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NEWS
March 7, 2011
Paula Protani's letter ( "Medallion towing system benefits Baltimore, residents," March 4) is exactly what anyone should expect to hear from someone whose monopoly status is threatened. She claims that "the medallion towers provide the city with quality, reliable service, quick response and regulated prices. " The first question that should be asked of Ms. Protani is, "Compared to what?" By what standard do medallion towers provide quality, reliable service, and a quick response?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 9, 2014
Last week the Supreme Court struck down a key part of the Affordable Care Act, ruling that privately owned corporations don't have to offer their employees contraceptive coverage that conflicts with the corporate owners' religious beliefs. The owners of Hobby Lobby, the plaintiffs in the case, were always free to practice their religion. The court bestowed religious freedom on their corporation as well -- a leap of logic as absurd as giving corporations freedom of speech. Corporations aren't people.
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NEWS
June 30, 2010
In an interview on National Public Radio this week, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour said that the Gulf oil spill was an example of the free market working properly. He reasoned that BP had the most to lose from the spill, namely $100 million per day in costs. And thus, BP had the greatest incentive to clean-up the oil spill. His conclusion is odd: The market functions properly when an oil company has repeated safety violations, ultimately causing an oil rig explosion that causes a loss in lives and perhaps the greatest environmental catastrophe in history.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | June 2, 2014
In the past, Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome has been able to add some quality players in the second phase of free agency because of patience, and that won't change in 2014. In 2011, the Ravens added left offensive tackle Bryant McKinnie shortly before the season began and last year signed inside linebacker Daryl Smith on June 5. Smith went on to lead the team in tackles last season with 123. As of Monday, the Ravens were quite comfortable with their 90-player roster. "Basically, most of the players have been pored over and picked through," Newsome said.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 24, 2013
One of the most deceptive ideas continuously sounded by the right (and its fathomless think tanks and media outlets) is that the "free market" is natural and inevitable, existing outside and beyond government. So whatever inequality or insecurity it generates is beyond our control. And whatever ways we might seek to reduce inequality or insecurity - to make the economy work for us - are unwarranted constraints on the market's freedom and will inevitably go wrong. By this view, if some people aren't paid enough to live on, the market has determined they aren't worth enough.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
There would be little reason for the existence of a liquor lobby (or any other lobby for that matter) if it weren't for the countless unnecessary laws, rules and regulations emanating from the over-inflated egos of petty bureaucrats. Why can't we simply let every restaurant that wants a liquor license have one - for a reasonable fee - until it proves itself unworthy of the privilege? If only we let them, competition and the free market would weed out the bad apples. Dave Reich, Perry Hall
NEWS
January 26, 2011
In the topsy-turvy, Alice-in-Wonderland alternative universe of the tea party and its Republican toadies, small-government and free-market economic policy will save the nation from disaster. In fact, as thinking Americans know full well, the current economic crisis is largely due to the unmitigated greed of Wall Street banks and American homeowners, abetted for years by the "free market" nonsense that Reps. Paul Ryan and Michelle Bachmann continue to foist on the public. When the history of this era is written, it will be clear that the Obama administration's aggressive action saved the nation from a fate far worse than the current recession.
NEWS
February 4, 2011
If Republicans really think medical service is best rendered by the free market — hard to believe given that the United States' health outcomes rank on the bottom of the developed world — they should go all the way. Why do we have a fully government-run, taxpayer-paid, socialized, single-payer Medicare system if the free market does a better job providing quality care? Why, then, not let the market work its wonders for the elderly? Why, in the final analysis, do the Republican repeal gimmicks not include full repeal of the truly socialized medicine, Medicare?
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | October 22, 2008
Are we witnessing the end of capitalism? That's what you might think, based on the many voices now questioning the continued viability of the free market model that has provided our country with such abundance for well over two centuries. The strongest condemnations have concerned the unprecedented intrusiveness of the federal government's new role in the private sector and the ruinous dollar amount of the bailout package. These are legitimate concerns, but such criticisms must eventually give way to discussion about our path forward.
NEWS
By Christopher Lord | February 15, 2000
PRAGUE -- The accepted wisdom about the transformation of Eastern Europe over the past decade is that the former communist bloc is moving toward democracy and a market economy. These two terms are used together so often that you might get the idea they are an inseparable double act: Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy, Batman and Robin. But each of these concepts has its difficulties in the post-communist world. With democracy, it is relatively easy to diagnose these difficulties: Crooked politicians paid by crooked businessmen are the biggest problem in many countries, and in others the general failure of democratic politics is an even bigger one. But let's look at the other half of this pairing, and see how the market economy is progressing, and what the structural problems are in adapting.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 5, 2014
When people speak of a legacy, they usually mean something other than what the late economist Milton Friedman and his wife, Rose, left behind, namely the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice (edchoice.org). The foundation has just released a small book entitled " The ABC's of School Choice : The comprehensive guide to every private school choice program in America. " The Friedman philosophy can be summed up in two sentences, which are posted on their web page: "School choice gives parents the freedom to choose their children's education, while encouraging healthy competition among schools to better serve families' needs.
NEWS
March 2, 2014
In response to the editorial, "Climate change's day in court" (Feb. 26), it does seem that court cases on climate change result in very slow actions. After all, it has been almost seven years since the ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA stating that EPA has the right to regulate carbon dioxide emissions under the Clean Air Act, yet we have continued to have business as usual. Let's forget about the courts and instead use the free market to tackle carbon dioxide emissions by implementing a carbon fee. The fee can be placed on all products sold in this country and begin as low as $15 per ton of carbon dioxide emitted.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 5, 2014
Fair warning: This is about the "Duck Dynasty" controversy. Yes, I know. I'm sick of it, too. Still, relying upon my First Amendment right to freedom of speech, I will make a few observations about Phil Robertson, the grizzled Louisiana duck hunter turned reality TV star whose comments about black and gay people recently got him suspended -- and then unsuspended -- by A&E. If you find my observations disagreeable you may, relying upon your own...
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 5, 2013
I like capitalism. Specifically, I like the idea that if I write a better book, have a better idea, build a better mousetrap, I will be rewarded accordingly. A system where everyone gets the same reward regardless of quality or quantity of work is inconsistent with excellence and innovation, as the mediocrity and inefficiency that beset the Soviet Union readily proves. The woman who is successful under capitalism gets to eat steak and lobster whenever she wants. That's never bothered me. What does bother me is the notion that the unsuccessful man who lacks that woman's talent, resources, opportunities or luck should not get to eat at all. There is something obscene in the notion that a person can work full time for a multinational corporation and earn not enough to keep a roof over his head or food on his table.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
While the Orioles' trade of closer Jim Johnson late Monday night immediately offered more questions than answers about the club's direction this offseason, executive vice president Dan Duquette insisted Tuesday that the deal can't truly be evaluated for the next several weeks. The Orioles dealt Johnson, who saved 101 games over the past two seasons, to the Oakland Athletics just before the midnight tender deadline in exchange for infielder Jemile Weeks and a minor league player to be named later.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
When teams add players to their 40-man roster to protect them from the Rule 5 draft, the moves don't usually get a lot of fanfare. The moves don't always involve the organization's top prospects. Being protected means the player has been in the minor leagues for at least four or five years, so they're not the fast-track minor leaguers. Instead, they're usually players whose progress has been sidetracked by injuries or some other obstacle. That's what makes the three players who the Orioles added Wednesday -- left-hander Tim Berry, catcher Michael Ohlman and right-hander Eddie Gamboa -- interesting . Each of the three has his own tale of perseverance to get to this point, where the Orioles believe the player has shown enough promise that they don't want to risk seeing him succeed with another organization.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 26, 1994
POPOWO, Poland -- Tadeusz Durzynski has a bad case of vacation blues, even though he is one of the lucky ones not marooned at home.Mr. Durzynski is spending two weeks with his family at this woodsy resort in central Poland, just as he has every August for the past 15 years. The problem is that none of his friends is here, and the no-frills holiday is setting him back nearly two months' pay."This is capitalism," the bushy-eyed tractor mechanic moaned during a stroll through a cluster of deserted cabins.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 24, 2013
One of the most deceptive ideas continuously sounded by the right (and its fathomless think tanks and media outlets) is that the "free market" is natural and inevitable, existing outside and beyond government. So whatever inequality or insecurity it generates is beyond our control. And whatever ways we might seek to reduce inequality or insecurity - to make the economy work for us - are unwarranted constraints on the market's freedom and will inevitably go wrong. By this view, if some people aren't paid enough to live on, the market has determined they aren't worth enough.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 10, 2013
In 1975, when asked to explain why Margaret Thatcher was poised to take over the Tory Party, the irascible British satirist Malcolm Muggeridge replied that it was all due to television - and the fact that the telegenic Mrs. Thatcher had a "certain imbecile charm. " That was one of the nicer things said about an "imbecile" who earned a degree in chemistry from Oxford and became a lawyer while studying at home. (She sent her bar application from the maternity ward while recovering from delivering twins.)
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