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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 20, 2003
The usual distinction between art and illustration is that illustration merely tells us what we already know, whereas true art enlarges our experience of the world. Frederic Remington, the Eastern tenderfoot whose dramatic depictions of cowboys and Indians, cavalrymen and cattle drivers brought him fame and critical acclaim as a chronicler of the authentic Old West in the first years of the 20th century, started out as an illustrator but aspired to be an artist. And for a while, at least, he seemed to have achieved his goal.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 20, 2003
The usual distinction between art and illustration is that illustration merely tells us what we already know, whereas true art enlarges our experience of the world. Frederic Remington, the Eastern tenderfoot whose dramatic depictions of cowboys and Indians, cavalrymen and cattle drivers brought him fame and critical acclaim as a chronicler of the authentic Old West in the first years of the 20th century, started out as an illustrator but aspired to be an artist. And for a while, at least, he seemed to have achieved his goal.
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By Hal Smith and Hal Smith,Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
It's been 15 years since a major Eastern museum has devoted a show to Frederic Remington, America's best-known sculptor, illustrator and painter of the frontier. So for anyone with a passion for American or Western art, the hot ticket this spring will be the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Opening next Sunday, The Color of Night will be the first exhibit devoted entirely to Remington's nocturnes, or night paintings, which are causing art historians to reassess his stature. From 1900 until his death in 1909, Remington produced at least 72 canvases in which he explored the difficulties of painting darkness.
TRAVEL
By Hal Smith and Hal Smith,Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
It's been 15 years since a major Eastern museum has devoted a show to Frederic Remington, America's best-known sculptor, illustrator and painter of the frontier. So for anyone with a passion for American or Western art, the hot ticket this spring will be the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Opening next Sunday, The Color of Night will be the first exhibit devoted entirely to Remington's nocturnes, or night paintings, which are causing art historians to reassess his stature. From 1900 until his death in 1909, Remington produced at least 72 canvases in which he explored the difficulties of painting darkness.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | March 17, 1991
Q: Our father favors Western art and especially admires paintings by Frederic Remington. For his 60th birthday, we'd like to give him an original Remington oil painting, or a fine artist's reproduction or copy of one. Where can we find them? Also, is there a book on Remington's works you can recommend?A: Original oil paintings by Frederic Sackrider Remington (1861- 1909), one of America'a best-known and celebrated Western artists, are sought after for their vivid portrayals of cowboys, Indians, cavalrymen, camp outs, war scenes and Western life.
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman and Bennard Perlman,Special to The Sun | February 13, 1998
Even before the battleship Maine blew up in Havana harbor 100 years ago Sunday, war fever was being nourished in the United States by sensational newspaper reports accompanied by the pen-and-ink sketches of such artists as George Luks, Frederic Remington, William Glackens and others.In this era, before newspaper photos, the use of drawings captured the public imagination. With the largest U.S. cities boasting as many as two dozen daily papers apiece, news illustrations became circulation boosters.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | May 30, 1991
Washington's National Museum of American Art has mounted a show on the American West that has become one of the capital's most controversial exhibitions in memory.The 164 works in "The West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920" are among the most beloved, mainstream and familiar images in the history of American art, including pieces by Frederic Remington, N.C. Wyeth and George Caleb Bingham.Curator William Truettner and the others involved in preparing this exhibition detect and characterize not only racism, bigotry, bullying and greed, but willing complicity on the part of artists to perpetrate myths and skewed views -- whether for political reasons, popular acclaim or financial reward.
NEWS
November 14, 2004
Freedom Fund Dinner slated Saturday by local NAACP branch Carroll County NAACP Branch 7014 will hold its third annual Freedom Fund Dinner at 6 p.m. Saturday at Martin's Westminster. Dr. Levi Watkins Jr., associate dean of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, will be the keynote speaker. He also is a professor of cardiac surgery and the first African-American to hold both positions at Hopkins. Del. Nancy R. Stocksdale, a Westminster Republican, will introduce Watkins. The dinner will be attended by businesspeople, educators, government leaders, church leaders and others interested in promoting the NAACP and its activities.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
From the prairie, to the Rockies and Sierras, to the Pacific, the American West has captured our imagination as no other region of our vast and beautiful country. That point will prove hard to escape when you take in "The Phelan Collection of Western Art," which is on display at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis. The collection of 50 paintings, prints, drawings and photographs from the 19th century revolves around three main themes: scenic splendor, Western settlement and Manifest Destiny's human side.
NEWS
June 21, 1993
Margaret A. NelsonActive in church affairsMargaret A. Nelson, a homemaker who was active in church affairs, died June 10 after a long illness at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 83.Born in Baltimore, Mrs. Nelson was raised in Homeland and was a graduate of the Bryn Mawr School.She was married in 1932 to Arthur L. Nelson, the owner of the Lenderking Metal Products Co., a metal fabrication firm in the Canton area. He died in 1969.A longtime resident of Montrose Avenue in Baltimore County's Murray Hill neighborhood, she was an active participant in the affairs of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer for more than 50 years.
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman and Bennard Perlman,Special to The Sun | February 13, 1998
Even before the battleship Maine blew up in Havana harbor 100 years ago Sunday, war fever was being nourished in the United States by sensational newspaper reports accompanied by the pen-and-ink sketches of such artists as George Luks, Frederic Remington, William Glackens and others.In this era, before newspaper photos, the use of drawings captured the public imagination. With the largest U.S. cities boasting as many as two dozen daily papers apiece, news illustrations became circulation boosters.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | March 17, 1991
Q: Our father favors Western art and especially admires paintings by Frederic Remington. For his 60th birthday, we'd like to give him an original Remington oil painting, or a fine artist's reproduction or copy of one. Where can we find them? Also, is there a book on Remington's works you can recommend?A: Original oil paintings by Frederic Sackrider Remington (1861- 1909), one of America'a best-known and celebrated Western artists, are sought after for their vivid portrayals of cowboys, Indians, cavalrymen, camp outs, war scenes and Western life.
FEATURES
By Melissa Morrison and Melissa Morrison,Dallas Morning News | August 30, 1992
It may be an art-world first: An art collector is suing a sculptor for reproducing her own work.Dallas collector Frank Ribelin filed the suit last month against artist Beverly Pepper. In it, Mr. Ribelin claims that "Ternana Wedge," a cast-iron sculpture he commissioned from Ms. Pepper and for which he paid $90,000, lost value when she created a copy of the piece for the Smithsonian Institution.Ms. Pepper's New York gallery owner, Andre Emmerich, who is also named in the suit, says the pieces differ in size and texture -- that, in fact, they are variations on a theme, a concept that artists, including Degas (with his ballet dancers)
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
Harry Webster Wright, once described as "one of the world's maestros with a gun," died of cardiovascular disease Wednesday at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 89.Mr. Wright won 14 world skeet-shooting championships and was on the All-American skeet-shooting team 12 times. He was inducted into the Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame in 1966 and into the National Skeet Shooting Hall of Fame in Austin, Texas, in 1972."His feats with a 22-gauge astound the imagination," wrote an interviewer for The Sun in 1961, referring to a feat in which Mr. Wright shot his shells as they were ejected from the chamber of his gun. "He could do the same thing with an automatic shotgun."
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