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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1994
DALLAS -- National Medical Enterprises Inc., one of the nation's largest psychiatric hospital chains, said yesterday that it would plead guilty to paying kickbacks and bribes for referrals, even as a former executive admitted to arranging $20 million to $40 million of these payments -- and then scheming to get Medicare reimbursement.The company said it had agreed to pay $362.7 million and admit today or tomorrow to seven charges, in what would be the largest settlement ever between the government and a health care provider.
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NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | January 31, 1999
BY OPENING a telephone hot line to report "waste, fraud and abuse," Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens hopes to improve the management of government.I have no problem with county employees reporting their suspicions about wrongdoing. Who better would know if a fellow employee is stealing equipment, office supplies or money from the county till, or throwing a contract to an in-law?My concern is that by guaranteeing anonymity to the callers, the county investigators may be overwhelmed with useless information rather than useful tips on corruption.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | October 13, 2006
NEW YORK -- Mark P. Kaiser, former marketing chief of Royal Ahold NV's U.S. unit, was falsely accused of helping lead a fraud at the company by a colleague trying to win leniency from prosecutors, his lawyer told jurors yesterday at the start of Kaiser's trial. Kaiser is the last of more than 15 people to face criminal charges stemming from what the government says was an $800 million fraud at Columbia, Md.-based U.S. Foodservice. In his opening statement, defense lawyer Richard Morvillo said his client was falsely implicated by former purchasing chief Timothy Lee, who later pleaded guilty.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1997
The first member of an international Nigerian fraud ring to be sentenced in the case was rewarded this week for his cooperation with federal agents and prosecutors, which helped them piece together the complicated organization.Ehi Joseph Macaulay,31, who was based in Burbank, Calif., could have received as much as two years and three months in federal prison without the possibility of parole for conspiring to commit credit card fraud.Instead, prosecutors asked U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake in Baltimore on Wednesday to go easy on the Nigerian national and sentence him to 18 months in prison with the chance that he could serve some of that time under home detention.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1991
Robert Shulman, Bolar Pharmaceutical Inc.'s former president, chief executive and board chairman, has pleaded guilty to conspiracy, obstruction of justice and other charges tied to fraud in the company's generic-drug operation.First Assistant U.S. Attorney Gary P. Jordan said in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday that Shulman also has agreed to plead guilty to an unspecified antitrust violation to be filed here soon by the U.S. Department of Justice.Lawrence G. McDade, assistant director of the Justice Department's consumer litigation office, told Judge John R. Hargrove yesterday that Shulman and Jacob H. "Jack" Rivers, Bolar's former executive vice president, masterminded the company's massive fraud to skirt federal procedures in the manufacture and sale of its highly profitable products for six years.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue and Lorene Yue,Your Money | February 13, 2005
Lots of buyers and sellers have discovered the fun and profit of dealing with Internet auction sites. Unfortunately, so have plenty of crooks. Fraud represented 61 percent of the more than 635,000 consumer complaints received by the Federal Trade Commission last year. Fraud related to any type of Internet activity dominated, while problems specifically tied to Internet auctions (nondelivery, lower value than promised, delays) ranked highest among complaints. Experts recommend a thorough reference check before doing business with an unknown seller, avoiding wire transfer services for making payment and being leery of escrow services suggested by the seller.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 4, 1999
NEW YORK -- The sentencing of Patrick Bennett, convicted of 42 fraud and money-laundering counts in what prosecutors called the nation's biggest Ponzi scheme, was postponed yesterday as a federal judge threatened to impose a longer jail term if Bennett does not reveal where the stolen money went.Prosecutors said thousands of small investors were cheated in the $700 million scheme by Bennett, 46, former chief financial officer of Syracuse, N.Y.-based Bennett Funding Group Inc.Long jail term possibleU.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2005
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - HealthSouth Corp. founder and fired chief executive Richard M. Scrushy was a "cunning" and "hands-on leader" who directed a $2.7 billion accounting fraud and enriched himself as he fooled investors, a prosecutor told jurors yesterday at the start of Scrushy's fraud trial. "You're going to hear evidence that Richard Scrushy knew about the conspiracy, that he participated in the conspiracy and that he profited from the conspiracy," U.S. Attorney Alice H. Martin told jurors in her opening statement.
NEWS
By Orange County Register | April 9, 1993
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- It was a life of lies and not love, jurors concluded as they sided with an Orange County banker who sued his wife for marital fraud.The price tag for no passion: $242,000 for starters. A Santa Ana judge will decide Monday if Ronald Askew also should collect four pieces of property he and his estranged wife own.Ronald Askew sued his wife of 17 years for fraud, alleging that she lied when she said she loved him before their wedding day."If you're not going to be honest with each other, why get #F married?"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, the former wife of Nelson Mandela who was once exalted as the "Mother of the Nation," was convicted of dozens of charges of theft and fraud yesterday. Madikizela-Mandela, 66, considered one of the most powerful figures in this country's fight against apartheid, could be sentenced to 15 years in jail on 43 counts of fraud and 25 counts of theft. A business associate, Andy Moolman, was found guilty of 58 charges of fraud and 25 of theft.
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