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NEWS
September 30, 2001
Belief in our cause would defeat terrorists I guess we have to really get down in the gutter with the terrorists and play their game if we expect to stop them. The problem is, the fanatics are willing to die to make a point. I am not sure our western thinking will allow us to sink that low. Our country needs to pull together on this with other countries. I am not sure that is going to happen. Within our country I have not yet witnessed the fire in the belly to go after terrorists. In fact, I have not seen much of a cry for freedom.
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NEWS
April 6, 2009
Stress kills. It's a well-known fact, particularly given that cardiovascular disease is the nation's top killer. With the recession, the rise in unemployment, continued uncertainties in the Middle East and other global hot spots, and all the other anxiety-producing events unfolding around us, the last thing Baltimore needs is to get overwrought about Major League Baseball. Today, as Orioles Nation experiences yet another Opening Day, let us take comfort in the fact that we, as fans, need not trouble ourselves with stress-inducing thoughts of pennants or playoffs.
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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
Michael Austin is free from his prison cell, but he still prefers the dark solace of his cramped basement music studio to almost anywhere else. Who can blame him? The world outside bars and barbed wire has plenty of troubles of its own. Austin has walked the streets of his old neighborhood, where dealers have asked him to hustle drugs. The politicians are calling, eyeing him as a powerful campaign weapon against the city's top prosecutor. And then there is the anger he struggles to push away - anger about the life he was cheated of when he was locked up for 27 years for a murder he didn't commit.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 23, 2007
I WASN'T really into being followed around everywhere by six guys in six SUVs with two-way radios. ... I don't want to feed the fishies. I also didn't want to be one of those people who are sour about it. So I decided I'd just leave."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1995
Prince George's County will pay for life insurance policies for Gov. Parris N. Glendening and three of his top aides throughout the rest of their lives, county officials confirmed yesterday.Prince George's government finances life insurance policies for retired employees at a maximum benefit of about $127,000."They are retirees," county spokesman Royce D. Holloway said of the governor and his aides. "And we provide our retirees with life insurance."However, under the county's supplemental pension plan, Mr. Glendening and his three aides have also become eligible for tens of thousands of dollars in early pension benefits because each was either "involuntarily separated" or fired from his job.Government sources say the cost to the county of each insurance premium is less than $40 this year, miniscule compared with Prince George's $1.2 billion budget.
NEWS
By Marian Wright Edelman | July 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - In less than the time it takes to read this newspaper, another 14 infants will be born into poverty in America. Another 10 will be born without health insurance. And one more child in our country will be neglected or abused. We are blessed to be living in a time of incredible opportunity and unprecedented prosperity. We have a $10 trillion economy, eight years of record economic growth and a projected multi-trillion-dollar federal budget surplus. As we enter the 21st century, America's strength reflects our courage, compassion, hard work, moral values and commitment to justice.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart | August 16, 1991
It's one thing to be 32 years old and earning millions of dollars bTC for the privilege of getting bounced around as an NFL quarterback. But it's quite another to be a 32-year-old quarterback who gets bounced around for nothing.That's the position in which Ron Meehan finds himself as he prepares for another game for another team in another league in another city.Talk about the consummate semipro football player and you're talking about Ron Meehan. When he started at quarterback for the Baltimore Bears in their Mason-Dixon League opener two weeks ago, it marked the start of an 11th consecutive season of playing for "the love of the game."
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 23, 2007
I WASN'T really into being followed around everywhere by six guys in six SUVs with two-way radios. ... I don't want to feed the fishies. I also didn't want to be one of those people who are sour about it. So I decided I'd just leave."
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | October 15, 1995
If you think working as an independent contractor means you're free and self-reliant, don't kid yourself. Typically, this work arrangement makes you more of a slave than you'd be in a staff job. As a rule, you get no benefits, no paid time off for family or medical emergencies, and no protection against discrimination. Many of the workers accepting these gigs lately would be better off as full-time employees.Companies like independent contractors -- sometimes called consultants, free-lancers, contingency workers, or temps-- because they cost less than employees.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2001
The first use of the word "euphoric" I read after watching Baltimore video artist Lee Boot's mind-tickling "Making Euphoria" (screening tonight at the Creative Alliance) came in a book about a drug dealer who realized in 1973 he could fly dope out of Mexico and was "euphoric over the new possibilities." I mention this because Boot himself likes to use books as building blocks for his art projects (he once worked out his love-hate for the printed word by taping books together to make an easy chair)
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
On a quiet evening, less than a mile from where Howard County's lawmakers were busy approving a ban on smoking at all restaurants and bars, Kevin Basciano and John Scafidi sat in Ellicott City's Phoenix Emporium, puffing cigarettes and sipping bottles of beer. They both smoke but admit they don't like the smell it leaves on their clothing - or the feeling it gives to an establishment. "If I'm dressed nicely, I don't want to go somewhere and smell like smoke," said Scafidi, 30, of Philadelphia, as he took a puff of his cigarette and reached for an ashtray.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
Michael Austin is free from his prison cell, but he still prefers the dark solace of his cramped basement music studio to almost anywhere else. Who can blame him? The world outside bars and barbed wire has plenty of troubles of its own. Austin has walked the streets of his old neighborhood, where dealers have asked him to hustle drugs. The politicians are calling, eyeing him as a powerful campaign weapon against the city's top prosecutor. And then there is the anger he struggles to push away - anger about the life he was cheated of when he was locked up for 27 years for a murder he didn't commit.
NEWS
September 30, 2001
Belief in our cause would defeat terrorists I guess we have to really get down in the gutter with the terrorists and play their game if we expect to stop them. The problem is, the fanatics are willing to die to make a point. I am not sure our western thinking will allow us to sink that low. Our country needs to pull together on this with other countries. I am not sure that is going to happen. Within our country I have not yet witnessed the fire in the belly to go after terrorists. In fact, I have not seen much of a cry for freedom.
NEWS
By Marian Wright Edelman | July 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - In less than the time it takes to read this newspaper, another 14 infants will be born into poverty in America. Another 10 will be born without health insurance. And one more child in our country will be neglected or abused. We are blessed to be living in a time of incredible opportunity and unprecedented prosperity. We have a $10 trillion economy, eight years of record economic growth and a projected multi-trillion-dollar federal budget surplus. As we enter the 21st century, America's strength reflects our courage, compassion, hard work, moral values and commitment to justice.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2001
The first use of the word "euphoric" I read after watching Baltimore video artist Lee Boot's mind-tickling "Making Euphoria" (screening tonight at the Creative Alliance) came in a book about a drug dealer who realized in 1973 he could fly dope out of Mexico and was "euphoric over the new possibilities." I mention this because Boot himself likes to use books as building blocks for his art projects (he once worked out his love-hate for the printed word by taping books together to make an easy chair)
NEWS
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
They are called "graduates" - the few, the proud, the 27 men and women who have gotten off drugs and into jobs, reconciled with long-suffering relatives, and begun to repair their lives. But these first successes of a program called Recovery in Community know that you never entirely graduate from addiction. The chance of relapse is always there, especially in this patch of West Baltimore, where oblivion in the form of a bag of heroin or a vial of crack cocaine is always for sale. That is the thinking behind the program, which marked its first graduation last week with a standing-room-only celebration in a church basement.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
On a quiet evening, less than a mile from where Howard County's lawmakers were busy approving a ban on smoking at all restaurants and bars, Kevin Basciano and John Scafidi sat in Ellicott City's Phoenix Emporium, puffing cigarettes and sipping bottles of beer. They both smoke but admit they don't like the smell it leaves on their clothing - or the feeling it gives to an establishment. "If I'm dressed nicely, I don't want to go somewhere and smell like smoke," said Scafidi, 30, of Philadelphia, as he took a puff of his cigarette and reached for an ashtray.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
They are called "graduates" - the few, the proud, the 27 men and women who have gotten off drugs and into jobs, reconciled with long-suffering relatives, and begun to repair their lives. But these first successes of a program called Recovery in Community know that you never entirely graduate from addiction. The chance of relapse is always there, especially in this patch of West Baltimore, where oblivion in the form of a bag of heroin or a vial of crack cocaine is always for sale. That is the thinking behind the program, which marked its first graduation last week with a standing-room-only celebration in a church basement.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | October 15, 1995
If you think working as an independent contractor means you're free and self-reliant, don't kid yourself. Typically, this work arrangement makes you more of a slave than you'd be in a staff job. As a rule, you get no benefits, no paid time off for family or medical emergencies, and no protection against discrimination. Many of the workers accepting these gigs lately would be better off as full-time employees.Companies like independent contractors -- sometimes called consultants, free-lancers, contingency workers, or temps-- because they cost less than employees.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1995
Prince George's County will pay for life insurance policies for Gov. Parris N. Glendening and three of his top aides throughout the rest of their lives, county officials confirmed yesterday.Prince George's government finances life insurance policies for retired employees at a maximum benefit of about $127,000."They are retirees," county spokesman Royce D. Holloway said of the governor and his aides. "And we provide our retirees with life insurance."However, under the county's supplemental pension plan, Mr. Glendening and his three aides have also become eligible for tens of thousands of dollars in early pension benefits because each was either "involuntarily separated" or fired from his job.Government sources say the cost to the county of each insurance premium is less than $40 this year, miniscule compared with Prince George's $1.2 billion budget.
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