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By BOSTON GLOBE | February 11, 1999
Dartmouth College, which helped inspire the drunken and debauched antics in the movie "Animal House," says its storied fraternities will begin admitting women next fall, the first step toward what is likely to be the complete transformation of the Greek system on campus.The trustees and college President James Wright said in a letter announcing the decision Tuesday that it was aimed at encouraging "respectful relations between women and men" and ensuring "opportunities to meet and learn from, as well as develop enduring friendships with, others who have different backgrounds, experiences, and expectations."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Samuel E. Jackson Jr., a retired research psychologist who was a longtime active member of Kappa Alpha Psi, an historically black fraternity, died Sept. 1 at Howard County General Hospital of heart failure. He was 80. "He was a beacon of light in the community and an elder for young men," said Herb Jenkins, general manager of public sector operations for Xerox Corp. and a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, who said he benefited from Mr. Jackson's generosity of spirit and sense of caring.
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NEWS
By SUZANNE LOUDERMILK and SUZANNE LOUDERMILK,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Responding to neighbors' complaints about noise and rowdiness, Towson State University officials have promised to take a hard line toward off-campus fraternities and sororities -- possibly even seeking to have their national charters revoked.Charles Maloy, acting vice president of student life, says the university will take legal action against disruptive Greek groups. "The university remains committed to a Greek system, but only a strong Greek system," said Dr. Maloy, who will meet Oct. 18 with the school's 31 fraternities and sororities to discuss the problems.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 13, 2014
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony G. Brown claimed the endorsement of the Maryland State Fraternal Order of Police Wednesday, breaking a string of three general elections in which the union has backed the Republican candidate. The state FOP opted to support Brown over Republican Larry Hogan at its state convention in Solomons. According to the Brown campaign, the union's rules required the support of delegates representing at least 60 percent of the statewide membership to endorse a candidate.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- This is worshiping with a twist.More than 800 people packed the auditorium of Theodore Roosevelt High School one recent Saturday. Dressed in jeans, sweats, T-shirts and sneakers, they applauded wildly for teen-agers who delivered a series of fast-clapping, foot-stomping, hallelujah-shouting dances.This is also stepping with a twist.Stepping -- a precision, cadenced dance in which performers establish a rhythm with lightning-speed hand and foot moves -- has long been a tradition at colleges with historically black fraternities and sororities.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 25, 1993
DURHAM, N.C. -- In subfreezing weather, as Saturday became Sunday, the Rev. Will Willimon watched as Duke University students reveled around a bonfire they had fueled with campus benches."
NEWS
April 13, 2010
Police crack down on Frostburg binge drinking Maryland State Police say they are joining local law enforcement in a springtime crackdown on binge drinking in Frostburg, home to Frostburg State University. Capt. James Pyles said the effort began Friday and will continue through the spring. Besides increased patrols and visibility, police say they are collecting and analyzing intelligence on house parties held by unrecognized fraternities that are little more than drinking clubs.
NEWS
February 8, 1995
Denis Leyne, 57, a former Canadian banker acquitted in April of smuggling arms for the Irish Republican Army, died Sunday after a heart attack. On April 26, a jury acquitted him and others of conspiring to smuggle 2,900 mining detonators and a $50,000 Stinger missile to the IRA.Rayford T. Saucer, 72, assistant training officer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's first seven astronauts and a Veterans Affairs psychologist, died Saturday in...
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Correspondent Michael K. Burns of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article, along with the New York Times News Service | October 7, 1990
COLLEGE PARK -- Homecoming Week, a celebration with nightly beer busts in years past, kicks off at the University of Maryland College Park tomorrow amid a new campus rule that threatens to crimp the historic rituals.Effective this week, fraternities and sororities are banned from serving alcohol at weeknight social events, with an exemption for this Thursday only.Wild parties don't go along with the "top 10" academic image the university is cultivating, educators said in explaining the ban.And this fall's opening round of parties, when police were called to break up fights, was the last straw.
NEWS
By SUZANNE LOUDERMILK and SUZANNE LOUDERMILK,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Responding to neighbors' complaints about noise and rowdiness, Towson State University officials have promised to take a hard line toward off-campus fraternities and sororities -- possibly even seeking to have their national charters revoked.Charles Maloy, acting vice president of student life, says the university will take legal action against disruptive Greek organizations. "The university remains committed to a Greek system, but only a strong Greek system," said Dr. Maloy, who will meet Oct. 18 with the university's 31 fraternities and sororities to discuss the problems.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
When Brian Stewart accused a local fraternity chapter at Morgan State University of discriminating against him for being gay late last year, the university stressed its commitment to diversity and began investigating. The two results, Stewart said this week, were that the Alpha Iota chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi was placed on probation for breaking university discrimination policies, and Stewart became an even bigger target of harassment  on the school's Baltimore campus. "I had figures - hidden by the shadows of a campus residence hall and the night sky -- yell threats to me intentionally calling me a [gay slur]
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, Erica L. Green and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The Johns Hopkins University has come under fire for not disclosing to the campus an alleged rape at a fraternity house, leading a group of students to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education and others to stage a protest Friday. Amid the pressure, President Ronald J. Daniels said Friday that the university would immediately begin an independent review of how the case was handled, and officials pledged "scrupulous self-examination. " Officials also defended their commitment to campus safety.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 14, 2014
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the college fraternity with a prized pipeline to the halls of power, has banned the initiation of new members after at least 10 deaths since 2006 were linked to hazing, alcohol or drugs at fraternity events. "As an organization, we have been plagued with too much bad behavior, which has resulted in loss of lives, negative press and large lawsuits," said Bradley Cohen, head of the national governing body. "We have taken our bloodline for the fraternity - our new members - and treated them as second-class citizens.
FEATURES
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
A fraternity chapter at Morgan State accused of discriminating against a student because he is gay has been placed on probation until fall 2015, university officials said Tuesday. In late October, senior Brian Stewart filed a formal complaint with the university alleging that the chapter rejected him because he is gay, offering derogatory social media messages he said were sent between fraternity members as proof. Morgan spokesman Jarrett Carter Sr. said a disciplinary panel investigating the complaint found that the Alpha Iota chapter violated university policies on discrimination.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Morgan State University has opened an investigation into a student's allegation that members of a fraternity he wanted to join rejected him because he is gay. Brian Stewart said he dreamed of joining Morgan's chapter of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity and thought members would be impressed by his academic accomplishments - Stewart said he was a White House intern - but he was rejected the day after his interview. He believes it is because of his sexual orientation, citing social-media messages using an anti-gay slur that someone sent him and told him were between fraternity members.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A former instructor at the Naval Academy was sentenced Monday to 60 days in a military jail for indecent acts, fraternization and conduct unbecoming an officer stemming from an incident with two female midshipmen in 2011, an academy spokeswoman said. Marine Corps Maj. Mark Thompson, 43, was also fined $2,500 per month for two years — for a total of $60,000 — and issued a reprimand, a punitive letter that now becomes part of his permanent record, spokeswoman Jenny Erickson said.
NEWS
October 25, 2008
Gas-fired power plant a step closer to reality Competitive Power Ventures, a Silver Spring-based company that plans to build a natural gas-fired power plant in Charles County, said yesterday that it has largely completed the state environmental permit process. Joel M. Bright, a hearing examiner for the Public Service Commission, has granted a certificate of public convenience and necessity needed to build and operate the plant. His order becomes effective next month unless the commission decides to modify it. The company is in discussions with local officials over the use of reclaimed water for cooling purposes at the plant.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
Students at the University of Maryland, College Park are planning to prepare more than 100,000 meals in a single day, to be donated to people in need. The meal packages will contain rice, soy, dehydrated vegetables and a vitamin powder. The event will likely involve between 500 and 1,000 students, many from the campus's fraternities and sororities, and will take place toward the end of October in a large campus facility, though a specific date and place have not yet been set. The idea began with Jonathan Fix, 19, who just completed his freshman year at College Park.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
An interesting detail emerged after a gray Chevy Cobalt hit two Baltimore police officers Wednesday and led dozens of patrol cars and a police helicopter on a chase: the state license plates affixed to the car started with "FPD" and carried a law-enforcement style, star-shaped insignia. Baltimore police said the car was driven by Alycia Marie Hoffman, 25, a Bel Air woman with a lengthy arrest record, according to court records. She has no known law enforcement background and did not own the car. Released through the Fraternal Order of Police Maryland State Lodge, the plates were issued to a retired Harford County deputy sheriff who owns the car, Maryland FOP president Rodney Bartlett said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The Recher Theatre in Towson could face a liquor board hearing on its weekend event that drew an unruly crowd of 2,500 people, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said today. County police believe the theater subcontracted out promotion and management of the event to a third party, he said during a news conference this morning. “And I've got a real problem with someone who does that,” Kamenetz said, adding that Police Chief James W. Johnson would forward information to the county liquor board if he deems it appropriate.
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