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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 27, 1991
It used to be that whenever guitarist Bryan Harvey and drummer Johnny Hott got onstage, people would wonder where the rest of the group was. After all, the two were billed as a band -- House of Freaks, to be exact -- and most bands rounded out guitar and drums with bass or keyboards."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 19, 2013
Standing before the students who had assembled at his bakery to learn a bit of his craft, Duff Goldman issued a warning about cake decorating. "It's a very difficult art," he said. "It's very tough. A lot of people cry. Most of you will not succeed. " Then he laughed. "The thing to remember is: It's a cake," he said. "Don't get too freaked out. " But those words had faded more than two hours later as my hand, holding an X-Acto knife, trembled. Goldman, the owner of Charm City Cakes and star of television's "Ace of Cakes," was telling me to cut two circles out of fondant, which would become eyes for the sugary crab that would sit atop my masterpiece.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 9, 2008
Freaks, a film that so unnerved 1932 audiences that it was pulled from circulation after only a few weeks and was practically disowned by its studio, MGM, will be shown tomorrow night at the Creative Alliance, 3134 Eastern Ave., in the old Patterson Theatre. Directed by Tod Browning, hot off the mega-success of his previous year's Dracula, the film stars Harry Earles (whom Browning had worked with on both the silent and sound versions of The Unholy Three) as Hans, a circus midget performing in a traveling carnival, who falls in love with the conniving (and normal-sized)
NEWS
By David Horsey | November 13, 2012
President Obama's re-election has caused right-wingers to become completely unhinged. They are purple-faced and apoplectic, convinced that an ignorant horde of government-dependent social leeches have destroyed traditional America and banished God from the country. The craziest comments came from certifiably loony celebrities. Gun-crazy rocker Ted Nugent tweeted that "Pimps whores and welfare brats and their soulless supporters hav (sic) a president to destroy America," while former "Saturday Night Live" goofball Victoria Jackson let loose a series of tweets, saying in part, "Thanks a lot, Christians, for not showing up. You disgust me ... In the Good vs. Evil battle, today Evil won. " Egomaniacal rich guy Donald Trump simply called for a revolution.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | November 25, 1992
SAN FRANCISCO -- Two of the 1960s' most memorable social movements, the hippie commune and the Jesus freaks, are alive and well in America, two religion researchers report.According to a new study on "The Evolution of Hippie Communal Spirituality," hundreds of hip-era communes survived the 1980s and continue to practice and preach a counterculture lifestyle."The Haight-Ashbury is thriving in Tennessee," says Timothy Miller, a professor of religious studies at the University of Kansas, one of hundreds of religion scholars who attended a joint meeting here of the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 17, 2002
Eight Legged Freaks is flimsy goofball entertainment. It's hard not to feel kind toward a giant-arachnid extravaganza in which the spiders chatter like cartoon chipmunks and the soundtrack features "Itsy-Bitsy Spider." But this cheerful homage to rampaging-mutant movies like Them! (1954) would be more amusing if it weren't so scattershot. The filmmakers are so busy adding half-good jokes that they neglect to build on the decent ones. Director Ellory Elkayem and his co-writer, Jesse Alexander, swiftly introduce their two main ingredients for a summer camp spectacular: a chemical spill outside the failed desert mining town of Prosperity, Ariz.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Sure, there's plenty of angst in high school, a fact that's been the centerpiece of some of TV's best dramas in recent years, from "My So-Called Life" to "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."But there's also tremendous joy in high school, those special moments when even the simplest act of kindness can make your day, when a smile from a seemingly unattainable girl makes everything right with the world, when a word from a caring teacher can make problems seem suddenly solvable.Few television series capture that mix as well as "Freaks and Geeks," an hourlong drama premiering on NBC tonight that will certainly capture the heart of anyone who came of age in the late '70s and early '80s (it's set in 1980)
NEWS
January 21, 1996
Jim Rose's "Freaks Like Me: Real, Raw and Dangerous" and "Freaks, Geeks and Strange Girls: Side Show Banners of the Great American Midway," a collection of essays. Both are new - "instant classic" is written all over them. Rose is the sideshow man for Generation X, his is an autobiography. The second has color plates, beautiful, high gloss reproductions that will knock your eyes out.MA - James Taylor, co-founder and publisher, Dolphin-Moon Press
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | November 14, 1991
Comics' monologues nightly have led To a gaggle of gags about Ted; But since he's repented, It's time they relented And reran their Quayle jokes instead. A greeting no chief of state seeks Except perhaps PLO freaks Is that wonderful way To start off the day -- An Arafat buss on both cheeks.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 15, 2001
Suzan-Lori Parks writes challenging plays filled with poetry, politics and history. Until now, Baltimore hasn't had a chance to see her work. But AXIS Theatre has corrected that oversight with an intriguing production of Parks' boldly theatrical "Venus." The 1996 play is loosely based on the true story of Saartjie Baartman, an African woman with enormous buttocks who was exhibited Elephant Man-style in England in the early 19th century as the Venus Hottentot. Parks tells Venus' story in flashback, beginning with the announcement of her death and interspersing the narrative with historical and medical passages read by a character called the Negro Resurrectionist (a reference to his former occupation of digging up corpses for medical studies)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 15, 2012
Tonight's episode, a two-hour slog through 12 YouTube acts, began with Nick Cannon apologizing for the show before it even got started. He made sure to note that Season Five's YouTube shows yielded Jackie Evancho, who ended up being the runner-up that year. The implicit message was, "Hey, these aren't just some bums from the Internet. " Oh, but they are totally bums from the Internet. Let's meet them before the majority of them go away forever, tomorrow night: Clint Carvalho & His Extreme Parrots: A schlubby guy who trained a cockatoo named Kitten to fly into the "AGT" studio from a building across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
The Woman's Industrial Exchange, famous for its tomato aspic and its no-nonsense waitresses, will reopen in November under the no-nonsense management of food truck owner Irene Smith, who says she is determined to honor the tearoom's traditions that Baltimore held so dear. "The tomato aspic is already on the menu," said Smith, "along with chicken salad. " Smith, who has made her culinary mark with her popular food truck, the Souper Freak, plans to open the day after Thanksgiving, and she hopes to ride the retail wave through Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
With new food trucks rolling out every couple months, it can be hard to keep track of them all. Here are three of the more notable Baltimore food trucks, from burgers to soups. Chowhound Burger Wagon kooperschowhound.com Generally acknowledged as the pace-setter in Baltimore's food truck fleet, Chowhound started serving burgers on the go back in the fall of 2009. Veggie, beef, bison and turkey burgers are cooked on the spot and served alongside regular or sweet potato fries.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
Surgery for a Thurmont boy who was speared by a stingray stinger while fishing on a North Carolina pier was postponed after his health declined, according to news reports. Quentin Tokar had been fishing with family and friends on August 16 when they caught a stingray, and a nearby fisherman asked to keep it. The man removed the barb, which flew through the air and struck the boy in the midsection and hit his liver. It worked its way inside with every breath. Quentin was scheduled to have surgery on Thursday, but his family physician told WJZ-TV that it was postponed.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2010
For Jamie Myers, going to the Preakness and letting loose on the infield is a rite of passage, a youthful, bawdy tradition that, for better or worse, will always remind him of growing up in Baltimore. There are real photos and those just in his mind of the mind-boggling consumption, the young women lifting their T-shirts, the epic carousing. He remembers that time when he and his buddies showed up outside Pimlico at 6 a.m. with two cases of beer, but by the time the gates opened at 9, they'd already drained it. Though he's skipped it for a couple of years, the 34-year-old private school administrator will be back this weekend, hoping to find a taste of the wild Preakness of legend — even though race officials, fearing embarrassment and liability, have tamed the modern infield by barring spectators from bringing in drinks.
SPORTS
November 7, 2008
The injury that knocked out the Houston Texans' leading tackler, Zac Diles, was freakish indeed. Diles was running downfield on a punt coverage drill this week when his left leg snapped. There was no contact involved. The surgery to repair the break to the tibia requires a rod, and Diles is obviously out for the season. Players said they actually heard the break when it happened. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ordine)
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 8, 1998
1996 Bogle Petite Sirah ($11).This California red is made for hard-core flavor freaks, not those with sensitive Euro-palates. It's an ultra-concentrated bombshell of a wine with intense blackberry, plum, wood smoke and chocolate flavors, as well as a "dusty" note reminiscent of the Napa Valley's Rutherford Bench cabernets (which it otherwise resembles not in the least). Unlike many petite sirahs, it's a supple wine that doesn't assault you with raging tannins. It will likely age well, but it's so appealing now there's no reason to bother keeping it.Pub Date: 3/08/98
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 30, 1997
No matter how hard you try, you can't keep some people, like the guy who scaled the left-field foul pole at Oriole Park on Monday night, from making idiots of themselves. But does the public have the right to see idiocy in action and does television have an obligation to show moronic behavior in progress?That's the dilemma that hit Home Team Sports supervising producer Chris Glass stark in the face in the eighth inning, as the man slowly but surely made his way up the pole.Glass, who also was directing Monday, said he had no choice but to show the climb, though he hated doing it."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 11, 2008
For those who want to celebrate All Saint's Day in July, Hellboy II: The Golden Army spills over with goblins, trolls and elves like a Halloween horn of plenty. Guillermo del Toro designs this follow-up to his 2004 Hellboy as a war between the magical and fearsome creatures who roamed J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth and C.S. Lewis' Narnia and a handful of agents from the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Defense, including the burly red demon Hellboy (Ron Perlman) and the female human torch Liz Sherman (Selma Blair)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | June 8, 2008
ELMONT, N.Y. -- Jockey Kent Desormeaux never had a clue about what was coming yesterday afternoon. His horse, Big Brown, was eager in the saddling area, almost fresh with the saddle pony before being loaded into the gate and had plenty of run going into the first turn. "I thought when I got outside those horses going into the first turn, I said, `That's it, the race is over, I got it.' Fortunately, there's no popped tires. He's just out of gas. "About the five-eighths pole, I was keeping an eye on the horse in front and I thought, `OK, let's engage and let's at least keep him honest,' and I was done.
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