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Fraud

NEWS
September 17, 1990
A Baltimore man has been sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay restitution of $249,000 for his involvement in a scheme to defraud the state's Medicaid program.An investigation by the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit found that Sherman L. Snell received $249,003 after submitting false claims. Snell and Steven Herlich, the former owner of the Medicine Shoppe in Baltimore, received more than $450,000 from Medicaid after submitting the claims.Snell forged prescriptions and submitted invoices to the state's medical assistance program from 1986 to April 1989.
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NEWS
By Lucy Conger and Lucy Conger,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1990
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's leading opposition parties accused the government yesterday of widespread vote fraud in Sunday's elections in the populous, industrialized state of Mexico.[Hundreds of demonstrators calling for the end of Mexico's ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) marched through the capital yesterday to protest the alleged fraud, Reuters reported.["Death to the PRI" and "Death to electoral fraud" were among slogans chanted by an estimated 1,500 protesters as they marched on the Interior Ministry, snarling rush-hour traffic, Reuters reported.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | January 13, 2008
The Federal Communications Commission is warning businesses that people posing as hearing-impaired consumers have been misusing the Internet-based telecommunications relay service (TRS) to commit fraudulent business transactions. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and FCC regulations require that calls made using TRS be "functionally equivalent" to telephone calls. Reaching a specially trained communications assistant on TRS and instructing them to make a call is, in effect, the same as receiving a dial tone.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 10, 1995
LIMA, Peru -- President Alberto Fujimori appeared to be on his way to a landslide re-election victory yesterday, but the balloting was questioned by opposition candidates who alleged massive fraud leading up to Peru's presidential vote.Mr. Fujimori, who imposed one-man rule three years ago but also succeeded in crushing hyperinflation and a violent rebel insurgency, won 62 percent of the vote, according to an exit poll by the CPI firm. He took 60 percent, according to a poll by the Apoyo firm.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- The U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan has begun a federal criminal investigation of Prudential Securities and suspected fraud by brokers and managers, sources close to the inquiry said.Launched over a month ago, the probe was broadened within the past week to include the firm's huge limited partnership program, which took in $6 billion from investors in the 1980s and resulted in big losses.The sources said that federal prosecutors were looking into the possible payment of kickbacks and attempted bribes to senior Prudential Securities officials by outside companies that managed individual partnership programs.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 15, 2004
AMSTERDAM, Netherlands - The former chief executive officer and former chief financial officer of Royal Ahold NV, the Dutch food retailer that inflated profit for three years, were charged with fraud yesterday in a court here. Former CEO Cees van der Hoeven and Michiel Meurs, one-time finance chief, were charged after a judge rejected their objections to the criminal case, said Anthony Jagroop, a spokesman for the prosecutor. Former board members Jan Andreae and Ronald Fahlin also were charged, Jagroop said.
NEWS
September 21, 2007
A Woodstock man pleaded guilty yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to participating in a scheme to fraudulently bill Medicaid for more than $4 million in services that were never performed, according to the Maryland attorney general's office. Guy Anthony Bell, 44, of the 2700 block Tallow Tree Road was the chief financial officer from October 2002 until April 2004 for the Bridges Project, which provides psychiatric rehabilitation and therapy for children and adults in Baltimore, according to prosecutors.
FEATURES
By Karen Croke and Karen Croke,New York Daily News | January 22, 1991
NEW YORK -- Four years ago, a Scottish school teacher paid $3,000 for a bride. It wasn't a dowry. It was a down payment on a green card.A marriage of convenience "seemed an easy way to stay in the country," says the teacher, 28, whose student visa had expired. An intermediary arranged for him to marry a gay woman from Brooklyn.In the film "Green Card," Gerard Depardieu plays a Frenchman who weds a Manhattan botanist (Andie MacDowell) for the same reason: to get a green card, which will entitle him to live and work in the United States.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 31, 1993
NEW YORK -- The state bribery and fraud trial involving the defunct Bank of Credit and Commerce International began yesterday in a small crowded courtroom in Manhattan, and opening statements by prosecution and defense lawyers made it clear that Clark M. Clifford, the former defense secretary and adviser to presidents, would be prosecuted, in effect, in absentia.Mr. Clifford is in a hospital in Washington recovering from heart bypass surgery. But his co-defendant and law partner, Robert A. Altman, faced the jury as the 2-year-old scandal involving the internationally political and influential bank finally reached a courtroom.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1994
DALLAS -- National Medical Enterprises Inc., one of the nation's largest psychiatric hospital chains, said yesterday that it would plead guilty to paying kickbacks and bribes for referrals, even as a former executive admitted to arranging $20 million to $40 million of these payments -- and then scheming to get Medicare reimbursement.The company said it had agreed to pay $362.7 million and admit today or tomorrow to seven charges, in what would be the largest settlement ever between the government and a health care provider.
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