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By Will Fesperman and Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
When school lets out for the summer, many children lose access to free and reduced-price meals. In the past two weeks, Baltimore County and City both ramped up their efforts to feed these children, who account for eighty-four percent of students in Baltimore City and 47.4 percent in the county. Baltimore City and County are expanding summer programs that feed low-income children, many of whom rely on free and reduced-price meals served at their schools. The county is expanding its program to serve free lunches at four public libraries for the first time.
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NEWS
By Will Fesperman and Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
When school lets out for the summer, many children lose access to free and reduced-price meals. In the past two weeks, Baltimore County and City both ramped up their efforts to feed these children, who account for eighty-four percent of students in Baltimore City and 47.4 percent in the county. Baltimore City and County are expanding summer programs that feed low-income children, many of whom rely on free and reduced-price meals served at their schools. The county is expanding its program to serve free lunches at four public libraries for the first time.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
It's 4 p.m. when the mobile meals van pulls up to a patch of pavement behind the library at Pennsylvania and North avenues. The cardboard boxes it brings - filled with chicken sandwiches, milk and snacks - may be the first food some children have eaten all day. Even now, nearly 40 years after the federal Summer Food Service Program was first offered in Baltimore, only about half of the 46,000 children who eat free and reduced-price meals during the...
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | June 26, 2014
When school let out for the summer, most of the children in Baltimore who qualify for free and reduced price meals - 84 percent - lost access to the three meals a day they count on during the school year. Struggling families and children turn to community leaders who run summer supplemental programs, like Hattie Bailey, who serves meals at Full Gospel Fellowship Church through the federally-funded Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). But since SFSP only provides two meals per day, Ms. Bailey is unable to serve supper to the children in her program if she serves them breakfast and lunch.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Proposed new ethics rules would end the practice of keeping secret any unethical conduct by Annapolis city officials. Current law requires all violations to be kept confidential, city Ethics Commission Chairman Jim Dolezal said. The new laws call for the posting of summary explanations online. If passed by the City Council, it will be Annapolis' first major rewrite of ethics rules in 18 years. "Our goal is to really make the city government as open and ethical as we can," Dolezal said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
The Baltimore school system is raising the price of student lunches to $3 - one of the highest among the nation's large, urban districts - under a plan that also provides free meals to every low-income student. The price is up from $2.35 for elementary and middle school students and $2.65 for high school students. Some parents could end up spending $117 more this school year under the price increase, which is the fourth in seven years and the largest in that time. Others will save because their children will no longer have to pay the 40 cents charged for a reduced-price meal.
FEATURES
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
Marcus Clary beams when he shows off his new home by the Inner Harbor. The place isn't much, just an orange tent under a blue tarp that fits four, but it's the best digs by far he's had in three weeks. Before, he was at a homeless shelter. "At the shelter, you got one meal a day, and it was a small TV dinner and water. Here, the food is way better," the 21-year-old said. "I have lived at a lot worse places. We have mats here, sleeping bags over the mats, and blankets on top of that.
NEWS
August 3, 1995
Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland will sponsor a child and adult care food program at South Carroll Adult Day Care Center, 5745 Bartholow Road, Eldersburg.Eligibility for free or reduced priced meals from July 1, 1995, to June 30, 1996, is based on the following annual income scales:* Household size of one; to $9,711 for free meals; $9,712 to $13,820 for reduced meals.* Household size of two; to $13,039 for free meals; $13,040 to $18,556 for reduced meals.* Household size of three; to $16,367 for free meals; $16,368 to $23,292 for reduced meals.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
The Carroll County Board of Education has announced its policy for free and reduced price meals, and if applicable, free milk.The following household size income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. Based on the size of the family and annual income, students may qualify for either free meals or milk or reduced price meals.* One person: $8,606 for free meals; $12,247 for reduced.* Two people: $11,544 for free meals; $16,428 for reduced.* Three people: $14,482 for free meals; $20,609 for reduced.
NEWS
September 6, 1992
Carroll County Public Schools announced its policy for free and reduced price meals and , if applicable, free milk. The following household size income criteria is used to determineeligibility.Family .. .. .. Free meals .. .. .. Reduced-pricesize .. .. .. .. . or milk .. .. .. .. .. . meals1 .. .. .. .. .. . $8,853 .. .. .. .. .. $12,5992 .. .. .. .. .. . 11,947 .. .. .. .. .. . 17,0023 .. .. .. .. .. . 15,041 .. .. .. .. .. . 21,4054 .. .. .. .. .. . 18,135 .. .. .. .. .. . 25,8085 .. .. .. .. .. . 21,229 .. .. .. .. .. . 30,2116 .. .. .. .. .. . 24,323 .. .. .. .. .. . 34,6147 .. .. .. .. .. . 27,417 .. .. .. .. .. . 39,0178 .. .. .. .. .. . 30,511 .. .. .. .. .. . 43,420Note: For each additional family member add $3,094 fpr free meals or milk and $4,403 for reduced-price mealsSource: Carroll County Public Schools
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sometimes singers get pelted with tomatoes.  And sometimes they get free burgers. To celebrate Tax Day (if such a day can be celebrated), Hard Rock Cafe in Baltimore is offering free meals to people who stand up and sing in front of the rest of the restaurant's patrons, according to a news release from Maroon PR. Those who make it through a song can choose from new menu items such a fiesta burger, grilled vegetable sandwich or an arugula salad with chicken. Sounds more fun than sobbing over your tax return and opening a package of ramen.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
The Baltimore school system is raising the price of student lunches to $3 - one of the highest among the nation's large, urban districts - under a plan that also provides free meals to every low-income student. The price is up from $2.35 for elementary and middle school students and $2.65 for high school students. Some parents could end up spending $117 more this school year under the price increase, which is the fourth in seven years and the largest in that time. Others will save because their children will no longer have to pay the 40 cents charged for a reduced-price meal.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
It's 4 p.m. when the mobile meals van pulls up to a patch of pavement behind the library at Pennsylvania and North avenues. The cardboard boxes it brings - filled with chicken sandwiches, milk and snacks - may be the first food some children have eaten all day. Even now, nearly 40 years after the federal Summer Food Service Program was first offered in Baltimore, only about half of the 46,000 children who eat free and reduced-price meals during the...
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 8, 2013
  Baltimore City plans to serve 2 million free meals this summer to children who would otherwise have little to eat. Needy children often don't get enough to eat in the summer months when they are not in school to participate in the free lunch program. Under the city initiative, low-income children  under age 18 can get free breakfast, lunch and dinner at recreation centers, schools, churches, camps and other locations in the city. It is the second year of the porgram.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
For years, Jeff Mikula collected United Way donations from his fellow steelworkers at Sparrows Point. On Thursday, he - and 500 former co-workers from the now-closed plant - stood in line to receive them. The Dundalk man, who worked as an ironman for nearly 39 years at the mill, said accepting boxes stuffed by volunteers with chicken roasters and fixings for Christmas dinner was hard for the steelworkers, who were once among the charity's most generous donors in Maryland. "You see the need; you see what people are going through, the heartache," said Mikula, 57. "Steelworkers are proud people.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Proposed new ethics rules would end the practice of keeping secret any unethical conduct by Annapolis city officials. Current law requires all violations to be kept confidential, city Ethics Commission Chairman Jim Dolezal said. The new laws call for the posting of summary explanations online. If passed by the City Council, it will be Annapolis' first major rewrite of ethics rules in 18 years. "Our goal is to really make the city government as open and ethical as we can," Dolezal said.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sometimes singers get pelted with tomatoes.  And sometimes they get free burgers. To celebrate Tax Day (if such a day can be celebrated), Hard Rock Cafe in Baltimore is offering free meals to people who stand up and sing in front of the rest of the restaurant's patrons, according to a news release from Maroon PR. Those who make it through a song can choose from new menu items such a fiesta burger, grilled vegetable sandwich or an arugula salad with chicken. Sounds more fun than sobbing over your tax return and opening a package of ramen.
NEWS
By Alia Malik and Alia Malik,Sun reporter | August 6, 2007
Tomas Belizaire received free lunches last year as a second-grader at Mount Royal Elementary/Middle School. And now that it's summer, the free meals keep coming. A week into summer break, he started attending day camp at the Crispus Attucks Police Athletic League Center, where the food and activities are free. Tomas is one of 985 children who receive free meals every day through a "Healthy Meals, Happy Kids" program sponsored by the Maryland Food Bank and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Baltimore Moms on a Mission Squad.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Regarding your story about Baltimore City school administrators' credit card expenses, I propose that schools CEO Andrés Alonso be sent to the principal's office - in another state ("City school officials play loose with credit," Aug. 26). The reports of ongoing financial irregularities should outrage all taxpayers. Mr. Alonso has chosen to minimize the seriousness of the problem but he simply doesn't get it. He came to Baltimore with sterling credentials and a vision for improving a seriously distressed school system.
NEWS
June 24, 2012
Some Bel Air firefighters recently got in trouble for posting comments on Facebook that expressed disappointment that a local fast food restaurant had failed to extend them a discount routinely offered police and military personnel. The comments included a snide suggestion that the owner might feel differently if he found his dumpster set on fire or if the volunteers declined to respond to a fire on the premises. Eddie Hopkins, chief of the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company, took swift and appropriate action, giving reprimands to the nine firefighters involved, suspending several members and demoting an officer.
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