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By CAL THOMAS | April 18, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- I have no idea whether Fred Thompson, former senator from Tennessee, will run for the Republican nomination for president, but he should. He has Ronald Reagan's communication skills and speaks plainly, in ways most people can understand. Anyone who has listened to him substitute for Paul Harvey on ABC News Radio senses that, in this, he follows in Mr. Reagan's footsteps. Mr. Thompson conveys Middle American, common-sense values. When he is asked a question, he doesn't sound as if he's giving a poll-tested, pabulum answer.
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 29, 2007
The Republican presidential debate at Morgan State University ended around 10:30ish Thursday night when I rose from my seat in the Carl Murphy Auditorium and announced to no one in particular, "Boy! That certainly was more fun than skydiving!" I trust you will forgive me for that bit of hyperbole. But the debate among the six Republican candidates considered to have little or no chance at the presidential nomination did have moments both entertaining and informative, so much so I'm inclined to hand out some awards.
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NEWS
November 28, 1996
IN POLITICS, it's never too early. On the day after the Nov. 5 election, former Tenn. Gov. Lamar Alexander let it be known he was ready for a second try four years down the road. He has plenty of contenders to worry about -- Colin Powell, Jack Kemp, Dan Quayle, George Bush the Younger, Christie Whitman, Pat Buchanan, Steve Forbes, Mike Leavitt, John Engler, Tommy Thompson, Trent Lott, John McCain to name a few.But Mr. Alexander's main worry is another Tennessean, Sen. Fred Thompson, the biggest GOP name out of Hollywood since a fellow named Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Former Sen. Fred Thompson left supporters hanging for months before joining the presidential contest. Now he's got them wondering when he'll make his debate debut. The next Republican debate is Sept. 27 in Baltimore, but Thompson's participation appears to be in doubt, in spite of an announcement yesterday from the event's organizers that he would be there. At least three other Republican contenders, including front-runners Rudolph W. Giuliani and Mitt Romney, have balked at attending.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | May 29, 2007
STAMFORD, Conn. -- All right," Fred Thompson told a Connecticut Republican audience. "Let's get the announcement out of the way." After a dramatic pause, the would-be presidential candidate declared: "Law & Order will return for an 18th season."
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook and Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook,Los Angeles Times | March 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives often ridicule Democrats for espousing the "culture of Hollywood." But in the latest sign of Republican discontent with the field of 2008 presidential hopefuls - and in a familiar plot twist - some of those same activists are eyeing a movie actor as the party's potential savior. Fred Thompson, the former senator from Tennessee who once played a White House chief of staff on the big screen and appears now as a politically savvy prosecutor on TV's Law & Order, is positioning himself to answer the call - and perhaps follow the script that saw Ronald Reagan jump from Hollywood to the White House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matea Gold and Scott Collins and Matea Gold and Scott Collins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2005
Just because Fred Thompson has been squiring the new Supreme Court nominee around Capitol Hill doesn't mean he has given up greasepaint. Thompson, a Republican Party stalwart and U.S. senator from 1994 to 2003, is serving as an informal adviser to John G. Roberts Jr., the judge chosen last week by President Bush to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court. But while tutoring Roberts on the finer points of Senate relations, Thompson, 62, will have to squirrel away some time to memorize lines.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
Baltimore broadcasting legend Chuck Thompson is expected to be removed from life support systems today after suffering a stroke that has left him brain dead, his brother said last night. "As it stands now, he would be a vegetable if we would keep him alive," Fred Thompson said. "He was declared brain dead at around 6 [last night]," he said. "All the family got together and we made the decision that he didn't want any parts of this. He's got a living will, and before he said he never did want to linger."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 31, 2007
Washington -- Former Sen. Fred Thompson of Tennessee is about to take a big step toward a formal presidential campaign, a move that will shake up the unsettled Republican field and throw a wild card into the competition for the GOP's conservative core. This week, Thompson asked supporters to begin collecting campaign donations on June 4, after he files papers with the Federal Election Commission to establish a political committee to "test the waters" for a White House bid. The move is the clearest signal to date that Thompson, best-known for playing a gruff district attorney on Law & Order, is shelving his reluctance to join the race.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
IF DEMOCRATS are at the trough, can Republicans be far behind? Or do they get there first, and lap up the biggest share? This is a distressing thought worth pondering as GOP "Team 100" -- a gathering of big contributors at a Florida resort -- winds up its exercise in access. Access being of the chatting-up-your-senator sort, which is heady stuff even if it can't compare to White House coffee klatches for Democratic givers.Democrat Bill Clinton and Republican Senate leader Trent Lott agree on one thing: They both love and believe in political money -- lots of it, in volumes that made the last election the first billion-dollar affair of its kind in history.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | July 11, 2007
Don't look now, but the Republicans' 2008 savior-in-waiting, former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson, turns out not to be as infallible as some might have hoped. At a time when the Bush administration's failures and low approval ratings are drawing comparisons to the dark days of the Nixon White House, it turns out Mr. Thompson has a direct and more damaging connection to the ugly politics of the Watergate era: It has been reported that as a young staff aide on the congressional committee investigating Watergate, he was secretly funneling information to President Richard Nixon and his henchmen.
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Michael Finnegan,Los Angles Times | July 8, 2007
Fred D. Thompson, the former Tennessee senator campaigning for president as a "pro-life" Republican, accepted a lobbying assignment from a family-planning group to persuade the first Bush White House to ease a controversial abortion restriction, according to a 1991 document and five people familiar with the matter. A spokesman for the former senator denied that Thompson did the lobbying work. But minutes of a 1991 board meeting of the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association show that the group hired Thompson that year.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 31, 2007
Washington -- Former Sen. Fred Thompson of Tennessee is about to take a big step toward a formal presidential campaign, a move that will shake up the unsettled Republican field and throw a wild card into the competition for the GOP's conservative core. This week, Thompson asked supporters to begin collecting campaign donations on June 4, after he files papers with the Federal Election Commission to establish a political committee to "test the waters" for a White House bid. The move is the clearest signal to date that Thompson, best-known for playing a gruff district attorney on Law & Order, is shelving his reluctance to join the race.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | May 29, 2007
STAMFORD, Conn. -- All right," Fred Thompson told a Connecticut Republican audience. "Let's get the announcement out of the way." After a dramatic pause, the would-be presidential candidate declared: "Law & Order will return for an 18th season."
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | April 18, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- I have no idea whether Fred Thompson, former senator from Tennessee, will run for the Republican nomination for president, but he should. He has Ronald Reagan's communication skills and speaks plainly, in ways most people can understand. Anyone who has listened to him substitute for Paul Harvey on ABC News Radio senses that, in this, he follows in Mr. Reagan's footsteps. Mr. Thompson conveys Middle American, common-sense values. When he is asked a question, he doesn't sound as if he's giving a poll-tested, pabulum answer.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook and Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook,Los Angeles Times | March 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives often ridicule Democrats for espousing the "culture of Hollywood." But in the latest sign of Republican discontent with the field of 2008 presidential hopefuls - and in a familiar plot twist - some of those same activists are eyeing a movie actor as the party's potential savior. Fred Thompson, the former senator from Tennessee who once played a White House chief of staff on the big screen and appears now as a politically savvy prosecutor on TV's Law & Order, is positioning himself to answer the call - and perhaps follow the script that saw Ronald Reagan jump from Hollywood to the White House.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Former Sen. Fred Thompson left supporters hanging for months before joining the presidential contest. Now he's got them wondering when he'll make his debate debut. The next Republican debate is Sept. 27 in Baltimore, but Thompson's participation appears to be in doubt, in spite of an announcement yesterday from the event's organizers that he would be there. At least three other Republican contenders, including front-runners Rudolph W. Giuliani and Mitt Romney, have balked at attending.
NEWS
By Michael Finnegan and Michael Finnegan,Los Angles Times | July 8, 2007
Fred D. Thompson, the former Tennessee senator campaigning for president as a "pro-life" Republican, accepted a lobbying assignment from a family-planning group to persuade the first Bush White House to ease a controversial abortion restriction, according to a 1991 document and five people familiar with the matter. A spokesman for the former senator denied that Thompson did the lobbying work. But minutes of a 1991 board meeting of the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association show that the group hired Thompson that year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matea Gold and Scott Collins and Matea Gold and Scott Collins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2005
Just because Fred Thompson has been squiring the new Supreme Court nominee around Capitol Hill doesn't mean he has given up greasepaint. Thompson, a Republican Party stalwart and U.S. senator from 1994 to 2003, is serving as an informal adviser to John G. Roberts Jr., the judge chosen last week by President Bush to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court. But while tutoring Roberts on the finer points of Senate relations, Thompson, 62, will have to squirrel away some time to memorize lines.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
Baltimore broadcasting legend Chuck Thompson is expected to be removed from life support systems today after suffering a stroke that has left him brain dead, his brother said last night. "As it stands now, he would be a vegetable if we would keep him alive," Fred Thompson said. "He was declared brain dead at around 6 [last night]," he said. "All the family got together and we made the decision that he didn't want any parts of this. He's got a living will, and before he said he never did want to linger."
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