Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFraud
IN THE NEWS

Fraud

BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 15, 2004
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands - The former chief executive officer and former chief financial officer of Royal Ahold NV, the Dutch food retailer that inflated profit for three years, were charged with fraud yesterday in a court here. Former CEO Cees van der Hoeven and Michiel Meurs, one-time finance chief, were charged after a judge rejected their objections to the criminal case, said Anthony Jagroop, a spokesman for the prosecutor. Former board members Jan Andreae and Ronald Fahlin also were charged, Jagroop said.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 21, 2007
A Woodstock man pleaded guilty yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to participating in a scheme to fraudulently bill Medicaid for more than $4 million in services that were never performed, according to the Maryland attorney general's office. Guy Anthony Bell, 44, of the 2700 block Tallow Tree Road was the chief financial officer from October 2002 until April 2004 for the Bridges Project, which provides psychiatric rehabilitation and therapy for children and adults in Baltimore, according to prosecutors.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | September 25, 2007
Denise Stanco was desperate. Trying to stop a theft from her checking account in progress, the 54-year-old information technology specialist frantically e-mailed her last hope - in the Kingdom of Bahrain. In three e-mail messages, the Catonsville resident explained that someone swiped her debit-card number, faked a passport in her name and purchased two tickets worth $1,201 on Bahrain's Gulf Air. Stanco pleaded with someone, anyone to help her. Everyone she turned to thus far had disappointed her, since she'd learned from a credit-monitoring service that someone had used her debit-card number to purchase Gulf Air tickets, Birkenstocks and Asian Air tickets.
FEATURES
By Karen Croke and Karen Croke,New York Daily News | January 22, 1991
NEW YORK -- Four years ago, a Scottish school teacher paid $3,000 for a bride. It wasn't a dowry. It was a down payment on a green card.A marriage of convenience "seemed an easy way to stay in the country," says the teacher, 28, whose student visa had expired. An intermediary arranged for him to marry a gay woman from Brooklyn.In the film "Green Card," Gerard Depardieu plays a Frenchman who weds a Manhattan botanist (Andie MacDowell) for the same reason: to get a green card, which will entitle him to live and work in the United States.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 31, 1993
NEW YORK -- The state bribery and fraud trial involving the defunct Bank of Credit and Commerce International began yesterday in a small crowded courtroom in Manhattan, and opening statements by prosecution and defense lawyers made it clear that Clark M. Clifford, the former defense secretary and adviser to presidents, would be prosecuted, in effect, in absentia.Mr. Clifford is in a hospital in Washington recovering from heart bypass surgery. But his co-defendant and law partner, Robert A. Altman, faced the jury as the 2-year-old scandal involving the internationally political and influential bank finally reached a courtroom.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1994
DALLAS -- National Medical Enterprises Inc., one of the nation's largest psychiatric hospital chains, said yesterday that it would plead guilty to paying kickbacks and bribes for referrals, even as a former executive admitted to arranging $20 million to $40 million of these payments -- and then scheming to get Medicare reimbursement.The company said it had agreed to pay $362.7 million and admit today or tomorrow to seven charges, in what would be the largest settlement ever between the government and a health care provider.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | January 31, 1999
BY OPENING a telephone hot line to report "waste, fraud and abuse," Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens hopes to improve the management of government.I have no problem with county employees reporting their suspicions about wrongdoing. Who better would know if a fellow employee is stealing equipment, office supplies or money from the county till, or throwing a contract to an in-law?My concern is that by guaranteeing anonymity to the callers, the county investigators may be overwhelmed with useless information rather than useful tips on corruption.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
When Maxim Healthcare Services settled one of the government's largest-ever medical fraud cases last week, the Medicaid and Veterans Affairs contractor agreed to pay $150 million and implement a host of corporate reforms. But Maxim, a Columbia-based home health and medical staffing company founded by Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti, avoided the penalty that would have the biggest impact on its bottom line: disbarment from federal health care programs. That's the case with nearly all of the companies ever charged with cheating government programs — including thousands of health care companies that are defendants in most of the cases and that settled civil charges for a record $2.5 billion in the 2010 fiscal year.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1996
RICHMOND -- Crestar Financial Corp. Chairman Richard G. Tilghman told shareholders yesterday that the huge fraud that has rocked a competing bank could not have happened at the company he runs.Mr. Tilghman said Crestar -- with assets of $18 billion -- has checks and balances that would have detected the fraud that has cost its neighbor, Signet Banking Corp., $81 million.Upon learning about the fraud, Mr. Tilghman said, "My first question to our chief credit officer was: 'What can you tell me to assure me that this would not happen to this institution?
BUSINESS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,STAFF WRITER | October 21, 1995
The president of Wye River Inc., the Eastern Shore-based marketer of seafood seasonings and other products, was charged yesterday with defrauding the Food Lion grocery chain of more than $300,000.Beginning in 1988 and continuing until August 1993, Joseph L. Bernard III overcharged the grocery chain by listing inflated prices on invoices, according to federal prosecutors.The company produces and markets seasonings for crabs, plus other products such as crab soup, tartar sauce and seafood cocktail sauce.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.