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Frederick Douglass

NEWS
May 22, 2007
On May 20, 2007, FREDERICK DOUGLASS. On Wednesday, friends may call at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Services (East) 4905 York Road where the family will receive friends from 3-8 P.M. On Thursday, services will be held at Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Chapel, 4905 York Road where the family will receive friends from 10 -10:30 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-433-7500.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
Sam Lacy, sports editor of the Baltimore Afro-American, yesterday received the Frederick Douglass Award from the University System of Maryland, amid observations that the lives of the two civil rights activists nearly overlapped.Lacy, 94, was born eight years after Douglass' death. Better he follow in Douglass' footsteps, Lacy said of the 19th century abolitionist and editor."Frederick Douglass laid the groundwork for my work in journalism," Lacy said at a luncheon in his honor at Oriole Park.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | September 6, 2011
A new vision for our city in the 21st century is sorely lacking from the discourse in the Baltimore City mayor's race. Sure, lowering property taxes is a good idea, but it is not a game changer - even if it could be done without slashing city services. More than fiscal magic, our city yearns for a leader with a strategy for improving Baltimore's image and economic prospects. We all realize that Baltimore is not a place that people from other states or countries think of as a prime vacation destination.
NEWS
By IAN FINSETH | August 20, 2006
Long ago, in the small Chesapeake Bay town of St. Michaels, a slave named Frederick Douglass beat up a white farmer named Edward Covey who had been hired to "break" the difficult young man. That fistfight was a turning point in Mr. Douglass' life, liberating him from fear, and it set him on a path that would lead him out of slavery and into a career as the preeminent African-American spokesman of the 19th century and one of the truly remarkable figures of...
NEWS
By ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS and ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2006
IN THE LIVING CLASSROOM Foundation on South Caroline Street, sixth-graders from the Crossroads charter school are sitting on the floor waiting for their surprise guests. Jamila Sams, the dean of students, asks the children whether they know about Frederick Douglass, a former slave and abolitionist who lived in Baltimore. None of them has an exact answer. Then suddenly, a long, low wail erupts from the back of the room and a woman stomps in wearing a 19th-century teal dress that looks like it has a giant birdcage underneath the skirt.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 23, 2002
THE BLACK woman emerged from stage left, attired in one of those 19th-century dresses that were narrow at the waist but billowed at the bottom. She wore a red hat with a black band and black gloves. Her voice - lovely, soulful and deep - soon filled the room, telling the audience how the ancestors of African-Americans came to these shores not voluntarily as immigrants seeking a better life, but in chains. The woman told the audience she was playing Anna Douglass, who was the first wife of Frederick Douglass - abolitionist, writer, editor, lecturer, ambassador, presidential adviser and, arguably, the most outstanding American of the 19th century.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2001
There is no historical marker at the vacant lot near Caroline and Thames streets where Frederick Douglass walked into a store to buy his first book. There are no signs on the white concrete garage on Aliceanna Street or in the parking area across from H&S Bakery on Fleet Street, other Fells Point sites associated with the famous abolitionist. Ellen Frost passes them nearly every day but didn't realize until yesterday that each site was important in the life of Douglass, who spent nearly 10 years in Fells Point before he escaped from slavery in Baltimore and became one of the 19th century's most important human and civil rights activists.
NEWS
By GREGORY J. WALLANCE | January 8, 2006
Slavery haunts us. It lurks in the shadows of our conscience, emerging only for painful confrontations in a museum or occasional book. Otherwise, we exorcise it from our memories. Sometimes, we do both at once; witness what recently happened to two infamous slave houses in Maryland. One was the home of Josiah Henson, a slave whose story was the basis for Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. The book so ignited anti-slavery passion in the North that Abraham Lincoln greeted the author by saying, "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war."
NEWS
May 5, 2005
The opening ceremony for a new exhibit on Abraham Lincoln is set for 6 p.m. today at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The national traveling exhibition, Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation, looks at Lincoln's views on slavery and how they changed during the Civil War. The central library, at 400 Cathedral St., also plans a series of other free programs in connection with the six-week exhibit, including a living history presentation on...
NEWS
By Elizabeth A. Shack and Elizabeth A. Shack,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2002
Five houses in Fells Point, developed by Frederick Douglass in 1892, will undergo the first step toward becoming Baltimore landmarks tomorrow. The buildings at 516, 518, 520, 522 and 524 Dallas St. were placed on the National Register of Historic Places in the early 1980s. The local designation is long overdue, said Kathleen Kotarba, executive director of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation. The local designation protects the buildings from being destroyed, she said.
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