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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 23, 2007
MOSCOW -- Oleg Kassin objected to them all: the portrait of a robed Jesus Christ, his face replaced by a Mickey Mouse head, among his disciples; an icon of a halo-adorned Virgin Mary done in dots made to look like caviar; the photo of a crouched woman in a brassiere, thong and high-heeled boots with her rear to the camera. So he and the Russian Orthodox church group to which he belongs went to court this week, claiming not just questionable artistic taste, but an outright crime. For the second time in recent years, an exhibit at the Andrei Sakharov Museum and Public Center has become the object of a legal fight here and a touchstone for debate on the right to - and limits of - free expression in Russia, which, as it turns out, often comes at a cost.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | March 1, 2014
March has not yet brought spring, with the Mid-Atlantic cowering under a fresh White Doom From Above warning for tomorrow and Monday, but already the mangling of the name of the patron saint of Ireland is well advanced.  Every year on Twitter, @paddynotpatty undertakes the Sisyphean labor of demonstrating to multitudes apparently impaired by drink that the diminutive of the saint's name is Paddy , not Patty , having derived from...
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NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | November 4, 1992
Washington -- I stopped by a bookstore on K Street and bought a copy of ''Sex,'' by a woman named Madonna Louise Veronica Ciccone. Next morning I attended a board meeting of the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression.It was a nice juxtaposition. The Jefferson Center's mission is to protect every kind of free expression short of certifiable obscenity, and Madonna's book is about as free a form of expression as you can get. You can get it, you sucker, for $49.95. It comes in a plain aluminum wrapper.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
Change is dynamic, yet this "Anything Goes Generation" is far too scurrilous. Although each season has its time for every purpose, there are certain core values that should remain timeless - a sense of right and wrong, respect, courtesy, manners, humility, and altruism. Although too many Americans are adopting salacious, bawdy individual preferences, many Americans deplore immorality forced upon innocuous television viewers. Those born in decades before the 1970s had a different perspective.
NEWS
By JACK FRUCHTMAN Jr | March 27, 1991
[I]f there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought -- not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.Oliver Wendell Holmes, 1929Was Justice Holmes right? Must we always protect ''the thought that we hate'' to maintain our democratic tradition and our hallowed right of free expression which the Constitution's First Amendment guarantees?Recent instances of ugly expressions of race hate, gay bashing and denigration of women on college campuses suggest that the answer must be that these expressions cannot be tolerated.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 23, 2001
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- Josh Wheeler walks me to the busy traffic island that separates the local Merrill Lynch office from the nondescript City Hall. On one side of the island, money talks. On the other side politics is debated. Smack in the middle is the designated site for what will soon become something quite remarkable. A monument to the First Amendment, a public welcome mat to free expression. Mr. Wheeler, a tall, friendly bear of a man, walks up and down, measuring off the monument that will be as simple and ephemeral and controversial as free speech itself.
NEWS
October 26, 1993
Walt Disney Co., which has thrived on its ability to mine the magic within a child's imagination, should be commended for appreciating its impact on the darker side of formative minds as well.The moviemaker has announced it would take the virtually unprecedented action of pulling a scene from a movie it had already released because young men were aping it -- and killing or injuring themselves in the process. A scene in the film, "The Program," showed fictional college football players exhibiting their toughness by lying in the middle of the road as cars raced by. The scene also was struck from commercials for the movie on TV.Two Pennsylvania teen-agers were struck by a truck while mimicking the stunt; one of them died, the other was badly injured, as was a Long Island boy who attempted it with some 50 other kids looking on.Some people will rail against the post-release editing of this film as an abridgment of free expression.
NEWS
January 28, 2010
When one person's ability to make himself heard is may times superior to that of his neighbor, that first person can overpower the voice of the second and drown it out. When this is done, the second person's right to free expression has been denied because such drowned-out speech does not exist in any practical sense if nobody hears it. The Supreme Court, in ruling that there shall be no limits on corporate donations to political candidates, empowered...
NEWS
March 24, 2005
LET'S DISPENSE with some tangents right off. It's a bad idea for teachers to spank students. There's evidence that women are not innately handicapped when it comes to math and science. And it's offensive hyperbole to cast the World Trade Center victims of the 9/11 attacks as "little Eichmanns." But that aside, we don't have any problems with a student writing a school paper supporting corporal punishment, a university president raising the issue of possible gender differences, and a professor espousing radical ideas.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 5, 2011
Look, no one wants people dancing at national monuments. Folks doing the electric slide at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial would ruin the spirit of reverence and reflection it inspires. Still, it is hard to believe we need a federal law, a court ruling or squadrons of police in order to enforce that restriction. Sadly, we have all three. It seems that one night in April 2008, a woman named Mary Brooke Oberwetter and some friends went to the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington to celebrate the third president's 265th birthday with a silent, interpretative dance.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 5, 2011
Look, no one wants people dancing at national monuments. Folks doing the electric slide at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial would ruin the spirit of reverence and reflection it inspires. Still, it is hard to believe we need a federal law, a court ruling or squadrons of police in order to enforce that restriction. Sadly, we have all three. It seems that one night in April 2008, a woman named Mary Brooke Oberwetter and some friends went to the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington to celebrate the third president's 265th birthday with a silent, interpretative dance.
NEWS
March 13, 2010
More than 30 years ago, a young Jewish lawyer named David Goldberger defended the rights of American Nazis to march through the streets of Skokie, Ill., home to thousands of Holocaust survivors. Although he hated everything the Nazis stood for and knew that such a demonstration would cause great mental anguish to many of his fellow Jews, Mr. Goldberger -- then an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union -- felt that a larger principle was at stake. Under the U.S. Constitution, the Nazis had a right not only to hold their vile views but also to express them publicly.
NEWS
January 28, 2010
When one person's ability to make himself heard is may times superior to that of his neighbor, that first person can overpower the voice of the second and drown it out. When this is done, the second person's right to free expression has been denied because such drowned-out speech does not exist in any practical sense if nobody hears it. The Supreme Court, in ruling that there shall be no limits on corporate donations to political candidates, empowered...
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 21, 2007
CHICAGO -- The First Amendment, which guarantees freedom of speech and freedom of the press, takes the view that the people should dictate to the government, not the other way around. But no one told a group of 32 state attorneys general, who have taken it upon themselves to instruct the film industry on the appropriate content of movies. This time, the cause is not raunchy sex, foul language or blood-spattering violence. It's cigarettes. Many experts think that when actors puff away, they cause teenagers to do likewise.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | April 6, 2007
Now would seem a good time for all good Catholics to calm down. Some are making life difficult for those of us who insist that religious folks in this country are relatively sane and civilized about their beliefs and supportive of the principles, including free expression, that allow us to worship (or not) as we please. Especially problematic are those who reportedly have made death threats recently to express disapproval of an anatomically correct chocolate Jesus. Death threats? Isn't that what outraged Muslims do when cartoons hurt their feelings?
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 23, 2007
MOSCOW -- Oleg Kassin objected to them all: the portrait of a robed Jesus Christ, his face replaced by a Mickey Mouse head, among his disciples; an icon of a halo-adorned Virgin Mary done in dots made to look like caviar; the photo of a crouched woman in a brassiere, thong and high-heeled boots with her rear to the camera. So he and the Russian Orthodox church group to which he belongs went to court this week, claiming not just questionable artistic taste, but an outright crime. For the second time in recent years, an exhibit at the Andrei Sakharov Museum and Public Center has become the object of a legal fight here and a touchstone for debate on the right to - and limits of - free expression in Russia, which, as it turns out, often comes at a cost.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
Change is dynamic, yet this "Anything Goes Generation" is far too scurrilous. Although each season has its time for every purpose, there are certain core values that should remain timeless - a sense of right and wrong, respect, courtesy, manners, humility, and altruism. Although too many Americans are adopting salacious, bawdy individual preferences, many Americans deplore immorality forced upon innocuous television viewers. Those born in decades before the 1970s had a different perspective.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | February 23, 1997
If you have not read Salman Rushdie's "The Satanic Verses," you probably should. It is at least a near-great novel - great in my judgment. It is also today's most exemplary evidence of the cost and the burdens of free expression in a civilized society.It is, as all great work is, both playful and intense. A major element of its metaphor mocks -quite respectfully, almost fondly, to my eye and ear - some of the miraculous material of the Muslim faith. It is about as rude about Islam as, say, H.L. Mencken was on Presbyterianism - but not nearly so tough as Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" was on Massachusetts Puritanism.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | March 5, 2007
CHICAGO -- The First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of speech has complex implications, but it clearly means two things: The government cannot tell you what to say, and it cannot tell you what not to say. That is your own business, and if you conduct it in a way the government dislikes, the government can go climb a skinny pole. Unless by "government" you mean the Federal Communications Commission. It operates on the assumption that in its special realm, the First Amendment is a nonbinding resolution.
NEWS
December 5, 2005
Extending attack on free expression Our schools, where our youths are often just beginning to consider the world outside their friends and families, should encourage the free expression of ideas, even if these ideas seem controversial to teachers and administrators ("A conflict over the Pledge," Nov. 30). After all, I would prefer to see public schools graduating adults who are not afraid to think for themselves and stand up for their beliefs rather than automatons who simply do as they are told.
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