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Franz Liszt

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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2002
Perhaps it's the echoes of all those gypsy violins wafting in the air. Whatever the reason, there can be no denying that Eastern Europe has provided remarkably fertile ground for the growth of some of the world's finest string quartets. And the Takacs Quartet, formed a quarter-century ago in Hungary at Budapest's Franz Liszt Academy where its founding members studied, has become one of the most renowned. The quartet, which will perform the music of Beethoven and Schubert on the Smith Theatre stage at 8 p.m. Saturday under the aegis of Columbia's Candlelight Concert Society, is based in Boulder, Colo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Born 200 years ago on Oct. 22, Franz Liszt changed music history. Even if the Hungarian-born pianist/composer had not done so, people would probably still remember him, if only for his romances. There was the dancer, Lola, who got so mad when Liszt tired of her that she followed him from city to city, finally crashing a banquet given in his honor and boogieing on a table in front of a startled crowd. And Olga, who, likewise faced with Liszt's waning affections, disguised herself as a gardener and burst into his villa ready to stab him. She settled for one more bout of lovemaking that night, but soon hounded him again, this time with a revolver and poison.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | November 2, 1995
It's hard to think of any pianist who loves the music of Franz Liszt more than Agi Rado. For her devotion to her great Hungarian countryman's music, she has been honored with the Bronze Award of the International Liszt Society and invited to give a recital in Budapest this spring as part of the society's annual conference.Ms. Rado will, of course, play Liszt Sunday afternoon at 3 in her recital at Har Sinai Congregation (6300 Park Heights Ave.), but she will also perform the music of Schumann, Mozart, Bartok and Baltimore composer Vivian Adelberg Rudow.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
McDaniel to present `Criminals in Love' McDaniel College theater students will present Criminals in Love, a play by George F. Walker, at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday in WMC Alumni Hall. Because of its adult language and story, the play is intended for mature audiences. The dark comedy tells the story of teen lovers Gail and Junior, and the problems they face because of Junior's family of felons. The play won the Chalmers Canadian Play Award in 1984 and the Governor General's Literary Award for Drama in 1985.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
The marketing of classical music has always been an uphill battle. Only a minuscule fraction of record, tape and CD buyers go into the stores looking for Beethoven instead of Beastie Boys. But what classical music lovers lack in numbers they more than make up in devotion.That's why getting a wider audience hooked on classics can add up to big bucks over time -- and why record companies, concert promoters and local musical organizations are always on the lookout for new ways to pique the interest of pop music listeners.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 14, 1997
The Walters Art Gallery will celebrate the reinstatement of Tuesday operation and free Saturday morning admission with a Winter Carnival for the whole family from 1: 30 p.m. to 4: 30 p.m. Dec. 30.The free carnival will include face painting, workshops and interactive tours. A performance by Kathleen Jacobs and Puppets will allow audience members to play the starring roles in "Creatures GREAT and small." After the show, children can create their own hand puppets and dragons and perform with them in theaters throughout the Renaissance Sculpture Court.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
McDaniel to present `Criminals in Love' McDaniel College theater students will present Criminals in Love, a play by George F. Walker, at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday in WMC Alumni Hall. Because of its adult language and story, the play is intended for mature audiences. The dark comedy tells the story of teen lovers Gail and Junior, and the problems they face because of Junior's family of felons. The play won the Chalmers Canadian Play Award in 1984 and the Governor General's Literary Award for Drama in 1985.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | May 8, 1995
Let me offer you a glimpse of what you will find Saturday at the "Bountiful Bazaar" sponsored by the Woman's Club of Linthicum Heights.Looking for something innovative? Then be sure to get to the bazaar early so you will have first choice from the "one of a kind" baskets. Each has been individually designed and filled with useful articles appropriate for gift giving.Hot off the press is the club's 300-recipe cookbook, "Sharing Our Best." For $10, you will receive recipes reflecting members' love of good cooking.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE | April 1, 1993
Severn School has successfully lured William J. Creeden from subtropical Florida to a state with more than its fair share of lousy weather to become its new headmaster.Mr. Creeden is to arrive in July after successful assignments in Miami; Bryan, Texas; and Hightstown, N.J.The new headmaster and his wife, Debbie, a math teacher, have three children.He will replace outgoing headmaster Edson "Shep" Sheppard.*Franz Liszt (alias Dr. Ted Brown) comes to Severna Park High School at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Born 200 years ago on Oct. 22, Franz Liszt changed music history. Even if the Hungarian-born pianist/composer had not done so, people would probably still remember him, if only for his romances. There was the dancer, Lola, who got so mad when Liszt tired of her that she followed him from city to city, finally crashing a banquet given in his honor and boogieing on a table in front of a startled crowd. And Olga, who, likewise faced with Liszt's waning affections, disguised herself as a gardener and burst into his villa ready to stab him. She settled for one more bout of lovemaking that night, but soon hounded him again, this time with a revolver and poison.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2002
Perhaps it's the echoes of all those gypsy violins wafting in the air. Whatever the reason, there can be no denying that Eastern Europe has provided remarkably fertile ground for the growth of some of the world's finest string quartets. And the Takacs Quartet, formed a quarter-century ago in Hungary at Budapest's Franz Liszt Academy where its founding members studied, has become one of the most renowned. The quartet, which will perform the music of Beethoven and Schubert on the Smith Theatre stage at 8 p.m. Saturday under the aegis of Columbia's Candlelight Concert Society, is based in Boulder, Colo.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 14, 1997
The Walters Art Gallery will celebrate the reinstatement of Tuesday operation and free Saturday morning admission with a Winter Carnival for the whole family from 1: 30 p.m. to 4: 30 p.m. Dec. 30.The free carnival will include face painting, workshops and interactive tours. A performance by Kathleen Jacobs and Puppets will allow audience members to play the starring roles in "Creatures GREAT and small." After the show, children can create their own hand puppets and dragons and perform with them in theaters throughout the Renaissance Sculpture Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | November 2, 1995
It's hard to think of any pianist who loves the music of Franz Liszt more than Agi Rado. For her devotion to her great Hungarian countryman's music, she has been honored with the Bronze Award of the International Liszt Society and invited to give a recital in Budapest this spring as part of the society's annual conference.Ms. Rado will, of course, play Liszt Sunday afternoon at 3 in her recital at Har Sinai Congregation (6300 Park Heights Ave.), but she will also perform the music of Schumann, Mozart, Bartok and Baltimore composer Vivian Adelberg Rudow.
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | May 8, 1995
Let me offer you a glimpse of what you will find Saturday at the "Bountiful Bazaar" sponsored by the Woman's Club of Linthicum Heights.Looking for something innovative? Then be sure to get to the bazaar early so you will have first choice from the "one of a kind" baskets. Each has been individually designed and filled with useful articles appropriate for gift giving.Hot off the press is the club's 300-recipe cookbook, "Sharing Our Best." For $10, you will receive recipes reflecting members' love of good cooking.
NEWS
January 5, 1995
The marketing of classical music has always been an uphill battle. Only a minuscule fraction of record, tape and CD buyers go into the stores looking for Beethoven instead of Beastie Boys. But what classical music lovers lack in numbers they more than make up in devotion.That's why getting a wider audience hooked on classics can add up to big bucks over time -- and why record companies, concert promoters and local musical organizations are always on the lookout for new ways to pique the interest of pop music listeners.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE | April 1, 1993
Severn School has successfully lured William J. Creeden from subtropical Florida to a state with more than its fair share of lousy weather to become its new headmaster.Mr. Creeden is to arrive in July after successful assignments in Miami; Bryan, Texas; and Hightstown, N.J.The new headmaster and his wife, Debbie, a math teacher, have three children.He will replace outgoing headmaster Edson "Shep" Sheppard.*Franz Liszt (alias Dr. Ted Brown) comes to Severna Park High School at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
April 13, 1995
Edward B. Crosland, 83, a former senior executive of AT&T Corp. who chaired the board of the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, died Tuesday of bone marrow failure and complications from anemia. As chairman of the Vienna, Va., foundation, he led supporters of the only U.S. national park for the performing arts.Annie Fischer, 80, one of Hungary's greatest pianists, died Monday in Budapest. A child prodigy, she won the first Franz Liszt piano competition in 1933 and played in major concert halls in Europe, the United States and Australia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 17, 1999
Like every other great composer, the life of Frederic Chopin has been travestied by Hollywood. But he's also the only composer who has escaped such treatment -- if only in a single movie. "Impromptu" (released in 1991 and available on video) brings Chopin and his circle of friends (including novelist George Sand, poet Alfred de Musset, painter Eugene Delacroix, pianist-composer Franz Liszt and the latter's ever-pregnant mistress, Marie d'Agoult) to uncanny life.Pulitzer Prize-winning stage director James Lapine ("Sunday in the Park with George")
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