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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1994
DALLAS -- National Medical Enterprises Inc., one of the nation's largest psychiatric hospital chains, said yesterday that it would plead guilty to paying kickbacks and bribes for referrals, even as a former executive admitted to arranging $20 million to $40 million of these payments -- and then scheming to get Medicare reimbursement.The company said it had agreed to pay $362.7 million and admit today or tomorrow to seven charges, in what would be the largest settlement ever between the government and a health care provider.
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NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | January 31, 1999
BY OPENING a telephone hot line to report "waste, fraud and abuse," Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens hopes to improve the management of government.I have no problem with county employees reporting their suspicions about wrongdoing. Who better would know if a fellow employee is stealing equipment, office supplies or money from the county till, or throwing a contract to an in-law?My concern is that by guaranteeing anonymity to the callers, the county investigators may be overwhelmed with useless information rather than useful tips on corruption.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
WASHINGTON -- A California gambler yesterday filed suit against Autotote Systems Inc., alleging that the company's widely used wagering equipment is so badly designed and operated that honest bettors have lost millions of dollars to fraud. Jimmy "The Hat" Allard, who described himself as an actor turned professional "racehorse analyst," said the admission of bet rigging by a former Autotote computer programmer prompted him to file the class-action suit. "For years, I have said I believe somebody is getting into the computers and I believe somebody is past-posting us," Allard said at a news conference at the National Press Club.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1991
Robert Shulman, Bolar Pharmaceutical Inc.'s former president, chief executive and board chairman, has pleaded guilty to conspiracy, obstruction of justice and other charges tied to fraud in the company's generic-drug operation.First Assistant U.S. Attorney Gary P. Jordan said in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday that Shulman also has agreed to plead guilty to an unspecified antitrust violation to be filed here soon by the U.S. Department of Justice.Lawrence G. McDade, assistant director of the Justice Department's consumer litigation office, told Judge John R. Hargrove yesterday that Shulman and Jacob H. "Jack" Rivers, Bolar's former executive vice president, masterminded the company's massive fraud to skirt federal procedures in the manufacture and sale of its highly profitable products for six years.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue and Lorene Yue,Your Money | February 13, 2005
Lots of buyers and sellers have discovered the fun and profit of dealing with Internet auction sites. Unfortunately, so have plenty of crooks. Fraud represented 61 percent of the more than 635,000 consumer complaints received by the Federal Trade Commission last year. Fraud related to any type of Internet activity dominated, while problems specifically tied to Internet auctions (nondelivery, lower value than promised, delays) ranked highest among complaints. Experts recommend a thorough reference check before doing business with an unknown seller, avoiding wire transfer services for making payment and being leery of escrow services suggested by the seller.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
The first member of an international Nigerian fraud ring to be sentenced in the case was rewarded this week for his cooperation with federal agents and prosecutors, which helped them piece together the complicated organization.Ehi Joseph Macaulay,31, who was based in Burbank, Calif., could have received as much as two years and three months in federal prison without the possibility of parole for conspiring to commit credit card fraud.Instead, prosecutors asked U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake in Baltimore on Wednesday to go easy on the Nigerian national and sentence him to 18 months in prison with the chance that he could serve some of that time under home detention.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Unisys Corp. has agreed to plead guilty to fraud and bribery charges arising from Operation Ill Wind, the wide-ranging probe of defense procurement practices, and will pay $190 million in fines and forfeited profits, government and company officials said yesterday.The settlement, which includes the largest defense fraud penalty ever, is to be filed today in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., officials said.The Pennsylvania-based company is expected to plead guilty to charges that it employed a variety of schemes to rig bids on lucrative defense contracts, create secret slush funds, hire corrupt consultants and funnel bribes to government officials.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2005
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - HealthSouth Corp. founder and fired chief executive Richard M. Scrushy was a "cunning" and "hands-on leader" who directed a $2.7 billion accounting fraud and enriched himself as he fooled investors, a prosecutor told jurors yesterday at the start of Scrushy's fraud trial. "You're going to hear evidence that Richard Scrushy knew about the conspiracy, that he participated in the conspiracy and that he profited from the conspiracy," U.S. Attorney Alice H. Martin told jurors in her opening statement.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | October 29, 1996
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Nobel laureate David Baltimore, his career ravaged by a decade-long scientific fraud case that was only recently judged baseless, called yesterday for major changes in the way government and academia pursue alleged misconduct and blasted "self-appointed fraud police" who presume scientists are guilty until proven innocent.In his first extended public comments on the case, Baltimore, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor of immunology and molecular biology, also had harsh words for his critics, calling them "scurrilous," "pernicious," "bulldogs" and "out of control."
BUSINESS
By THE DENVER POST | March 16, 2005
The Securities and Exchange Commission sued 12 former Qwest Communications International Inc. executives - including one-time chief executive officer Joseph P. Nacchio - yesterday for allegedly inflating the company's financial performance and misleading investors. The SEC described Qwest under Nacchio as "a culture of fear" with subordinates desperate to meet his demands to hit revenue targets. The SEC accused the executives of a "massive financial fraud" that caused Qwest to record about $3 billion in false revenue and helped inflate its stock to cinch its 2000 merger with U S West, a regional phone company.
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