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NEWS
November 10, 2011
Many thanks to Jay Hancock for his interesting article about the Justice Department accusing Kernan Hospital of fraud in presenting a diagnosis of kwashiorkor in the billing for a number of patients ("Feds charge fraud in Kernan diagnoses," Nov. 8). I find it hard to believe that any medical personnel would be so stupid as to bill for patients with a wildly unlikely diagnosis of kwashiorkor. It seems more likely that a billing clerk entered an erroneous ICD (international classification of disease)
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Several months ago, Baltimore Inspector General Robert H. Pearre Jr. quietly decided to dedicate an agent solely to investigating workers' compensation and disability fraud within Baltimore's police and fire departments — and this week investigators announced charges against a former city officer accused of bilking taxpayers out of more than $30,000. It's an effort Pearre plans to continue in future months, city officials said. Pearre has negotiated a deal with the police and fire departments to fund a full-time position in his office digging into what he calls "uniform fraud" — a move he expects to "bear significant fruit," he wrote in a recent report.
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BUSINESS
February 5, 2010
Columbia-based Micros Systems Inc. said Thursday that it overstated revenue by $6.9 million and pretax income by $4.4 million over the past five years because of fraud by a Japanese subsidiary. The company, which supplies information systems to the hospitality and retail industry, said the overstatements weren't enough to adjust previous earnings statements. Micros also said that fiscal second quarter earnings for the period ended Dec. 31 were flat at $26.1 million, or 32 cents per share.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The chief financial officer of Prince George's County public schools and his wife resigned Monday, after the Maryland Insurance Administration found that the couple committed fraud on their personal insurance. The school system is also ordering "external independent auditors to confirm there are no improprieties" relating to its $1.8 million budget, according to a statement issued by board chairman Segun Eubanks and schools chief executive Kevin Maxwell. The Baltimore Sun informed school officials Friday of the insurance agency's findings that chief financial officer Colby White, and his wife, Keisha White, an auditor for the schools, knowingly submitted false information to an insurance company last year in an attempt to receive payment for a lost diamond ring that another insurer had covered six months earlier.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | July 12, 2010
About 11,000 dead people in seven states, including Maryland, have gotten government heating aid over the past year or so, according to congressional investigators. They say that the grave is cold, but it's illegal to receive energy subsidies when your address is six feet under. Plenty of other Marylanders may also be ripping off the $5 billion Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, to judge from last month's report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office. In the seven states, the GAO found households receiving more than $100 million in benefits even though recipients weren't sufficiently documented on state records as being eligible.
NEWS
February 6, 2010
Federal prosecutors say a man has pleaded guilty to wire fraud in a plot to defraud a client of $950,000. Fifty-two-year-old Wilkins McNair, formerly of Ellicott City, entered the plea Friday. He will be sentenced March 5. Court documents indicate that McNair, a CPA, was retained by a woman whose husband had died to probate the estate and manage a family trust. Prosecutors say McNair deposited all of the money into accounts he controlled and used the money to pay salary and other expenses at his accounting firm.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
A Morgan State University professor was convicted Tuesday in connection with a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation and his students. Manoj Kumar Jha, 46, of Severn faces 20 years in prison for each of four counts of wire fraud, and for one count each of mail fraud and falsification of records; and a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison for theft of government property, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. He is scheduled to be sentenced in July. Jha, who was director of the university's Center for Advanced Transportation and Infrastructure Engineering Research, was accused of fraudulently obtaining $200,000 in grant funds from the NSF's Small Business Technology Transfer program in 2008 and 2009, and attempting to obtain another $500,000 through the same program.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
An Upper Marlboro mortgage broker has admitted to inflating her clients' incomes so that they would qualify for larger mortgage loans - a scheme that caused lenders to lose more than $1.3 million, officials said. Licensed mortgage broker and the owner of the Newgate Mortgage company, Shola Risikat Balogun, pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court to conspiracy to commit wire fraud in connection with a plot she led to make money off loan origination fees, commissions and other premiums, according to a statement from the U.S. Attorney's Office for Maryland.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
A Glen Burnie woman who tried to obtain oxycodone with a stolen prescription has been charged with fraud. Christina Marie Rodgers, 30, of the 100 block Oak Springs Drive, faces numerous fraud offenses and theft under $100. Staff at the pharmacy in the 300 block Hospital Drive in Glen Burnie called police June 27, when the suspect presented a stolen prescription for 60 tablets of the narcotic. Police discovered several other stolen prescriptions in the suspect's possession as well as six tablets, thought to be fraudulently obtained oxycodone, police said.
NEWS
By Robert Little | February 20, 2010
Federal lawmakers have asked St. Joseph Medical Center to turn over three years of billing records and other documents related to cardiac care, saying they are troubled by reports of unnecessary coronary stents implanted at the Towson hospital and want to investigate for signs of Medicare fraud. Montana Sen. Max Baucus and Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley - the top Democrat and senior Republican, respectively, on the Senate Finance Committee - also asked the hospital for records of its financial relationship with manufacturers of the medical devices.
NEWS
Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Buying a diamond ring is always a costly expense. Claiming to lose it — twice — came at an even steeper price for Colby White, chief financial officer for Prince George's County public schools. The Maryland Insurance Administration has ruled White and his wife, Keisha, who works as an internal auditor for the school system, committed insurance fraud by filing a claim for a lost diamond ring that another insurer had already paid $16,313 to replace months earlier. The agency said the couple "knowingly violated" Maryland insurance law in filing two claims for the same loss.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
The founder of a Baltimore County-based company that provided insurance to nightclubs and bars who was previously charged with misleading regulators now faces additional charges. The new charges of wire fraud and money laundering mean Jeffrey Cohen, the former CEO of Indemnity Insurance Corp., could face a stiffer sentence if convicted. Officials said he could be sentenced to an additional 120 years imprisonment if convicted on all counts. He was previously facing 15 years in prison for each of five counts of making false statements to an insurance regulator.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The owner of an Owings Mills medical firm is accused of defrauding Medicare and Medicaid of more than $7.5 million in a federal indictment unsealed Monday. Federal prosecutors say Alpha Diagnostics owner Rafael Chikvashvili, 67, of Baltimore created false examination reports, submitted insurance claims for medical procedures that were never performed by licensed physicians, and overbilled Medicare and Medicaid, among other fraudulent acts. The X-ray company's offices in Owings Mills and Harrisburg, Pa., were raided last October by the FBI. Chikvashvili directed his employees, who were not doctors, to interpret X-rays, medical tests, ultrasounds and cardiological exams, rather than paying licensed physicians to do the work, the indictment alleged.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
Baltimore's top lawyer said Wednesday that the state's attorney's office has partnered with the city inspector general to investigate allegations that the Mayor's Office of Information Technology paid contractual employees for work they didn't perform. City Solicitor George A. Nilson, who supervises city Inspector General Robert H. Pearre Jr., confirmed that Baltimore prosecutors are now involved in the probe. "They have been working together," Nilson said. "I do know that the investigation is not 100 percent complete.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
A federal judge in Baltimore ordered Maryland elections officials to adopt an online absentee voting tool in time for this year's general election, despite warnings from computer security experts that the system could lead to voter fraud. The ruling was sought by a group of disabled voters and the National Federation of the Blind, who say the tool will make it easier for people with disabilities to cast ballots without relying on another person. "The court today has protected the fundamental rights of voters with disabilities, including the rights to equal access and to a secret ballot," said Mark Riccobono, president of the federation.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The recent report by Election Integrity Maryland that there may be as many as 164 individuals who voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the 2012 election hasn't exactly caused the Maryland Board of Elections to press the panic button. There's a reason for that: The numbers don't prove fraud and more likely point to clerical error. That's not to suggest the Fairfax County Electoral Board should not seek criminal investigation, as officials announced last week, into 17 possible cases of duplicate voting in that Northern Virginia county - such due diligence is entirely appropriate - but the chances that such incidents will result in fraud convictions are slim.
NEWS
March 23, 2005
AS IF Baltimore's school system weren't financially challenged enough trying to correct a major deficit, it was the victim of a $3 million, decade-long fraud scheme, allegedly by a business contractor who has recently been indicted by a city grand jury. While the fraud preceded the current school administration, the indictment is yet another reminder of the importance of having good financial and management controls in place. As outlined by the grand jury, Gilbert Sapperstein of Baltimore County, the longtime owner and operator of All State Boiler Co., was allegedly involved in two billing schemes in the city.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Morgan State University professor was sentenced Friday to three years in prison and will pay $105,726 in restitution in connection with a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation and his students, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Manoj Kumar Jha, 47, of Severn, was convicted in April of wire fraud, mail fraud, falsification of records and theft of government property. Jha fraudulently obtained $200,000 in grants from the National Science Foundation and used it for personal expenses, the U.S. attorney's office said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A former city school board member and city government worker who is accused of lying about his resume will be tried in court on fraud charges this fall. Anthony A. Hamilton, 35, who resigned from the school board as well as from the city's Health Department last August, used another man's Social Security number and student identification number to pretend to have degrees he didn't earn, prosecutors said in charging documents. Hamilton, who faces six fraud-related charges, was arraigned on Monday and has a trial scheduled for Oct. 27. His attorney could not be reached for comment.
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