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By JUDY FOREMAN | November 11, 2005
How long are you contagious when you have a cold? It depends on which virus is causing the cold, and there are lots - including rhinoviruses, adenoviruses and coronaviruses, to name a few, said Dr. Lindsey Baden, an infectious disease specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Typically, you are most likely to spread the virus to other people from a point just before symptoms appear through the first few days of an illness, when symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and production of nasal mucus are highest.
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HEALTH
By Karen Kolowski, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Karen Kolowski weighs in on pomegranates. The pomegranate has a long, rich history and has been considered a mystical fruit throughout the centuries. One of the earliest cultivated fruits, the pomegranate can be traced to 3,500 B.C. It is believed by some scholars to be what tempted Eve in the Garden of Eden rather than an apple.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | September 13, 1994
From a health and nutrition standpoint, the singular role of vitamins has been recognized for several generations. Through the pioneering work of Dr. E.V. McCollum of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, discoverer of vitamins A and D, the relationship between nutritional deficiencies and clinical symptoms of disease was demonstrated. Largely as a result of his untiring efforts, profound positive changes occurred in the American diet.Recently, a particular group of vitamins called antioxidants has gained widespread attention.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | November 11, 2005
How long are you contagious when you have a cold? It depends on which virus is causing the cold, and there are lots - including rhinoviruses, adenoviruses and coronaviruses, to name a few, said Dr. Lindsey Baden, an infectious disease specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Typically, you are most likely to spread the virus to other people from a point just before symptoms appear through the first few days of an illness, when symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and production of nasal mucus are highest.
HEALTH
By Karen Kolowski, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth). This week, Karen Kolowski weighs in on pomegranates. The pomegranate has a long, rich history and has been considered a mystical fruit throughout the centuries. One of the earliest cultivated fruits, the pomegranate can be traced to 3,500 B.C. It is believed by some scholars to be what tempted Eve in the Garden of Eden rather than an apple.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 17, 1994
Until this week I had been losing a supper-table argument.I had been arguing against an extra course, a pill course, being added to the family meal. I was worried that in the name of good health, I would soon have to pop pills containing big doses of vitamins A and E, members of a class of chemicals known as antioxidants.I believe that all vitamins should appear the way God made them, namely, in the form of delicious food and drink. I was opposed to tossing down tablets.The key to good health, I argued, was at the dinner table, not at the medicine counter.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2003
In retrospect, it was clear from the moment Samantha Fargo was born six years ago that something was very wrong. At first, she was too weak to breast-feed. By five weeks, she could drink from a bottle, but had such bad reflux (in which food backs up in the esophagus from the stomach) that her parents, Justine and Bill Fargo of Medford, Mass., had to keep her semi-upright all the time. She didn't walk until she was a year and a half old. Worse yet, she never seemed to have much energy. This spring, she developed gastroparesis, in which her stomach and intestines stopped functioning, prompting a long hospitalization.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Two independent studies have provided the first strong evidence that people who eat diets rich in Vitamin E might reduce their risk of getting Alzheimer's, a crippling brain disease. The apparent benefits, reported today by researchers in Chicago and in the Dutch city of Rotterdam, were seen in people who consumed foods such as grains, nuts, milk, vegetable oils, egg yolks and poultry - natural sources of the antioxidant vitamin. "These were the first studies to show a direct link between dietary intake of Vitamin E and the development of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Martha Clare Morris, principal investigator at Rush-Presbyterian-St.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | July 25, 1991
They started as partners in a quest to solve the riddle of deadly diseases, and they became enemies in a contest over wiggly lines. In the pitch of battle, there were papers pulled at the last minute from scientific journals, anonymous tips, allegations of stolen data in the halls of the School of Pharmacy and ugly confrontations at annual scientific meetings.It might be absurd, except that now the reputations of two strong-willed scientists hang in the balance. Pitted against each other are a young researcher, Carmen M. Arroyo, and the head of her former lab at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Gerald M. Rosen, in a case that goes to the heart of science: honesty in published research.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
Baltimore's police commissioner and nearly 50 of his officers packed a city courtroom yesterday, successfully imploring a judge to reject the plea for freedom of a former Black Panther member convicted of killing a city patrolman nearly 33 years ago. Jack Ivory Johnson Jr., 53, who with two other Black Panther members ambushed and repeatedly shot Donald T. Sager as he sat in his patrol car on a West Baltimore street in 1970, argued yesterday that more...
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2003
In retrospect, it was clear from the moment Samantha Fargo was born six years ago that something was very wrong. At first, she was too weak to breast-feed. By five weeks, she could drink from a bottle, but had such bad reflux (in which food backs up in the esophagus from the stomach) that her parents, Justine and Bill Fargo of Medford, Mass., had to keep her semi-upright all the time. She didn't walk until she was a year and a half old. Worse yet, she never seemed to have much energy. This spring, she developed gastroparesis, in which her stomach and intestines stopped functioning, prompting a long hospitalization.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
Baltimore's police commissioner and nearly 50 of his officers packed a city courtroom yesterday, successfully imploring a judge to reject the plea for freedom of a former Black Panther member convicted of killing a city patrolman nearly 33 years ago. Jack Ivory Johnson Jr., 53, who with two other Black Panther members ambushed and repeatedly shot Donald T. Sager as he sat in his patrol car on a West Baltimore street in 1970, argued yesterday that more...
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2002
Two independent studies have provided the first strong evidence that people who eat diets rich in Vitamin E might reduce their risk of getting Alzheimer's, a crippling brain disease. The apparent benefits, reported today by researchers in Chicago and in the Dutch city of Rotterdam, were seen in people who consumed foods such as grains, nuts, milk, vegetable oils, egg yolks and poultry - natural sources of the antioxidant vitamin. "These were the first studies to show a direct link between dietary intake of Vitamin E and the development of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Martha Clare Morris, principal investigator at Rush-Presbyterian-St.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | September 13, 1994
From a health and nutrition standpoint, the singular role of vitamins has been recognized for several generations. Through the pioneering work of Dr. E.V. McCollum of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, discoverer of vitamins A and D, the relationship between nutritional deficiencies and clinical symptoms of disease was demonstrated. Largely as a result of his untiring efforts, profound positive changes occurred in the American diet.Recently, a particular group of vitamins called antioxidants has gained widespread attention.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 17, 1994
Until this week I had been losing a supper-table argument.I had been arguing against an extra course, a pill course, being added to the family meal. I was worried that in the name of good health, I would soon have to pop pills containing big doses of vitamins A and E, members of a class of chemicals known as antioxidants.I believe that all vitamins should appear the way God made them, namely, in the form of delicious food and drink. I was opposed to tossing down tablets.The key to good health, I argued, was at the dinner table, not at the medicine counter.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | July 25, 1991
They started as partners in a quest to solve the riddle of deadly diseases, and they became enemies in a contest over wiggly lines. In the pitch of battle, there were papers pulled at the last minute from scientific journals, anonymous tips, allegations of stolen data in the halls of the School of Pharmacy and ugly confrontations at annual scientific meetings.It might be absurd, except that now the reputations of two strong-willed scientists hang in the balance. Pitted against each other are a young researcher, Carmen M. Arroyo, and the head of her former lab at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Gerald M. Rosen, in a case that goes to the heart of science: honesty in published research.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | April 9, 1992
Vitamin C greatly enhances the ability of vitamin E to prevent damage to LDL, the so-called bad cholesterol, which, if damaged, is suspected of being the first step in the progression to heart disease, according to researchers at the University of California at Berkeley.In the past few years, scientists have found that oxygen-free radicals, toxic byproducts of normal chemistry, can damage LDL. The damaged LDL then becomes embedded into arterial walls, leading to a buildup of fatty deposits.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | February 4, 1992
Increasingly, antioxidants have been in the press. They're beginning to make me question my belief that you can get all the vitamins you need from food.About 10 years worth of research indicates that "free radicals" may be responsible for some of the diseases of aging, and that antioxidants may inhibit their effects.Free radicals are reactive molecules produced in the body in response to ultraviolet light and pollutants such as cigarette smoke, auto exhaust and ozone which interfere with our ability to repair damaged cells.
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