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Fraud

BUSINESS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,STAFF WRITER | October 21, 1995
The president of Wye River Inc., the Eastern Shore-based marketer of seafood seasonings and other products, was charged yesterday with defrauding the Food Lion grocery chain of more than $300,000.Beginning in 1988 and continuing until August 1993, Joseph L. Bernard III overcharged the grocery chain by listing inflated prices on invoices, according to federal prosecutors.The company produces and markets seasonings for crabs, plus other products such as crab soup, tartar sauce and seafood cocktail sauce.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 18, 2004
FIFTY-FIVE minutes into his opening statement in the Nathan Chapman fraud case, federal prosecutor Jefferson Gray's voice rose from its dreary monotone, thus nearly awakening several courtroom spectators from apparent narcoleptic stupor. But the moment passed, all remained slumberous, and Gray droned on a little longer. He used language that only occasionally bisected colloquial English. He had stirring phrases such as "adherence to provisions of documents." He said "fiduciary" a lot. A couple of jurors seemed to hang on for dear life, awaiting the arrival of a turn of phrase that sounded like the mother tongue.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue and Lorene Yue,Your Money | February 13, 2005
Lots of buyers and sellers have discovered the fun and profit of dealing with Internet auction sites. Unfortunately, so have plenty of crooks. Fraud represented 61 percent of the more than 635,000 consumer complaints received by the Federal Trade Commission last year. Fraud related to any type of Internet activity dominated, while problems specifically tied to Internet auctions (nondelivery, lower value than promised, delays) ranked highest among complaints. Experts recommend a thorough reference check before doing business with an unknown seller, avoiding wire transfer services for making payment and being leery of escrow services suggested by the seller.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
WASHINGTON -- A California gambler yesterday filed suit against Autotote Systems Inc., alleging that the company's widely used wagering equipment is so badly designed and operated that honest bettors have lost millions of dollars to fraud. Jimmy "The Hat" Allard, who described himself as an actor turned professional "racehorse analyst," said the admission of bet rigging by a former Autotote computer programmer prompted him to file the class-action suit. "For years, I have said I believe somebody is getting into the computers and I believe somebody is past-posting us," Allard said at a news conference at the National Press Club.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
Three shareholders have filed a $55 million fraud lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Baltimore against the chairman and former officers and directors of Novatek International Inc., the Columbia-based company under federal investigation for stock fraud.Meanwhile, Joseph E. "Chick" Celentano, a Connecticut businessman, has filed a separate $3 million civil suit claiming he was defrauded by his cousin, Vincent D. Celentano, a Florida businessman who is one of Novatek's major shareholders.In a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Connecticut, Joseph Celentano charges his cousin induced him to invest in Novatek and a related venture in Russia, Health Care, Ltd., using false and misleading information.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2005
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - HealthSouth Corp. founder and fired chief executive Richard M. Scrushy was a "cunning" and "hands-on leader" who directed a $2.7 billion accounting fraud and enriched himself as he fooled investors, a prosecutor told jurors yesterday at the start of Scrushy's fraud trial. "You're going to hear evidence that Richard Scrushy knew about the conspiracy, that he participated in the conspiracy and that he profited from the conspiracy," U.S. Attorney Alice H. Martin told jurors in her opening statement.
BUSINESS
By THE DENVER POST | March 16, 2005
The Securities and Exchange Commission sued 12 former Qwest Communications International Inc. executives - including one-time chief executive officer Joseph P. Nacchio - yesterday for allegedly inflating the company's financial performance and misleading investors. The SEC described Qwest under Nacchio as "a culture of fear" with subordinates desperate to meet his demands to hit revenue targets. The SEC accused the executives of a "massive financial fraud" that caused Qwest to record about $3 billion in false revenue and helped inflate its stock to cinch its 2000 merger with U S West, a regional phone company.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | October 29, 1996
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Nobel laureate David Baltimore, his career ravaged by a decade-long scientific fraud case that was only recently judged baseless, called yesterday for major changes in the way government and academia pursue alleged misconduct and blasted "self-appointed fraud police" who presume scientists are guilty until proven innocent.In his first extended public comments on the case, Baltimore, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor of immunology and molecular biology, also had harsh words for his critics, calling them "scurrilous," "pernicious," "bulldogs" and "out of control."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
After escaping prosecution for more than two decades by using threats of voodoo against potential witnesses, a woman who authorities said had a hand in the deaths of three lovers was convicted yesterday of fraudulently collecting the victims' life insurance benefits. Josephine Virginia Gray, 55, of Upper Marlboro was found guilty on eight counts of mail and wire fraud by a federal jury in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt. Prosecutors said she collected $165,000 in insurance money after two husbands were shot to death in Montgomery County and a young boyfriend was found dead in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | May 17, 1991
R. Brooke Boyle, a former Bel Air car dealer, pleaded guilty today to two criminal counts in what prosecutors have called one of the biggest white-collar fraud cases in Harford County.Boyle, 29, whose family has been well-known in the car business in the county since the 1930s, pleaded guilty before Harford County Circuit Court Judge William O. Carr to one count of fraud and one count of writing a bad check.Last fall, Boyle was charged in a 76-count indictment, including more than 40 counts of theft, alleging that he stole nearly $300,000 from 26 customers, suppliers and other businesses between August 1988 and October 1989, when he was forced out of business.
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