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NEWS
January 26, 2011
Your January 24th editorial, "College Bound, but undocumented," is based on misguided charity and flawed reasoning when it supports the in-state college tuition discount for illegal aliens. As you noted "Maryland spends, on average, a total of nearly $200,000 each to educate its students from kindergarten through 12. " What you failed to note was that Maryland's taxpaying citizens paid for the free education of illegal alien students because the federal government demanded it. There are an estimated 300,000 illegal aliens in Maryland, and if only 1,000 of these received a "free" education, it has already cost the taxpayers of Maryland $200 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2012
Alcohol abuse prevention grant The Department of Health's alcohol and drug abuse prevention and education services have been awarded a Maryland strategic prevention framework (MSPF) community implementation grant of $31,132 to the Anne Arundel Community College Foundation. The funding will be used for prevention strategies and programs specifically designed to reduce underage drinking in the community. Grant target areas are Brooklyn Park, Curtis Bay, Glen Burnie and Pasadena. Information: Sandy Smolnicky, prevention specialist, 410-222-6724.
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NEWS
By Liz Kay and Liz Kay,baltimoresun.com/consuming interests | November 27, 2009
What are Baltimore's best deals and discounts? The reporters behind Consuming Interests, The Sun's consumer blog, have come up with its list of the region's best bargains, which we share with you in honor of Black Friday. Some people will mark this day by seeking out doorbuster discounts, but we think there are some amazing experiences to be had that cost no money at all. We've also included some ideas for those who enjoy a little retail therapy. Home decor: Plagued by blank walls in your home?
NEWS
June 30, 2012
Many of us voted for President Obama as we believed he had the character, intelligence and the will to lead the country and to provide meaningful change. We voted for the man, but we also voted for the platform. A primary part of the platform was the passage of the Affordable Care Act, which will benefit all citizens. The Supreme Court has now ruled in favor of President Obama and all of the country. I have always been puzzled by the fierce opposition to this legislation. Why do some Americans begrudge other citizens access to the health care they need?
NEWS
June 30, 2012
Many of us voted for President Obama as we believed he had the character, intelligence and the will to lead the country and to provide meaningful change. We voted for the man, but we also voted for the platform. A primary part of the platform was the passage of the Affordable Care Act, which will benefit all citizens. The Supreme Court has now ruled in favor of President Obama and all of the country. I have always been puzzled by the fierce opposition to this legislation. Why do some Americans begrudge other citizens access to the health care they need?
NEWS
July 20, 2012
Alcohol abuse prevention grant The Department of Health's alcohol and drug abuse prevention and education services have been awarded a Maryland strategic prevention framework (MSPF) community implementation grant of $31,132 to the Anne Arundel Community College Foundation. The funding will be used for prevention strategies and programs specifically designed to reduce underage drinking in the community. Grant target areas are Brooklyn Park, Curtis Bay, Glen Burnie and Pasadena. Information: Sandy Smolnicky, prevention specialist, 410-222-6724.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
Consider it a digital call to arms.A battle without blood or bullets that can nevertheless leave casualties.A war whose soldiers can get a free education via the "TI Bill" (technology information).The University System of Maryland has proposed a "Year 2000 Fellowship Program" that would draft college students to help major companies lick the so-called Year 2000 crisis, a flaw that will have many computers reading the year 2000 as 1900 because their software was designed to record years by their last two digits only.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) and Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake are joining forces to offer low-income workers a chance at better jobs with a new program to provide free education online. In what its organizers are calling one of the first programs of its kind, Better Opportunities through Online Education seeks to break down the main barriers for entry-level workers, time and transportation. Designed primarily for women who have completed Goodwill's job-readiness course for welfare recipients and have gone on to permanent work, the program -- to be unveiled at a news conference in Annapolis this morning -- aims to take participants from jobs to careers by offering certificates in accounting, management, workplace communications and computer applications.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
The party for some 400 of Baltimore's gay and transgender community of color, held at a downtown hotel, included fishnet stockings and stilettos, music and dancing — as well as bowls of condoms and free HIV testing. Inside the Sheraton Inner Harbor hotel, workers from the city and local universities were stationed at tables, armed with pamphlets about dental services, food stamps and housing, plus free goodies such as water bottles. Before guests could enter the main hall, workers approached them, promoting the benefits of HIV testing.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Naval Academy midshipmen get a free education courtesy of American taxpayers in exchange for serving five years in the military after graduation. But when students leave the academy — voluntarily or not — they often have to repay Uncle Sam for the cost of their education. Two midshipmen are in the process of "disenrolling" from the academy as part of the fallout of a high-profile sexual assault case. But neither is likely to be hit with a tuition bill because the incident that led to their departure occurred before they agreed to serve in the military.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
The party for some 400 of Baltimore's gay and transgender community of color, held at a downtown hotel, included fishnet stockings and stilettos, music and dancing — as well as bowls of condoms and free HIV testing. Inside the Sheraton Inner Harbor hotel, workers from the city and local universities were stationed at tables, armed with pamphlets about dental services, food stamps and housing, plus free goodies such as water bottles. Before guests could enter the main hall, workers approached them, promoting the benefits of HIV testing.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Your January 24th editorial, "College Bound, but undocumented," is based on misguided charity and flawed reasoning when it supports the in-state college tuition discount for illegal aliens. As you noted "Maryland spends, on average, a total of nearly $200,000 each to educate its students from kindergarten through 12. " What you failed to note was that Maryland's taxpaying citizens paid for the free education of illegal alien students because the federal government demanded it. There are an estimated 300,000 illegal aliens in Maryland, and if only 1,000 of these received a "free" education, it has already cost the taxpayers of Maryland $200 million.
NEWS
By Liz Kay and Liz Kay,baltimoresun.com/consuming interests | November 27, 2009
What are Baltimore's best deals and discounts? The reporters behind Consuming Interests, The Sun's consumer blog, have come up with its list of the region's best bargains, which we share with you in honor of Black Friday. Some people will mark this day by seeking out doorbuster discounts, but we think there are some amazing experiences to be had that cost no money at all. We've also included some ideas for those who enjoy a little retail therapy. Home decor: Plagued by blank walls in your home?
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2000
The University of Maryland University College (UMUC) and Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake are joining forces to offer low-income workers a chance at better jobs with a new program to provide free education online. In what its organizers are calling one of the first programs of its kind, Better Opportunities through Online Education seeks to break down the main barriers for entry-level workers, time and transportation. Designed primarily for women who have completed Goodwill's job-readiness course for welfare recipients and have gone on to permanent work, the program -- to be unveiled at a news conference in Annapolis this morning -- aims to take participants from jobs to careers by offering certificates in accounting, management, workplace communications and computer applications.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
Consider it a digital call to arms.A battle without blood or bullets that can nevertheless leave casualties.A war whose soldiers can get a free education via the "TI Bill" (technology information).The University System of Maryland has proposed a "Year 2000 Fellowship Program" that would draft college students to help major companies lick the so-called Year 2000 crisis, a flaw that will have many computers reading the year 2000 as 1900 because their software was designed to record years by their last two digits only.
NEWS
August 31, 2011
I fully agree with letter writer Thomas Jandl ("Free trade does not kill jobs," Aug. 30) that fewer trade barriers mean more jobs. We are living in a worldwide economy and it is time that the people in the U.S. realize this as a great opportunity and not a threat. It is tough for Americans to switch from a consumer to a creator when you don't have an efficient education system and poorly educated professionals. Other countries offer free education including college and trade school.
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