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NEWS
July 20, 2011
The Board of Commissioners for Frederick County has it all wrong in its effort to privatize services currently provided by public-sector employees ("Frederick County struggles over privatization proposal," July 16). I have spent many days on Frederick County baseball fields watching my grandchildren play. I am amazed at the condition of all the fields, which are second to none thanks to the hard work of the public- sector employees. Frederick is trying to make ends meet, but the privatization of these services will mean layoffs and consequently less tax revenue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Francis Scott Key is so closely identified with Fort McHenry that the South Baltimore landmark is considered the go-to place to learn how the 15-starred American flag that flew after the fort's bombardment 200 years ago inspired him to write the poem that became the national anthem. But those wishing to pay their final respects to the lawyer-turned-poet could also head 50 miles west to Frederick, where Key is buried in a sprawling cemetery that runs along U.S. 40 where it shares the roadway with busy Interstate 70. "Key always wanted to be buried in the shadow of the Catoctin Mountains," said Ron Pearcey, the superintendent of Mount Olivet Cemetery.
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NEWS
November 17, 2011
It seems pretty clear that the thugs in Frederick County want to apprehend illegal immigrants through their children attending Frederick County public schools. It is inescapable that the effects of this will be even more tragic estrangement of immigrant children from their parents. Even assuming the most humane deportation procedures it is clear that the parents of these children will be incarcerated for an extended period. This vigorous local enforcement of federal immigration laws will obviously result in circumspect parents being reluctant to send their children to school (which is already occurring in Alabama)
NEWS
August 5, 2014
A Crofton man was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison plus 20 years for the killing of a Frederick man who prosecutors said had been his partner in a drug operation. Michael Stahlnecker, 51, was sentenced in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court for the November 2012 killing of John Patrick Ryan. State's Attorney Anne Colt Leitess said in a release that Ryan had been under investigation by Frederick County officials on suspicion that he was involved in a marijuana operation in Maryland and California.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
The Frederick County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday night to adopt an ordinance making English the county's official language, the Frederick News-Post has reported. According to the newspaper, the board voted 4-1 to approve the law, which replaces a previous nonbinding resolution. The measure appears more symbolic than substantive, and does not override federal or state laws requiring the use of other languages in certain circumstances. Nor does it prevent county officials from using other languages in emergencies or to communicate with criminal suspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Metro Meteor, whose abstract paintings rapidly are becoming an art world sensation, might be just a horse. And the 11-year-old bay, like all equines, has a hard time distinguishing reds from greens or browns. Yet Metro's original watercolors have become the runaway favorite at a regional art gallery. He has racked up a combined $130,000 in sales for his paintings and, through a separate licensing agreement, a line of home-decorating products. "Metro is by far our best-selling artist," said Peggy Rock, the director of Gallery 30 in Gettysburg, Pa. There, the horse, who is stabled here in Frederick County, has sold 80 large paintings and 300 miniature works at prices ranging from $80 to $850.
NEWS
By Sun Staff | September 15, 2012
The U.S. Geological Survey Saturday reported an early-morning earthquake of 2.1 magnitude in parts of western Carroll County and eastern Frederick County. The USGS said the epicenter was about three miles from Linganore, in Frederick County, and about 11 miles from Westminster in Carroll. A spokesman at Linganore Winecellars in Mount Airy said the vineyard had no awareness of the quake. According to the Richter scale, a 2.0 magnitude earthquake is large enough to be detected but generally not felt.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
The Sun is critical of Frederick County's enforcement of immigration laws ( "Frederick's mistaken obsession with immigration enforcement," Aug. 9), but where is the criticism of our elected officials for the non-enforcement of our laws, including immigration? It seems that from the president on down, our officials only enforce the laws they agree with and not the ones with which they disagree. Or the ones that get in the way of their politics. President Barack Obama should not be allowed to exempt businesses from part of ObamaCare while putting the rest of us under its control, nor should cities and counties in Maryland have the authority to ignore immigration law and become sanctuary cities/counties for illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
Four men, including a Hagerstown father and his two sons, were arrested Saturday in connection with an August bar fight that caused the death of a 26 year-old from Rocky Ridge, state police said. Arrested were John D. Robey, 52, and his two sons Jonathan L. Robey, 20 and Thomas J. Robey, 22 — all recent residents of Hagerstown. Michael J. "Hank" Grimes, of Woodsboro, was also arrested. Police said all were charged with second degree murder, manslaughter and assault. All four are being held without bond at the Carroll County Detention Center, police said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2011
If Frederick increasingly is known for its trendy restaurants and shops, its historical roots remain a part of its fabric, from a City Hall built on the site of an early protest against British rule to a mall and minor league baseball team named after hometown hero Francis Scott Key. Now, another revolution could be fomenting as Frederick County considers a radical change to the way it does government business: It is debating whether to outsource many...
NEWS
July 15, 2014
We thank the nameless graffiti artist in Carroll County who spray painted a denunciation of an aborted plan to house some of the thousands of unaccompanied minors who have crossed the southern U.S. border in recent months at a military facility near Westminster. He or she has told us all we need to know about what's driving the furor over these children. No, we're not going to harp on the first part of the message — "No illeagles here" — and claim that stupidity is at the heart of things.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
At least six General Assembly incumbents were trailing opponents after early primary returns Tuesday evening — but many incumbents were turning back tough challenges. With early results reported from polls across the state, state Sen. James Brochin, the northern Baltimore County Democrat known for an independent streak, led former Del. Connie DeJuliis, a more progressive candidate backed by Gov. Martin O'Malley. "People like independence, and they like someone who will stand up to the establishment," said Brochin, who's voted against several of the governor's tax increases.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
More than 46,500 ballots were cast in the first three days of early voting in the Maryland gubernatorial primary, according to the State Board of Elections. The bulk of those came in the first two days, on Thursday and Friday, when 20,382 ballots and 17,115 ballots were cast, respectively, according to board data. There were 9,024 ballots cast Saturday. The total of 46,521 represents about 1.4 percent of eligible, active voters on precinct registries. Maryland started offering early voting in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Metro Meteor, whose abstract paintings rapidly are becoming an art world sensation, might be just a horse. And the 11-year-old bay, like all equines, has a hard time distinguishing reds from greens or browns. Yet Metro's original watercolors have become the runaway favorite at a regional art gallery. He has racked up a combined $130,000 in sales for his paintings and, through a separate licensing agreement, a line of home-decorating products. "Metro is by far our best-selling artist," said Peggy Rock, the director of Gallery 30 in Gettysburg, Pa. There, the horse, who is stabled here in Frederick County, has sold 80 large paintings and 300 miniature works at prices ranging from $80 to $850.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Frederick voters may notice a theme to their primary ballots next month: Young for state senator. Young for county executive. Young for county school board. Young for state delegate. Politics, after all, is the Young family business. "I was driving the other day, and I literally saw all four of their campaign signs on the same corner," said Todd Anderson, a federal contractor who lives in the city of Frederick. "I guess we've got kind of a Kennedy clan here. " The family's dominance in city and county politics is measured in decades.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
For the seniors on Marriotts Ridge's girls lacrosse team, putting their third state title in perspective wasn't all that easy. Wednesday's 18-5 Class 3A-2A title victory over Oakdale at UMBC sent the No. 4 Mustangs seniors off with the happy ending they wanted, but it was a split decision whether this championship was better than their first. "Freshman year was the best. Nothing can compare with that feeling," senior defender Alexis Zadjura said of the first girls lacrosse championship in school history.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 31, 2013
Unhappy over a state law requiring property owners to pay a new fee to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay, Frederick County officials have decided to set the charge at just a penny a year. The county's board of commissioners approved the 1-cent storm-water pollution control fee on Thursday, declaring they were doing even that only to avoid possible state restrictions on new development in the county if they didn't act. "We are being forced to charge this fee, so we decided to keep it at one cent just to meet the letter of the law," Blaine Young, president of the county commissioners, said in a press release announcing the action.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
When Jamie Krantz was invited to join a band made up of musicians of different faiths, she was tempted to say no. She worried she wouldn't have anything in common with the other players. But she agreed to join the group as a vocalist, and she's glad she did. "We all care about the music, we're all teenagers," said 16-year-old Jamie, who is Jewish and a junior at Thomas Johnson High School in Frederick. "It's a really nice connection. " The band, called Interfaith Rock, was formed in January and includes musicians who are Muslim, Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist and Jewish.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
When you call 911, you want to speak with a dispatcher as soon as possible. But what if, at that moment or in general, you aren't able to speak at all? This past week marked a deadline for phone carriers to be able provide text-to-911 service in areas where dispatchers are ready to receive the messages, according to the FCC. In Maryland, the state wants those capabilities to come online in all jurisdictions at once and is anticipating that it will be ready in four to six months. "It's an aggressive timetable, but it should put Maryland as a statewide leader in the country," said Gordon Deans, executive director of the Emergency Number Systems Board, the state office overseeing the program.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The mother of a Maryland man with Down syndrome who died in police custody last year told a Senate panel Tuesday that the federal government needs to spend more to train law enforcement on how to approach the disabled and mentally ill. Patti Saylor, whose son, Robert "Ethan" Saylor, died of asphyxiation last January while handcuffed on the ground in a Frederick County movie theater, said more should be done to foster relationships between police...
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