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Franz Kline

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By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
WHEN GRACE HARTIGAN WAS A LITTLE girl, she was bewitched by gypsies. In the 1930s, the Travelers still roamed the countryside in nomadic caravans, and young Grace would shinny up the apple tree in her parents' backyard in Newark, N.J., to spy on them. She spent hours watching the women in colorful skirts and big hoop earrings telling fortunes, the men sharpening their knives. GRACE HARTIGAN: PORTRAITS FROM THE MASTERS, NEW PAINTINGS / / Exhibit runs through April 29 / / C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St. / / Admission is free / / Call 410-539-1080 or visit cgrimaldisgallery.
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NEWS
October 31, 1996
"Madame Soleil," 83, France's best-known astrologer, whose forecasts were broadcast nationwide for decades, died Sunday in Paris.Germaine Soleil reputedly advised President Francois Mitterrand and other public figures but never revealed her clientele. She began her career with a carnival stall and went on to launch a call-in astrology show in 1970. She became instantly famous.From 1970 to 1993, she gave forecasts on national radio. She retired from Europe 1 in 1993 but continued to give astrological forecasts over the Minitel, France's popular online service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 2, 2004
Inanna, Queen of Heaven and Earth, was the name given to history's first recorded goddess by the ancient Sumerians, a Babylonian people who lived some 4,000 years ago between what is today Baghdad and the Persian Gulf. Inanna possessed awesome powers as well as great wisdom, so it's no wonder painter Edna Emmet, whose lovely exhibition opens at Resurgam Gallery tonight, was inspired to create dozens of abstract-expressionist paintings inspired by this female deity's legend. Emmet, who teaches art at the Waldorf School and other area institutions, scrupulously avoids recognizable images in her paintings, which are full of saturated colors and sensual, abstract forms and whose passionate intensity approaches that with which the ancients must have worshipped their goddess.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | November 14, 2004
De Kooning: An American Master by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan. Alfred A. Knopf. 752 pages. $35. Willem de Kooning, one of the towering figures of 20th-century American art, arrived in New York aboard a British freighter in 1926 as a 22-year-old Dutch stowaway. He was fleeing a troubled childhood of poverty and neglect in his native city of Rotterdam. Over the following decades, he would transform himself from a penniless immigrant who barely spoke English into one of the country's most celebrated artists, achieving undreamed of success just as New York was becoming the cultural capital of the world.
NEWS
October 16, 1994
The official opening today of the Baltimore Museum of Arts New Wing for Modern Art represents a major milestone in this city's cultural life. The $10 million structure -- more than half of it contributed by the city and state, along with generous contributions by private and corporate donors -- was created to display the museum's collection of post-war painting and sculpture. The result is a stunning new space that will allow the museum to show off these modern masterpieces to greater advantage than ever before.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 17, 2008
Before she passed away Saturday after a long illness, Grace Hartigan was adamant, even imperious about the arrangements for how she would be memorialized. And she will get her way, as Hartigan, a seminal figure in the U.S. art world and a longtime Baltimore resident, usually did. "There will be no memorial service. She said that her memorial should be more about her body of work than about her physical body. She's always felt that way," says Rex Stevens, chairman of the drawing and general fine arts department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The 86-year-old painter will be cremated, he said.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1996
NEW YORK -- One of J. Boyer Bell's four daughters once asked him: "Daddy, can't you paint a cow, or a bird?"So he bought a small stuffed bird, glued it to the upper right hand corner of a large canvas, and painted it the color of a lark."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 2, 1994
Don't judge this book by its cover.The aluminum-clad exterior of the Baltimore Museum of Art's New Wing for Modern Art is controversial, to say the least. But inside this wing is a major success, a series of handsome spaces that open to one another imaginatively to produce vistas in which works of art communicate across galleries and across decades.The galleries are understated, respectful spaces that allow the art within to look its best. And the BMA's collection of art of the last half century looks immensely better than it did where formerly installed, in the museum's original building.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | August 31, 2006
It's the best part of summer, the long, lovely passage into fall. A procession of lazy, golden days that my sandy-haired, gap-toothed little girl has been painting, small abstract masterpieces in tempera and crayon and glitter, reminiscent of Franz Kline or Willem de Kooning (his early glitter period). She put a sign out front, "Art for Sale," and charged 25 cents per painting. Cheap at the price. A teacher gave her this freedom to sit un-self-consciously and put paint on paper. A gentle, 6-foot-8 guy named Matt who taught art at her preschool.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | April 5, 2006
Painter Grace Hartigan, whose latest works are on view this month at C. Grimaldis Gallery, traces her artistic roots back to the abstract-expressionist movement of the 1950s, when her contemporaries included such giants as Jackson Pollack, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Franz Kline and Philip Guston. But Hartigan, 84, has outlived all of them, as well as the heyday of America's first internationally important art movement, and chances are that she will be remembered as much for being a pioneer of all that followed as for her initial contributions as an Ab-Exer.
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