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NEWS
December 26, 2012
The politicians want to take away our guns again ("Battle lines form in gun debate," Dec. 19). But they don't realize why we were given the right to bear arms from the get go. It all goes back to that time in 1776 when we revolted against tyranny by the king of a foreign land. Sure, we have guns to hunt with, to protect ourselves, our families and our property, and also for leisure. But that's not why the Constitution grants us this right. The right to bear arms and form militia is for one main reason: That if and when the politicians decide to trample and burn the Constitution and form their own dictatorship, we have the right to take back our government by force.
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NEWS
December 26, 2012
The politicians want to take away our guns again ("Battle lines form in gun debate," Dec. 19). But they don't realize why we were given the right to bear arms from the get go. It all goes back to that time in 1776 when we revolted against tyranny by the king of a foreign land. Sure, we have guns to hunt with, to protect ourselves, our families and our property, and also for leisure. But that's not why the Constitution grants us this right. The right to bear arms and form militia is for one main reason: That if and when the politicians decide to trample and burn the Constitution and form their own dictatorship, we have the right to take back our government by force.
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NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - In the wake of the attempted bombing last week of the American Airlines flight from Paris by a terrorist nut with explosives in his shoe, I'm thinking of starting my own airline, which would be called: Naked Air. Its motto would be: "Everybody flies naked and nobody worries." Or "Naked Air - where the only thing you wear is a seat belt." Think about it. If everybody flew naked, not only would you never have to worry about the passenger next to you carrying box cutters or exploding shoes, but no religious fundamentalists of any stripe would ever be caught dead flying nude, or in the presence of nude women, and that alone would keep many potential hijackers out of the skies.
NEWS
March 21, 2012
It is not often that I find myself in agreement with former governor turned columnist Robert Ehrlich, or in sympathy with the four Republican contenders in this year's GOP presidential primary. However, I must support Governor Ehrlich's comment about cutting the candidates some slack on the stump ("Give pols a pass for verbal miscues," March 18). The risks of making embarrassing verbal mistakes while campaigning in a free society with a free press put exceptional pressure on those in the limelight.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
I was appalled after reading your editorial "Get out the vote" (Sept. 15). While you are welcome to blame low voter turnout on anything you wish, when you refer to Baltimore's general election as pointless, a line has been crossed. I shouldn't need to remind you that people have been fighting and dying in this country for more than 200 years for the right to hold free elections in a free society. To say make such a statement is shameful. You owe all veterans an apology. Gary Smith
NEWS
March 21, 2012
It is not often that I find myself in agreement with former governor turned columnist Robert Ehrlich, or in sympathy with the four Republican contenders in this year's GOP presidential primary. However, I must support Governor Ehrlich's comment about cutting the candidates some slack on the stump ("Give pols a pass for verbal miscues," March 18). The risks of making embarrassing verbal mistakes while campaigning in a free society with a free press put exceptional pressure on those in the limelight.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad that were published in a Danish newspaper sparked strong protests and boycotts in Muslim countries this week, and in response, newspapers across Europe have reprinted the cartoons as an affirmation of freedom of the press - and that has led to a storm of outrage spreading from Indonesia to North Africa and including threats of violence against Europeans in Gaza. Just what the world needs: a holy war over religious slights. The editorial judgment of those who published the cartoons in the Jyllands-Posten may be questionable, but freedom of the press is not reserved for unquestionable editors.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 22, 2002
BEIJING - Taking advantage of a rare opportunity to speak directly to this nation of 1.3 billion people, President Bush tried to convince ordinary Chinese today that the United States wants their country to flourish and that America is a kind, big-hearted nation, not a callous, international bully as it is sometimes perceived here. Speaking live on Chinese Central TV, the state-run national network, Bush also tried to gently address China's poor human rights record and authoritarian system, saying that political and religious freedom does not weaken societies but strengthens them.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 4, 1991
The outcome of Sunday's election in Albania, where the rural majority gave the Communist Party victory in a multiparty election, was one more bizarre episode in a bizarre year of mass demonstrations and mass flights from that country.It demonstrates again a fundamental problem throughout the Eastern bloc. The region grievously lacks a civic culture, with popular understanding of how people cooperate as well as compete to make a free society work.Parliamentary traditions exist, notably in Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary, but the generations which have matured during the past 45 years lacked any direct acquaintance with how a free society worked until the liberating events leading up to 1989.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 21, 1994
Washington. -- Government, like other situation comedies, is in summer reruns.On April 30, 1970, President Nixon, addressing the nation about the U.S. ''incursion'' into Cambodia, warned that the United States dare not be perceived as ''a pitiful, helpless giant.''Recently, as Congress writhed in its crime bill agonies, Speaker Tom Foley exclaimed, ''Let us not be a helpless giant!''The federal government is an increasingly helpless giant. This is a good thing, given that the alternative is for the giant to get its way, which would not be good for a free society.
NEWS
September 18, 2011
I was appalled after reading your editorial "Get out the vote" (Sept. 15). While you are welcome to blame low voter turnout on anything you wish, when you refer to Baltimore's general election as pointless, a line has been crossed. I shouldn't need to remind you that people have been fighting and dying in this country for more than 200 years for the right to hold free elections in a free society. To say make such a statement is shameful. You owe all veterans an apology. Gary Smith
NEWS
March 22, 2010
It was 10:45 p.m. Sunday night when I went outside to take note of the surroundings. I was full of mixed emotions; boiling over with anger soon turned to overwhelming sadness and disbelief that I was will be living the remainder of my life in economic slavery. I had thoughts of my parents in their late 60s not having enough of value to contribute in the coming years and being turned away for health care. My father, a Vietnam Veteran with two tours and 23 years of service, having his benefits slashed after he put his life on the line for our country.
NEWS
By Thomas A. Firey | December 6, 2006
Early next year, the Baltimore City Council and the Maryland General Assembly will likely vote on legislation to ban smoking in all bars and restaurants. If passed, these laws would end the nuisance and clothes-fouling stench of tobacco smoke in public places and reduce the health risks of secondhand smoke. And yet, the city and state would be wrong to pass them. Proponents justify a ban by arguing that secondhand smoke is a health risk. But all sorts of human activities are risky - from contact sports to rock climbing, from skiing to swimming, from riding a bike to having sex. Yet many people swim, bike and play football because they take pleasure in doing so, and that's their choice.
NEWS
By GORDON LIVINGSTON | August 16, 2006
"What is truth?" asked Pontius Pilate at one of the more consequential moments in human history. It is a question that persists in our own time, which might reasonably be called "the age of the lie." If every major institution is a crystallization of the dominant values of a society, what are we to think about the latest news from the world of sports? Floyd Landis' recent win in the Tour de France has been overturned by a drug test. Justin Gatlin, reigning Olympic champion in the 100 meters, faces a possible lifetime ban from the sport after testing positive for testosterone.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad that were published in a Danish newspaper sparked strong protests and boycotts in Muslim countries this week, and in response, newspapers across Europe have reprinted the cartoons as an affirmation of freedom of the press - and that has led to a storm of outrage spreading from Indonesia to North Africa and including threats of violence against Europeans in Gaza. Just what the world needs: a holy war over religious slights. The editorial judgment of those who published the cartoons in the Jyllands-Posten may be questionable, but freedom of the press is not reserved for unquestionable editors.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | May 8, 2003
WASHINGTON -- It isn't often you get to see a live political science experiment, but that is what we're about to witness in Iraq as the first interim Iraqi government is formed from the different factional leaders in the country. What American advisers and this Iraqi interim government will attempt to answer is the most fundamental question facing the Arab world and many developing countries: How do you get from here to there? How do you go from a brutal authoritarian regime to a decent, accountable, democratizing society, without ending up with an Iranian-style theocracy or chaos?
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | February 12, 1995
Washington. -- Two much diminished institutions -- the presidency and major league baseball -- saw their downward spirals intersect last week.The episode, which did neither of them any good, should illuminate the nation's thinking about the uses and abuses of government.President Clinton is asking Congress to empower him to impose binding arbitration on the players and owners. But even if Congress had spare time to invest in a matter of such marginal importance to most Americans and of negligible importance to the national interest, it should not do so.Rather, it should use the president's improvident invitation to intervene as an occasion for demonstrating a mature sense of proportion and limits.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
It was 10:45 p.m. Sunday night when I went outside to take note of the surroundings. I was full of mixed emotions; boiling over with anger soon turned to overwhelming sadness and disbelief that I was will be living the remainder of my life in economic slavery. I had thoughts of my parents in their late 60s not having enough of value to contribute in the coming years and being turned away for health care. My father, a Vietnam Veteran with two tours and 23 years of service, having his benefits slashed after he put his life on the line for our country.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 22, 2002
BEIJING - Taking advantage of a rare opportunity to speak directly to this nation of 1.3 billion people, President Bush tried to convince ordinary Chinese today that the United States wants their country to flourish and that America is a kind, big-hearted nation, not a callous, international bully as it is sometimes perceived here. Speaking live on Chinese Central TV, the state-run national network, Bush also tried to gently address China's poor human rights record and authoritarian system, saying that political and religious freedom does not weaken societies but strengthens them.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - In the wake of the attempted bombing last week of the American Airlines flight from Paris by a terrorist nut with explosives in his shoe, I'm thinking of starting my own airline, which would be called: Naked Air. Its motto would be: "Everybody flies naked and nobody worries." Or "Naked Air - where the only thing you wear is a seat belt." Think about it. If everybody flew naked, not only would you never have to worry about the passenger next to you carrying box cutters or exploding shoes, but no religious fundamentalists of any stripe would ever be caught dead flying nude, or in the presence of nude women, and that alone would keep many potential hijackers out of the skies.
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