Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFranz Schubert
IN THE NEWS

Franz Schubert

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | February 11, 1991
Beethoven's String Quartet in C-sharp Minor, Opus 131 is one of his final contributions to Western music and considered among his greatest achievements. It's also one of his most personal pieces, and monumentally challenging to bring off.Yesterday's performance of the work by the Baltimore String Quartet in Westminster Hall was the highlight of a concert which included Mozart's String Quartet in G Major, K. 387 (one of six dedicated to Joseph Haydn) and the String Quartet No. 9 in G Minor by an 18-year-old Franz Schubert (posthumously published)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 21, 2014
Members of the Columbia Orchestra get to explore compositions written for smaller ensembles when they perform a free chamber concert on Sunday, April 27, at 3 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Most of the pieces involve quartet and quintet configurations playing music written for woodwinds, strings, piano and brass; and there's even going to be a place on stage for a hammered dulcimer. So, it's basically a chance for musicians belonging to a large orchestra to work on a smaller scale.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
Like our renowned orchestras, the world's great string quartets have fashioned personalized reputations for their music-making.For songful elegance, it's hard to beat the Quartetto Italiano, which did remarkable things with Beethoven and Schubert a generation ago.The Guarneri Quartet conveys a larger-than-life presence with a passionate devotion to inner harmonic detail, while plummy sound and jewel-like precision continue to guarantee the Alban Berg Quartet...
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 2001
"It sometimes seems to me as if I did not belong to this world at all," Franz Schubert is reported to have said. And no wonder. The composer lived for much too short a time - 31 years - and encountered an appalling lack of appreciation for his talents during his lifetime. But he left behind an abundance of sublime music, more than enough to guarantee immortality. To open its 15th anniversary season, the Concert Artists of Baltimore sampled the Schubert legacy Saturday evening at the College of Notre Dame's LeClerc Hall.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 21, 2014
Members of the Columbia Orchestra get to explore compositions written for smaller ensembles when they perform a free chamber concert on Sunday, April 27, at 3 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Most of the pieces involve quartet and quintet configurations playing music written for woodwinds, strings, piano and brass; and there's even going to be a place on stage for a hammered dulcimer. So, it's basically a chance for musicians belonging to a large orchestra to work on a smaller scale.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
The marketing of classical music has always been an uphill battle. Only a minuscule fraction of record, tape and CD buyers go into the stores looking for Beethoven instead of Beastie Boys. But what classical music lovers lack in numbers they more than make up in devotion.That's why getting a wider audience hooked on classics can add up to big bucks over time -- and why record companies, concert promoters and local musical organizations are always on the lookout for new ways to pique the interest of pop music listeners.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 29, 2001
"It sometimes seems to me as if I did not belong to this world at all," Franz Schubert is reported to have said. And no wonder. The composer lived for much too short a time - 31 years - and encountered an appalling lack of appreciation for his talents during his lifetime. But he left behind an abundance of sublime music, more than enough to guarantee immortality. To open its 15th anniversary season, the Concert Artists of Baltimore sampled the Schubert legacy Saturday evening at the College of Notre Dame's LeClerc Hall.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | May 3, 1991
The year Franz Schubert finished the "Great" Symphony No. 9 was his last. The Viennese composer in 1828 was syphilitic, poor, depressed, 31 and dying. The working conditions are always hard to imagine when hearing the symphony's beauty.And so again last night. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, led by music director David Zinman scooping up armfuls of great sounds, gave a diligent reading at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Waves of melodic invention (and repetition) broke over the audience. (Schubert of course wrote the "Unfinished" 8th symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2005
Eats Ellicott City's Serafino's, long a favorite for pizza and takeout, now offers 220 seats, a bar, a banquet room and welcoming atmosphere. Italian favorites are still the main attraction, though. page 16 Stage Franz Schubert found inspiration in the poetry of Wilhelm Muller, and the result is two song cycles, one of which -- Die schone Mullerin -- will be performed tomorrow at Evergreen House by baritone Randall Scarlata and pianist Jeremy Denk. page 12 Family The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore reopens this weekend with a "Spring Thaw" celebration.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH | September 8, 2006
Very tall, very thin, very gifted - and prone to very animated behavior onstage - English tenor Ian Bostridge has become one the world's most-respected vocal artists over the past dozen or so years. No one on the scene today burrows more deeply into the genre known as lieder (German art songs) or extracts more compelling insights in the process. There's a keen intellect at work in everything Bostridge does, as well as a richly poetic streak that gives his music-making a rare beauty.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
Like our renowned orchestras, the world's great string quartets have fashioned personalized reputations for their music-making.For songful elegance, it's hard to beat the Quartetto Italiano, which did remarkable things with Beethoven and Schubert a generation ago.The Guarneri Quartet conveys a larger-than-life presence with a passionate devotion to inner harmonic detail, while plummy sound and jewel-like precision continue to guarantee the Alban Berg Quartet...
NEWS
January 5, 1995
The marketing of classical music has always been an uphill battle. Only a minuscule fraction of record, tape and CD buyers go into the stores looking for Beethoven instead of Beastie Boys. But what classical music lovers lack in numbers they more than make up in devotion.That's why getting a wider audience hooked on classics can add up to big bucks over time -- and why record companies, concert promoters and local musical organizations are always on the lookout for new ways to pique the interest of pop music listeners.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | February 11, 1991
Beethoven's String Quartet in C-sharp Minor, Opus 131 is one of his final contributions to Western music and considered among his greatest achievements. It's also one of his most personal pieces, and monumentally challenging to bring off.Yesterday's performance of the work by the Baltimore String Quartet in Westminster Hall was the highlight of a concert which included Mozart's String Quartet in G Major, K. 387 (one of six dedicated to Joseph Haydn) and the String Quartet No. 9 in G Minor by an 18-year-old Franz Schubert (posthumously published)
NEWS
By Judah Adashi and Judah Adashi,special to the sun | November 17, 2006
Classical voice recitals have a reputation for being rather staid affairs. While they rarely lack for beautiful music, diverse and entertaining programs can be hard to come by. How, then, to account for a vocal concert that includes a Cole Porter-Franz Schubert hybrid arranged by John Greer, titled "I've Got Faust under My Skin"? Or Tom Lehrer's gleeful paean to promiscuity, "I Got It from Agnes" ("She got it from Harry/Who got it from Marie/And everyone knows that Marie/Got it from me")
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1998
The phones at Annapolis Symphony headquarters have been ringing constantly this week because David McGill, one of the world's premier bassoonists, will perform with the orchestra at Maryland Hall this weekend, playing Carl Maria von Weber's grand, happy Bassoon Concerto."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.