latest edition of the PBS series "P.O.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | August 13, 1991
Revolution takes many forms. Chanting demonstrators were marching in protest in Berkeley, Calif., against volleyball courts about to be built by the University of California in People's Park, a haven for the free speech movement in the 1960s and for the homeless today. These protesters, sporting the long hair and tie-dyed garb of the '60s, are still fighting to change the system.Just a few blocks away, some revolutionary changes in medical technology and investment strategy are being tracked by the considerably more sedate Piedmont Venture Group.
NEWS
By Sandy Close and Nick Montfort | March 13, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO - Thirty years ago a student protest at the University of California over free speech sparked a worldwide chain reaction of youthful rebellion against authority. Is a new generation of free-speech agitators emerging now in cyberspace?Ever since the Telecommunications Act was signed into law, many denizens of cyberspace have taken to the Internet to protest its censorship provisions. But whereas the free-speech militants of the '60s staged campus rallies, classroom boycotts and street demonstrations aimed at bringing life at universities to a halt, today's protesters have largely eschewed public action (apart from a rally at San Francisco's South Park in December)
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