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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 20, 1994
The announcement that NBC would move it to Tuesdays has been the buzz of the television industry for months. It sent "Roseanne" high-tailing to safe harbor before it ever arrived. And, last week, it won the Emmy for best comedy.No spinoff in recent years has achieved, so quickly, the kind of near-instant ratings success and critical acclaim that "Frasier" has enjoyed in its first season.And, based on the new episode of the "Cheers" spinoff -- which airs at 9 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2) -- it looks as though Year Two is only going to be better for the sitcom about the talk-show psychiatrist in Seattle.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 14, 2004
After 11 years, NBC's Frasier ended its acclaimed run last night with Dr. Frasier Crane (Kelsey Grammer) quoting Tennyson to his Seattle radio audience and then flying off to Chicago in pursuit of a woman named Charlotte (Laura Linney) whom he had met just three weeks ago. Along the way were a birth, a wedding, low farce and some of the most highly intelligent sitcom writing prime time network television is ever likely to see. Final episodes of long-running series are almost impossible to craft, and this one had its flaws.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | September 17, 1998
"Frasier" star Kelsey Grammer, taking his cue from Andre Braugher, also thanked Baltimore after winning an Emmy on Sunday, noting that he'd worked here in Charm City once. Apparently, he wasn't kidding -- at least not about the working here part. According to his publicist, Grammer, before striking TV gold as Frasier Crane, appeared in a 1981 production of "Othello" at the Morris Mechanic Theatre, opposite stars James Earl Jones and Christopher Plummer. At the time, Sun theater critic R.H. Gardner said he "liked" Grammer's performance as Cassio.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | September 17, 1998
"Frasier" star Kelsey Grammer, taking his cue from Andre Braugher, also thanked Baltimore after winning an Emmy on Sunday, noting that he'd worked here in Charm City once. Apparently, he wasn't kidding -- at least not about the working here part. According to his publicist, Grammer, before striking TV gold as Frasier Crane, appeared in a 1981 production of "Othello" at the Morris Mechanic Theatre, opposite stars James Earl Jones and Christopher Plummer. At the time, Sun theater critic R.H. Gardner said he "liked" Grammer's performance as Cassio.
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By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel | December 16, 1993
He's the toast of Hollywood, this little dog.This fall, he made his television debut as Eddie, the bad-boy dog who stares at Frasier Crane, the psychiatrist on NBC's "Frasier." Then came a segment on "Entertainment Tonight." Now his snout is gracing the cover of Entertainment Weekly.Not bad for a dog who used to roll in cow dung in Lake County, Fla.The Jack Russell terrier, whose real name is Moose, was born on Christmas Eve 1989, the last puppy born in the litter but oddly the biggest. His owners, Sam and Connie Thise, sold three of the puppies but kept Moose.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 14, 2004
After 11 years, NBC's Frasier ended its acclaimed run last night with Dr. Frasier Crane (Kelsey Grammer) quoting Tennyson to his Seattle radio audience and then flying off to Chicago in pursuit of a woman named Charlotte (Laura Linney) whom he had met just three weeks ago. Along the way were a birth, a wedding, low farce and some of the most highly intelligent sitcom writing prime time network television is ever likely to see. Final episodes of long-running series are almost impossible to craft, and this one had its flaws.
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By Joyce Millman and Joyce Millman,San Francisco Examiner | October 19, 1993
Baby boomers used to believe that life ended at 30. Then, thanks to TV, life began at thirtysomething. Now, with the TV generation clocking in at 40 and beyond, and apprehensively dealing with their own kids' surly teenhood, the tube has once again come through with a boomer fountain of youth.It's called aging parents. Prime time is filled these days with 40-year-old adolescents still rebelling against Mom and Dad.On ABC's "Roseanne," Roseanne Connor has one daughter who eloped at 18, another who has the disposition of Wednesday Addams and a 12-year-old son who has just started skipping school.
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By David Zurawik | May 15, 2004
An audience of 25.4 million viewers tuned into NBC Thursday night for the finale of Frasier, according to preliminary overnight ratings from Nielsen Media Research. That means the long-running sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as Dr. Frasier Crane drew only about half the audience that tuned into NBC May 6 for the end of Friends (52 million). While 25.4 million is a fairly large audience, it is certainly not one for the record books. The finale of M*A*S*H on CBS was seen in 1983 by 105 million viewers - the largest audience for a final episode in network history.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
You stand in line outside for as long as an hour. You have to wait almost as long for the big event to start. And depending on how many scene and costume changes are required, what takes a half-hour to watch on television may take two, three or four times that to sit through in person.And they expect you to find it all laugh-out-loud funny?That's pretty much how it works in the world of taped-before-a-studio-audience television. The fact that it works is testimony to the quality of the writing and acting or the willingness of studio audiences to do what they're told.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 16, 1993
The most important thing to know about the new NBC sitcom "Frasier" is that it airs at 9:30 Thursday nights right after "Seinfeld." If the "Cheers" spinoff can't make it there, it can't make it anywhere on the NBC schedule."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 20, 1994
The announcement that NBC would move it to Tuesdays has been the buzz of the television industry for months. It sent "Roseanne" high-tailing to safe harbor before it ever arrived. And, last week, it won the Emmy for best comedy.No spinoff in recent years has achieved, so quickly, the kind of near-instant ratings success and critical acclaim that "Frasier" has enjoyed in its first season.And, based on the new episode of the "Cheers" spinoff -- which airs at 9 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2) -- it looks as though Year Two is only going to be better for the sitcom about the talk-show psychiatrist in Seattle.
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By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel | December 16, 1993
He's the toast of Hollywood, this little dog.This fall, he made his television debut as Eddie, the bad-boy dog who stares at Frasier Crane, the psychiatrist on NBC's "Frasier." Then came a segment on "Entertainment Tonight." Now his snout is gracing the cover of Entertainment Weekly.Not bad for a dog who used to roll in cow dung in Lake County, Fla.The Jack Russell terrier, whose real name is Moose, was born on Christmas Eve 1989, the last puppy born in the litter but oddly the biggest. His owners, Sam and Connie Thise, sold three of the puppies but kept Moose.
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By Joyce Millman and Joyce Millman,San Francisco Examiner | October 19, 1993
Baby boomers used to believe that life ended at 30. Then, thanks to TV, life began at thirtysomething. Now, with the TV generation clocking in at 40 and beyond, and apprehensively dealing with their own kids' surly teenhood, the tube has once again come through with a boomer fountain of youth.It's called aging parents. Prime time is filled these days with 40-year-old adolescents still rebelling against Mom and Dad.On ABC's "Roseanne," Roseanne Connor has one daughter who eloped at 18, another who has the disposition of Wednesday Addams and a 12-year-old son who has just started skipping school.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1996
It's the night of the sweeps-week guest stars, as Shelley Long visits "Frasier," George Hamilton shows up "The John Larroquette Show," and the space shuttle astronauts drop in on "Home Improvement." Such riches*"Married With Children" (6:30 p.m.-7 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Vanna White offers $1 million for a night with Al. Let's hope Al never saw "Goddess of Love."*"Cliffhanger" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Sylvester Stallone is such a bad actor it almost hurts, but at least here the photography is distracting.
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By Steve McKerrow | May 13, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Talk about type-casting. Have you seen the curious new commercial for a certain riding lawn mower, in which Kelsey Grammer of "Cheers" is the surprising pitchman? It proves once again that what's important in TV advertising is merely image, not substance.In the ad, Grammer basically plays his "Cheers" part of Dr. Frasier Crane, the fuddy-duddy psychiatrist. He tells people that they need "professional help" with their lawns, and praises the virtues of this particular mower.
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