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NEWS
June 3, 2002
AT SOME POINT in the mid-1990s, something happened in major-league baseball. From 1980 through 1995, an average of about 13 players from both leagues hit 30 or more home runs in one season. But from 1996 through 2001, that average jumped to 39 players a season. And since 1999, it's been more than 43. What could have happened? Better diet and training? Smaller parks, tighter strike zones, livelier balls and too few good pitchers? Or how about the growing use by players of steroids, growth hormones, amphetamines, ephedrine supplements and a long list of other performance enhancers?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
  Christian Siriano is going from Fashion Week to "Freak Show. " The "Project Runway" vet, who was born and raised in Annapolis and attended the Baltimore School for the Arts, will be using his keen fashion sense to judge a costume design competition tied to FX's horror-drama series "American Horror Story. " Announced today to celebrate the launch of "AHS's" fourth season, "Freak Show," the contest "invited participants with an eye for the unusual to design an original costume inspired by the series," according to a press release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 15, 2012
Tonight's episode, a two-hour slog through 12 YouTube acts, began with Nick Cannon apologizing for the show before it even got started. He made sure to note that Season Five's YouTube shows yielded Jackie Evancho, who ended up being the runner-up that year. The implicit message was, "Hey, these aren't just some bums from the Internet. " Oh, but they are totally bums from the Internet. Let's meet them before the majority of them go away forever, tomorrow night: Clint Carvalho & His Extreme Parrots: A schlubby guy who trained a cockatoo named Kitten to fly into the "AGT" studio from a building across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Soderberg | August 15, 2012
Tonight's episode, a two-hour slog through 12 YouTube acts, began with Nick Cannon apologizing for the show before it even got started. He made sure to note that Season Five's YouTube shows yielded Jackie Evancho, who ended up being the runner-up that year. The implicit message was, "Hey, these aren't just some bums from the Internet. " Oh, but they are totally bums from the Internet. Let's meet them before the majority of them go away forever, tomorrow night: Clint Carvalho & His Extreme Parrots: A schlubby guy who trained a cockatoo named Kitten to fly into the "AGT" studio from a building across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
  Christian Siriano is going from Fashion Week to "Freak Show. " The "Project Runway" vet, who was born and raised in Annapolis and attended the Baltimore School for the Arts, will be using his keen fashion sense to judge a costume design competition tied to FX's horror-drama series "American Horror Story. " Announced today to celebrate the launch of "AHS's" fourth season, "Freak Show," the contest "invited participants with an eye for the unusual to design an original costume inspired by the series," according to a press release.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 17, 1995
FLUSHING, N.Y. -- Fresh from the ring and still short of breath, the Golden Gloves winner, in regulation black satin Everlast trunks, was exultant:"Awesome. Awesome. This is the best rush in the whole world."And then Kathleen Collins, 23, ran a hand through her hair -- blond highlights matted with sweat -- and struggled out of her molded plastic breast protector."I really feel like a great fighter right now," Ms. Collins said.She'd never had the chance before. No women had, not once in the 68-year tradition of New York's vaunted Golden Gloves amateur boxing tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 26, 2006
Spank Rock The lowdown -- The now at least semi-famous electro-hip-hop group Spank Rock returns to its hometown Saturday for a monster throw-down at the Ottobar. The group is in the middle of a months-long international tour, during which it has supported Beck and Gnarls Barkley, among others. In short, a Spank Rock show is one huge party. You really won't want to miss it. If you go -- The music starts at 10 p.m. Tickets are $12 for the 18 and older show. The Ottobar is at 2549 N. Howard St. Information: 410-662-0069 or go to theottobar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | October 15, 2000
One hot, sweaty August day a few years back, my friend Tom and I decided to take in a freak show at the Wisconsin State Fair. It wasn't something we'd normally do. Tom was the kind of guy who wore bow ties, and I've never exactly been Ms. Let-It-All-Hang-Loose. For some reason, the meshing of our personalities resulted in weirdly spontaneous behavior. The sideshow was made up of several mobile homes, each containing a different attraction. We paid admission to one, and went inside. It wasn't air-conditioned, so the lights were turned off to minimize the heat.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner's surprising decision to drop out of the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination marathon disappointed the party's moderates. His reasons revealed a weakness that dooms most presidential hopefuls: He showed a concern for something besides winning. Concern for kids and kin is a fine quality in most human beings, but professional political handlers will tell you that it only gets in the way of a presidential campaign. To paraphrase a drill sergeant's advice from my Army days: If the campaign wants you to have a family, it will issue you one. In every other way, Mr. Warner appeared to have all of the ingredients for a strong presidential run. He was a successful red-state governor with strong appeal among swing voters in NASCAR America, who Democrats want to lure back.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen | October 13, 1996
PARENTS, WE have a problem. And we can't pretend that we don't just because it's embarrassing to discuss.Somehow we have lost our way and forgotten what is important. The buzz word is "values," but the term has been devalued from reckless and frequent use. We talk about "caring" for our children. What do we mean by "caring"? Hillary Rodham Clinton is right. It does take a village.A Barbie village.We've seen what our children have done to their Barbie dolls. But they are our Barbies, too. We must stop the madness.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 11, 2008
For those who want to celebrate All Saint's Day in July, Hellboy II: The Golden Army spills over with goblins, trolls and elves like a Halloween horn of plenty. Guillermo del Toro designs this follow-up to his 2004 Hellboy as a war between the magical and fearsome creatures who roamed J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth and C.S. Lewis' Narnia and a handful of agents from the Bureau of Paranormal Research and Defense, including the burly red demon Hellboy (Ron Perlman) and the female human torch Liz Sherman (Selma Blair)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 26, 2006
Spank Rock The lowdown -- The now at least semi-famous electro-hip-hop group Spank Rock returns to its hometown Saturday for a monster throw-down at the Ottobar. The group is in the middle of a months-long international tour, during which it has supported Beck and Gnarls Barkley, among others. In short, a Spank Rock show is one huge party. You really won't want to miss it. If you go -- The music starts at 10 p.m. Tickets are $12 for the 18 and older show. The Ottobar is at 2549 N. Howard St. Information: 410-662-0069 or go to theottobar.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Former Virginia Gov. Mark Warner's surprising decision to drop out of the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination marathon disappointed the party's moderates. His reasons revealed a weakness that dooms most presidential hopefuls: He showed a concern for something besides winning. Concern for kids and kin is a fine quality in most human beings, but professional political handlers will tell you that it only gets in the way of a presidential campaign. To paraphrase a drill sergeant's advice from my Army days: If the campaign wants you to have a family, it will issue you one. In every other way, Mr. Warner appeared to have all of the ingredients for a strong presidential run. He was a successful red-state governor with strong appeal among swing voters in NASCAR America, who Democrats want to lure back.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 13, 2003
Carnivale, HBO's new drama set in the backstage world of a spooky carnival troupe traveling though the Dust Bowl Southwest during the Great Depression, is dark, deep and scary. It's the stuff of which cold-sweat nightmares are made. And, after screening three episodes, I am as hooked on this moody, hypnotic saga as I've been on any drama since The Sopranos. I'm not saying this is going to be the next Sopranos. It's too idiosyncratic and strange for that. At best, Carnivale is more likely to become the kind of passionate but offbeat pleasure that Twin Peaks was for the cult of viewers that felt comfortable with dancing dwarves who spoke backward and nonlinear story lines that combined waking and dream states in a way that only producer David Lynch seemed to understand.
NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 2001
"No one with a history of back trouble should attempt the part of Merrick as contorted," writes Bernard Pomerance in a prefatory comment to his play "The Elephant Man." Good advice, since the role of title character John Merrick is a hideously deformed "show freak" who lives in Victorian London during the latter part of the 19th century. Under Susan G. Kramer's able direction, the student-alumni actors in the play at Howard Community College manage to bring off a stalwart, if uneven, production that captures the essence of the drama but struggles with its complexities and textures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Staff | October 15, 2000
One hot, sweaty August day a few years back, my friend Tom and I decided to take in a freak show at the Wisconsin State Fair. It wasn't something we'd normally do. Tom was the kind of guy who wore bow ties, and I've never exactly been Ms. Let-It-All-Hang-Loose. For some reason, the meshing of our personalities resulted in weirdly spontaneous behavior. The sideshow was made up of several mobile homes, each containing a different attraction. We paid admission to one, and went inside. It wasn't air-conditioned, so the lights were turned off to minimize the heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | February 6, 1997
GRIDLOCK'dThe Soundtrack (Death Row 90114)Although critics are raving about Tupac Shakur's portrayal of a heroin addict in "GRIDLOCK'd," what he does on screen is only part of his contribution to the film. Listen to the soundtrack from "GRIDLOCK'd," and you'll also hear him rapping -- doing, in fact, some of the strongest work of his career. Granted, there's not a lot of it; 2Pac turns up on just three of the album's 15 tracks, and only one, the fierce "Never Had a Friend Like Me," is a solo performance.
NEWS
By Arthur Laupus and Arthur Laupus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 2001
"No one with a history of back trouble should attempt the part of Merrick as contorted," writes Bernard Pomerance in a prefatory comment to his play "The Elephant Man." Good advice, since the role of title character John Merrick is a hideously deformed "show freak" who lives in Victorian London during the latter part of the 19th century. Under Susan G. Kramer's able direction, the student-alumni actors in the play at Howard Community College manage to bring off a stalwart, if uneven, production that captures the essence of the drama but struggles with its complexities and textures.
NEWS
By Joshua Kurlantzick and Joshua Kurlantzick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1999
PHUKET, Thailand -- Just outside the Chinese-Thai shrine, a crowd mills around a long row of men whose faces are pierced with knives, swords and other sharp objects.Seemingly unimpressed, members of the crowd barely give these faces a second glance. At the end of the row of men, a small audience has formed around an innovative Thai adolescent who has pushed a small lamp through one cheek, between his teeth, and out the other cheek. "Now that's original," says a tourist.For almost 200 years, residents of Thailand's Phuket Island have held their nine-day Vegetarian Festival, in which believers abstain from eating meat and mutilate their bodies to demonstrate their faith.
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