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By SUSAN REIMER | February 28, 2003
I grew up in Mr. Rogers' neighborhood, and the news of his death at 74 yesterday saddened me just as surely as if he had actually been the gentle man next door. I am a Pittsburgh native, and I have known Fred Rogers - and Daniel Striped Tiger, King Friday XIII and X the Owl - since I was 2 years old. Those were Mr. Rogers' puppet characters on The Children's Corner, an award-winning children's show filmed at WQED, then a nascent public television station in Pittsburgh. Born in Latrobe, Pa., and educated at Rollins College in Florida, Fred Rogers was a "go-fer" for NBC when he quit to go to Pittsburgh to develop a children's show for a station that wouldn't be on the air for a year.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
IT'S SAID that play is the work of children. Now we're taking their jobs away. That's the thesis of Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff. The two developmental psychologists were at the Port Discovery children's museum Thursday. They came to promote play. They had an appreciative audience repeating after them: "Play equals learning! Play equals learning!" Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff have co-authored a delightful book, Einstein Never Used Flash Cards, which decries our Roadrunner society's fixation on teaching kids to read and compute before they're potty-trained, prepping them for Harvard before they can tie their shoes, viewing a "Baby Einstein" video before they know their colors.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Imperiale Wellons and Nancy Imperiale Wellons,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 9, 2001
Sara Joanne Byrd Rogers has been married to a guy named Fred for 49 years as of today. This is not all Joanne has accomplished in 73 years of life. She's a concert pianist, for starters, which is no small potatoes. She also raised two sons and has two grandkids. She's on the board of trustees at Rollins College in her native Florida, where she calls the president by a pet name. She's the bee's knees of a best friend, say her pals - the kind who calls just to check on a little thing that was bothering you. She loves the word "love," and often says "I must say!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 1, 2004
Boohbah. A sneeze? A new Winnie-the-Pooh character? Neither. But those two silly-sounding syllables just may form one of the most important new words learned this year by parents of preschool children. Boohbah is the newest variation in television fare for kids. Created by Anne Wood, the controversial mastermind behind the phenomenally successful television show Teletubbies, the new PBS program is available in 99 million homes. Remember Teletubbies? It's the show criticized because it featured fuzzy little creatures with TV sets inserted into their stomachs.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 6, 1994
The best show on television tonight comes from a program supplier, and a TV personality, much more prevalent in the daytime arena: Fred Rogers, who has left his "Neighborhood" long enough to visit with four very special people, whom he dubs TTC Fred Rogers' Heroes," and profiles very carefully and caringly. But, from Mister Rogers, what else did you expect?* "Apollo Theatre Hall of Fame" (8-10 p.m., Channel 2) -- The big puzzle here is why it took NBC so long to show this tribute, which was taped at the Apollo four months ago. Joining the Hall of Fame: smooth-singing Marvin Gaye, fast-taking Dick Gregory and duck-walking Chuck Berry.
NEWS
February 28, 2003
HE WAS special. Fred Rogers, better known to generations of children by the far more civilized "Mister Rogers," got into television for the best of reasons: because he hated it. It's hard to imagine the gentle giant of children's television hating anything - in his more than 30 years as host of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood," aired on PBS stations across the country, his message to children was unfailingly about love: love of themselves, their lives, their...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 1, 2004
Boohbah. A sneeze? A new Winnie-the-Pooh character? Neither. But those two silly-sounding syllables just may form one of the most important new words learned this year by parents of preschool children. Boohbah is the newest variation in television fare for kids. Created by Anne Wood, the controversial mastermind behind the phenomenally successful television show Teletubbies, the new PBS program is available in 99 million homes. Remember Teletubbies? It's the show criticized because it featured fuzzy little creatures with TV sets inserted into their stomachs.
NEWS
August 3, 1996
RUN YOUR FINGER down the daily television listings and it's hard to say that the offerings geared toward adults are any more enlightening or educational than the baleful fare aimed at children. But at least there is plenty of it, and it's available all day long.Except for the oasis of public television, children's programming is short on both quantity and quality. As a result, too many young Americans spend time watching shows full of sex and violence grossly inappropriate for their age. The few good shows designed for children are often relegated to off-hours less in demand by advertisers or pre-dawn time slots when few children are watching.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
Who can resist Mr. Rogers in his acting debut? If you can resist, there are alternatives, including insects and the return of ALF.* "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It's a beautiful day in Dr. Quinn's neighborhood as Fred Rogers -- yes, Mr. Rogers -- guest stars as a visiting preacher who advises the Rev. Johnson (Geoffrey Lower).Will Mr. R. change into his sneakers once he gets to Colorado Springs? CBS.* "Figure Skating" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Scott Hamilton and Kristi Yamaguchi are among the graceful competitors in the Cotton Incorporated Ultimate 4 competition at Boston's Fleet Center.
NEWS
By Scott Shane | March 4, 2003
WHEN Mr. Rogers came to Baltimore 16 years ago to visit a little girl in a coma, he insisted on one thing only: There would be no publicity. In defiance of all the rules of modern American celebrity, he wanted no touching television footage, no hamming it up for the newspaper photographers, no media throngs trailing him through the corridors of Johns Hopkins Hospital. It would be just Fred Rogers, the troupe of puppets he carried in a clarinet case and 7-year-old Beth Usher. Beth had a rare disorder called Rasmussen's encephalitis that by 1986 was assaulting her with 50 to 100 seizures a day, interfering with school, play and development.
NEWS
By Scott Shane | March 4, 2003
WHEN Mr. Rogers came to Baltimore 16 years ago to visit a little girl in a coma, he insisted on one thing only: There would be no publicity. In defiance of all the rules of modern American celebrity, he wanted no touching television footage, no hamming it up for the newspaper photographers, no media throngs trailing him through the corridors of Johns Hopkins Hospital. It would be just Fred Rogers, the troupe of puppets he carried in a clarinet case and 7-year-old Beth Usher. Beth had a rare disorder called Rasmussen's encephalitis that by 1986 was assaulting her with 50 to 100 seizures a day, interfering with school, play and development.
NEWS
February 28, 2003
HE WAS special. Fred Rogers, better known to generations of children by the far more civilized "Mister Rogers," got into television for the best of reasons: because he hated it. It's hard to imagine the gentle giant of children's television hating anything - in his more than 30 years as host of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood," aired on PBS stations across the country, his message to children was unfailingly about love: love of themselves, their lives, their...
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 28, 2003
I grew up in Mr. Rogers' neighborhood, and the news of his death at 74 yesterday saddened me just as surely as if he had actually been the gentle man next door. I am a Pittsburgh native, and I have known Fred Rogers - and Daniel Striped Tiger, King Friday XIII and X the Owl - since I was 2 years old. Those were Mr. Rogers' puppet characters on The Children's Corner, an award-winning children's show filmed at WQED, then a nascent public television station in Pittsburgh. Born in Latrobe, Pa., and educated at Rollins College in Florida, Fred Rogers was a "go-fer" for NBC when he quit to go to Pittsburgh to develop a children's show for a station that wouldn't be on the air for a year.
FEATURES
By Nancy Imperiale Wellons and Nancy Imperiale Wellons,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 9, 2001
Sara Joanne Byrd Rogers has been married to a guy named Fred for 49 years as of today. This is not all Joanne has accomplished in 73 years of life. She's a concert pianist, for starters, which is no small potatoes. She also raised two sons and has two grandkids. She's on the board of trustees at Rollins College in her native Florida, where she calls the president by a pet name. She's the bee's knees of a best friend, say her pals - the kind who calls just to check on a little thing that was bothering you. She loves the word "love," and often says "I must say!"
NEWS
August 3, 1996
RUN YOUR FINGER down the daily television listings and it's hard to say that the offerings geared toward adults are any more enlightening or educational than the baleful fare aimed at children. But at least there is plenty of it, and it's available all day long.Except for the oasis of public television, children's programming is short on both quantity and quality. As a result, too many young Americans spend time watching shows full of sex and violence grossly inappropriate for their age. The few good shows designed for children are often relegated to off-hours less in demand by advertisers or pre-dawn time slots when few children are watching.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1996
Who can resist Mr. Rogers in his acting debut? If you can resist, there are alternatives, including insects and the return of ALF.* "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- It's a beautiful day in Dr. Quinn's neighborhood as Fred Rogers -- yes, Mr. Rogers -- guest stars as a visiting preacher who advises the Rev. Johnson (Geoffrey Lower).Will Mr. R. change into his sneakers once he gets to Colorado Springs? CBS.* "Figure Skating" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Scott Hamilton and Kristi Yamaguchi are among the graceful competitors in the Cotton Incorporated Ultimate 4 competition at Boston's Fleet Center.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
IT'S SAID that play is the work of children. Now we're taking their jobs away. That's the thesis of Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff. The two developmental psychologists were at the Port Discovery children's museum Thursday. They came to promote play. They had an appreciative audience repeating after them: "Play equals learning! Play equals learning!" Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff have co-authored a delightful book, Einstein Never Used Flash Cards, which decries our Roadrunner society's fixation on teaching kids to read and compute before they're potty-trained, prepping them for Harvard before they can tie their shoes, viewing a "Baby Einstein" video before they know their colors.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
In your notebook, in a room just outside of Mr. Rogers' suite of offices in Pittsburgh's public television station WQED, you jot a short list of must questions."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 6, 1994
The best show on television tonight comes from a program supplier, and a TV personality, much more prevalent in the daytime arena: Fred Rogers, who has left his "Neighborhood" long enough to visit with four very special people, whom he dubs TTC Fred Rogers' Heroes," and profiles very carefully and caringly. But, from Mister Rogers, what else did you expect?* "Apollo Theatre Hall of Fame" (8-10 p.m., Channel 2) -- The big puzzle here is why it took NBC so long to show this tribute, which was taped at the Apollo four months ago. Joining the Hall of Fame: smooth-singing Marvin Gaye, fast-taking Dick Gregory and duck-walking Chuck Berry.
FEATURES
By Patrick A. McGuire and Patrick A. McGuire,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
In your notebook, in a room just outside of Mr. Rogers' suite of offices in Pittsburgh's public television station WQED, you jot a short list of must questions."
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