Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFree Press
IN THE NEWS

Free Press

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 28, 2006
Seems there's some confusion about the role of a free press in a democratic society. President Bush lauds the concept as an American tradition he hopes new governments such as those in Iraq and Afghanistan will emulate. But as he and his supporters watch a free press function as intended here at home, they don't like what they see - and charge that the press is out of line. Most offensive to them, and this may apply particularly to Vice President Dick Cheney, is that the press is, well, free.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2014
The Pulitzer Prizes to two news outlets that cooperated with whistleblower Edward Snowden in the disclosure of widespread National Security Agency surveillance of electronic communications at home and abroad has U.S. officialdom in a dither. With the exiled Mr. Snowden harbored in Russia and widely branded at home as a traitor for leaking the voluminous evidence to reporters working for The Washington Post and the U.S. arm of Britain's Guardian newspaper, the Pulitzer committee came down squarely on the side of freedom of the press.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bahia Amrani | August 28, 2006
CASABLANCA, Morocco -- More than 500 years before Alexis de Tocqueville memorialized his impressions of American society in his celebrated Democracy in America, a Berber traveler from Morocco set off from Tangier on a pilgrimage to Mecca that would last 30 years. Thereafter known as the "Traveler of Islam," Ibn Battuta authored a travel chronicle that would have a profound effect on Islam for centuries. Unlike Democracy in America, which was concerned with demystifying American life for a French audience, Mr. Battuta orchestrated his own cultural exchange program, taking tidbits from the lands he visited during his trek and sharing them with his rapturous Islamic audience.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
Now comes the Baltimore Sun editorial staff that just recently blasted the Second Amendment rights to gun ownership ("Ban assault weapons," March 22) raising the roof that the press' First Amendment Rights have been trumped on because of the gathering of AP phone records by the Obama administration's attorney general ("An assault on press freedom," May 15). Either the Sun editorial staff thinks their readers are too stupid to know the hypocrisy of their positions on these two issues, or they actually believe supporting the Constitution is a menu of pick and choose.
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 10, 2005
Mitch Albom, one of Detroit's most prominent figures, is a one-man multimedia entity as a nationally known sports columnist, radio and TV personality, best-selling author and playwright. He added another role last week, one no journalist wants. Albom is making news rather than reporting it, under suspension from the Detroit Free Press until the paper completes an investigation of a fabrication in a column by Albom that ran last Sunday. Reaction in the journalism community, from columnist peers to college instructors, ranged from harsh to empathetic.
NEWS
April 6, 2002
IN RUSSIA, yet again, a news organization that just happens to offer a courageous alternative to the Kremlin's line just happens to fall into severe financial difficulties. The first to go, last year, was the NTV television station, which offered news reports that were by no means impartial or balanced but were pointed and sometimes devastating. When its debts were called in by the state-controlled Gazprom company, the NTV crew decamped to TV-6. But soon - wouldn't you know it - the giant Lukoil company was using its shareholdings in that station to shut it down.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | March 28, 2007
DETROIT -- When Ford Motor Co. handed out bonuses for 2006 this month, the checks that high-level managers got were a lot more than the $300 to $800 most workers throughout the company received. About 6,000 high-level managers at Ford operations around the world were eligible to receive bonuses that ranged from several thousand dollars to $15,000 or more, employees with knowledge of the bonuses told the Detroit Free Press. This month, Ford said it would pay what it called "modest bonuses" to all of its hourly and salaried workers below the rank of manager despite having posted a record $12.7 billion loss last year and having missed important market share goals.
NEWS
June 25, 2006
Mark Twain: A Life Ron Powers Free Press / 736 pages / $16 Powers' majestic biography of America's beloved 19th-century literary giant puts flesh on a figure who was in danger of deification, a fate Twain hoped to avert. Powers succeeds, our reviewer, Michael Shelden, wrote last year, restoring "the faded splendor of an epic life."
NEWS
August 18, 1996
Joe Seneca, an actor known for his work in movies about slavery, black leaders and human dignity, died Thursday in New York from an asthma attack. He never revealed his age, but his agent estimated he was in his late 70s.Mr. Seneca's last movie was "A Time to Kill," the courtroom thriller based on John Grisham's novel. His first big film was "The Verdict," in which he played a medical expert. He also appeared in "Silverado," "Crossroads" and "Mississippi Masala."Camilla Horn, 93, femme fatale in the heyday of the German screen, died Wednesday in Gilching, Germany.
TOPIC
By Paul Moore | April 17, 2005
THESE ARE demanding days for John X. Miller of the Detroit Free Press. Miller is the newspaper's public editor and has been hearing from hundreds of readers about a case of fabrication by Mitch Albom, the highly regarded Free Press sports columnist. Albom is nationally known for his columns, radio and TV work and also is the best-selling author of Tuesdays With Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven. Albom is the franchise player at The Detroit Free Press. It appears that he has become such a celebrity that his work has become virtually untouchable.
NEWS
March 21, 2012
It is not often that I find myself in agreement with former governor turned columnist Robert Ehrlich, or in sympathy with the four Republican contenders in this year's GOP presidential primary. However, I must support Governor Ehrlich's comment about cutting the candidates some slack on the stump ("Give pols a pass for verbal miscues," March 18). The risks of making embarrassing verbal mistakes while campaigning in a free society with a free press put exceptional pressure on those in the limelight.
NEWS
February 4, 2011
In its editorial "Police and fire fighters' misguided protest" (Feb. 2), The Sun calls on police and fire fighters to refrain from picketing the June 2011 U.S. Conference of Mayors convention because it could hurt city business. The irony of that suggestion is impossible to overlook. The Baltimore Sun, once a grand institution of the free press in America, is urging the city's police and fire fighters to refrain from exercising their rights under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS | March 23, 2009
On the day the last newspaper is published, I expect no sympathy card from Kwame Kilpatrick. Were it not for a newspaper - The Detroit Free Press - his use of public funds to cover up his affair with one of his aides would be unrevealed, and he might still be mayor of Detroit. Nor will I expect flowers from Larry Craig. Were it not for a newspaper - The Idaho Statesman - we would not know of his propensity for taking a "wide stance" in airport men's rooms and he might still be serving in the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen @baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Ask the man who owns one," which became one of the automotive industry's most enduring slogans, was unveiled by the Packard Motor Car Co. in 1901. The story goes that a potential buyer called one day and asked for a sales brochure. When a secretary related the request, James Packard, who founded the company with his brother William in 1899, replied that such literature didn't exist and is reputed to have said: "Tell him to ask the man who owns one." Now, as the Big Three automakers patiently wait with upturned palms for White House intervention and a slice of the $700 billion Wall Street bailout fund to save their troubled industry, it's a moment to recall the halcyon days when automakers wooed buyers with snappy advertising slogans and jingles cooked up by Tin Pan Alley and Madison Avenue.
NEWS
June 8, 2008
Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years By David Talbot Free Press / 479 pages / $15 Published in paperback to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the Robert F. Kennedy assassination, the book focuses on the relationship between Bobby and John F. Kennedy. The book is based on interviews with more than 150 people as well as government documents, and tells, among other things, of JFK's efforts to prevent war with the Soviet Union and Bobby Kennedy's secret quest to solve his brother's murder.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | March 28, 2007
DETROIT -- When Ford Motor Co. handed out bonuses for 2006 this month, the checks that high-level managers got were a lot more than the $300 to $800 most workers throughout the company received. About 6,000 high-level managers at Ford operations around the world were eligible to receive bonuses that ranged from several thousand dollars to $15,000 or more, employees with knowledge of the bonuses told the Detroit Free Press. This month, Ford said it would pay what it called "modest bonuses" to all of its hourly and salaried workers below the rank of manager despite having posted a record $12.7 billion loss last year and having missed important market share goals.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 18, 2007
From the pecan cabinetry to the flagstone patio, no detail about the Roland Park charmer featured in The Examiner's real estate section goes unnoticed, but for this: The guy trying to sell the place, Examiner Publisher Michael Phelps. Phelps has been trying to unload his home at 620 W. University Parkway since Dec. 6, when it was listed for $606,000. It was back in December that Phelps, who'd been publisher of the Baltimore paper since its launch last April, was named chief executive officer of the Baltimore-Washington Examiner Group, meaning he would oversee the Examiner in both towns.
NEWS
By Bahia Amrani | August 28, 2006
CASABLANCA, Morocco -- More than 500 years before Alexis de Tocqueville memorialized his impressions of American society in his celebrated Democracy in America, a Berber traveler from Morocco set off from Tangier on a pilgrimage to Mecca that would last 30 years. Thereafter known as the "Traveler of Islam," Ibn Battuta authored a travel chronicle that would have a profound effect on Islam for centuries. Unlike Democracy in America, which was concerned with demystifying American life for a French audience, Mr. Battuta orchestrated his own cultural exchange program, taking tidbits from the lands he visited during his trek and sharing them with his rapturous Islamic audience.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.