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Frederick Douglass

SPORTS
November 26, 2011
Class 4A Old Mill 49, Catonsville 20 Quince Orchard 23, C.H. Flowers 12   Class 3A River Hill 41, Aberdeen 7 Thomas Johnson 12, Huntingtown 3   Class 2A Middletown 48, Edmondson 8 Frederick Douglass 22, Kent Island 6   Class 1A Dunbar 42, Overlea 6 Perryville 20, Fort Hill 14, OT   STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS (at M&T Bank Stadium)...
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NEWS
May 22, 2007
On May 20, 2007, FREDERICK DOUGLASS. On Wednesday, friends may call at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Services (East) 4905 York Road where the family will receive friends from 3-8 P.M. On Thursday, services will be held at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Chapel, 4905 York Road where the family will receive friends from 10 -10:30 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-433-7500.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
Sam Lacy, sports editor of the Baltimore Afro-American, yesterday received the Frederick Douglass Award from the University System of Maryland, amid observations that the lives of the two civil rights activists nearly overlapped.Lacy, 94, was born eight years after Douglass' death. Better he follow in Douglass' footsteps, Lacy said of the 19th century abolitionist and editor."Frederick Douglass laid the groundwork for my work in journalism," Lacy said at a luncheon in his honor at Oriole Park.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 23, 2002
THE BLACK woman emerged from stage left, attired in one of those 19th-century dresses that were narrow at the waist but billowed at the bottom. She wore a red hat with a black band and black gloves. Her voice - lovely, soulful and deep - soon filled the room, telling the audience how the ancestors of African-Americans came to these shores not voluntarily as immigrants seeking a better life, but in chains. The woman told the audience she was playing Anna Douglass, who was the first wife of Frederick Douglass - abolitionist, writer, editor, lecturer, ambassador, presidential adviser and, arguably, the most outstanding American of the 19th century.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 30, 1996
Roger Guenveur Smith knows that the Huey P. Newton most of us remember is a one-dimensional figure -- the angry revolutionary with a rifle in hand and a bandoleer across his chest.But to Smith, whose one-man show, "A Huey P. Newton Story," opens tomorrow at Center Stage, the late co-founder of the Black Panther Party is "a tragic hero of Shakespearean dimensions. In a sense, he's my Hamlet."Smith believes that Newton, like Hamlet, is a man of many contradictions: "In 1966 he founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense with Bobby Seale, and he did that on the streets of Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1996
When the Nation of Islam Security Agency lost its city contract last year to guard some of Baltimore's high-rise public housing projects, Kimberly Albright lost her paycheck.For a year, she had patrolled West Baltimore's Lexington Terrace apartments, a job with perils but a wage that fed her two children. That ended in November when a new guard assumed her post after a federal order gave the lucrative contract to a competitor.But that legal tangle has benefited a Baltimore high school looking for help.
NEWS
By ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS and ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2006
IN THE LIVING CLASSROOM Foundation on South Caroline Street, sixth-graders from the Crossroads charter school are sitting on the floor waiting for their surprise guests. Jamila Sams, the dean of students, asks the children whether they know about Frederick Douglass, a former slave and abolitionist who lived in Baltimore. None of them has an exact answer. Then suddenly, a long, low wail erupts from the back of the room and a woman stomps in wearing a 19th-century teal dress that looks like it has a giant birdcage underneath the skirt.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2001
There is no historical marker at the vacant lot near Caroline and Thames streets where Frederick Douglass walked into a store to buy his first book. There are no signs on the white concrete garage on Aliceanna Street or in the parking area across from H&S Bakery on Fleet Street, other Fells Point sites associated with the famous abolitionist. Ellen Frost passes them nearly every day but didn't realize until yesterday that each site was important in the life of Douglass, who spent nearly 10 years in Fells Point before he escaped from slavery in Baltimore and became one of the 19th century's most important human and civil rights activists.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
The opening ceremony for a new exhibit on Abraham Lincoln is set for 6 p.m. today at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The national traveling exhibition, Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation, looks at Lincoln's views on slavery and how they changed during the Civil War. The central library, at 400 Cathedral St., also plans a series of other free programs in connection with the six-week exhibit, including a living history presentation on...
NEWS
By Lester J. Davis and Lester J. Davis,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2004
The walls of City Hall's executive conference room have undergone a modern makeover that proved unfit for English nobility. Gone are the gigantic 8-foot-tall paintings of what Mayor Martin O'Malley calls the "old white guys in tights" -- the first and second 17th-century Lords of Baltimore. Last week, they were replaced with 14 smaller portrait-style hand drawings of area pioneers. In an effort to bring more diversity to a room where most of the mayor's news conferences take place, O'Malley decided that the two paintings failed to capture the essence of Baltimore.
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