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By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | March 4, 2007
Moscow -- Nothing in politics happens by accident here, and so it is with the latest image circulating in the carefully choreographed world of Russian political affairs: that of Vladimir Delano Roosevelt. It's an unlikely parallel - that between President Vladimir V. Putin and America's FDR - but none other than the Russian president's chief ideologist was shopping it at a similarly unlikely conference in Moscow last month marking the 125th anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt's birth. The topic: "Lessons of the New Deal for Modern Russia and the World."
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NEWS
By Javier Miyares | June 22, 2014
Seventy years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill that transformed the economic and social structure of the United States and paved the way for the post-war boom. It was called the GI Bill of Rights. One of its many unintended byproducts was the way it revolutionized higher education. Just 16 days after D-Day, as American troops began the torturous battle to retake Hitler's Europe, President Roosevelt said in his signing statement that the bill "gives emphatic notice to the men and women in our armed forces that the American people do not intend to let them down.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2005
SANDY SPRING -- The time has come once more for Delmas P. Wood Jr., retired insurance man, to rise to greatness. Time to strap on the iron leg braces, don the gray suit and fedora, step to the microphone and call upon Congress to declare war on Japan. Or glide past cheering crowds in the blue 1936 Ford Phaeton convertible, exuding the confidence that might yet lift a despairing nation. It is spring, after all, when Wood returns from Florida to get back on the circuit of parades and historic commemorations in the persona of his political hero, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who died 60 years ago this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The music of Paul Hindemith gets little attention in our time. This despite the fact that the German-born composer, who spent many years in the U.S. after the rise of the Third Reich, once was widely recognized as an important and influential figure. All the more reason, then, to take note of this week's National Symphony Orchestra program, which offers an especially rare performance of "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," conducted by Christoph Eschenbach. Baritone Matthias Goerne, mezzo Michelle DeYoung and the Choral Arts Society of Washington will be featured.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,special to the sun | August 4, 1996
A photo on the front page of the Aug. 4 Perspective section was missing a credit. The photo of a Franklin Delano Roosevelt memorial should have been credited to Diane W. Blanks.The Sun regrets the error.The arguing continues on whether the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial park in Washington should contain a statue of FDR in a wheelchair. The National Organization on Disability and some other groups and individuals want one, contending that his disability was central to his life. The FDR Memorial Commission says "no," on the grounds that FDR went to great lengths to hide his polio-induced inability to stand or walk unaided and that desire should be honored.
NEWS
April 25, 1997
FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT was the greatest president of this century. His greatness lay in his ability to give the nation hope in the midst of crushing Depression and to lead it to victory in World War II. But what was the wellspring of his vitality, of his joy in political battle, of his ability to identify so closely with millions of Americans whose lives differed so completely from his?Was it his intelligence, his intuitive sense about where destiny was leading, his ability to articulate and manipulate?
NEWS
By Ronald Fraser | July 11, 1997
THE DEBATE over whether the new FDR Memorial in Washington should include Franklin Roosevelt in a wheelchair is an example of Madisonian interest group politics run amok, the trivial driving out the essential.FDR, a symbol of 20th century America at its best, belongs on Mount Rushmore, not in a wheelchair. To save the day we must, for the second time this century, turn to the Gutzon Borglum model of civic action.Mount Rushmore, unlike the static monuments typically raised in the nation's capital, is a work in progress, a running chronicle of the American experience.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is a columnist for The Sun | August 16, 1991
Washington. -- James Roosevelt, who died this week at 83, is there beside his father in a thousand photographs taken during World War II. He helped the disabled president both physically and politically by standing at his elbow in the uniform of a decorated Marine.For the rest of the son's life, help ran the other way. Jimmy got into movie production, radio commentary, politics and eventually some controversial business deals. His father's name opened every door, which is the norm for presidents' sons.
NEWS
By Linda L.S. Schulte | January 31, 1996
ANDY WARHOL was wrong. Everyone won't just have 15 minutes of fame. One day -- soon, I suspect -- we all will have our very own talk shows.What a proliferation of pundits and pontificators we have already. Even with Phil retiring, we've got Oprah, Geraldo, Sally Jessy, Jenny, Maury, Faith, Charley, Montel, Leeza . . . Leeza? Who are these people and what, aside from loose lips, gives them the talent to pose as talk-show hosts?Some became talk-show hosts because they failed at other slots, like, say, news anchor.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1996
We must be getting close to Halloween"Unsolved Mysteries" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Among tonight's subjects: High Priestess of Witchcraft Laurie Cabot, the official witch of Salem, Mass., who uses her abilities to help the local police department; and Sam Zelickson, a Holocaust survivor who won a $10 million lottery with a ticket bought at the urging of his dead son. NBC."It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- What would Halloween be without this tale of Linus and that monster vegetable that flies through the air, leaving presents for children lucky enough to tend the sincerest pumpkin patch?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Evelyn M. "Evvie" Spohn, whose career as a registered nurse caring for patients and their families spanned more than 70 years, died Wednesday of heart failure at Lorien Columbia Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She was 93. "Evvie was really my first experience in nursing homes, and I soon found out she was the consummate nurse," said Louis E. Grimmel Sr., CEO of Lorien Columbia Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, who hired Ms. Spohn in 1977. "She was caring and always had a positive attitude.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 7, 2013
"I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them. " - Thomas Jefferson My recent column on the challenges associated with the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program elicited numerous and very personal stories from readers about how individual (disabled) recipients depended on the program for daily maintenance. And, many asked, how dare I (and others of my ilk) question such a vital program?
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | March 4, 2007
Moscow -- Nothing in politics happens by accident here, and so it is with the latest image circulating in the carefully choreographed world of Russian political affairs: that of Vladimir Delano Roosevelt. It's an unlikely parallel - that between President Vladimir V. Putin and America's FDR - but none other than the Russian president's chief ideologist was shopping it at a similarly unlikely conference in Moscow last month marking the 125th anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt's birth. The topic: "Lessons of the New Deal for Modern Russia and the World."
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 18, 2006
One of the many bizarre recommendations in the recent report from the bipartisan Iraq Study Group is the call to talk with Iran. A formal dialogue with the Iranian leadership is, for a number of reasons, as misguided as it is amoral. In these frightening times, as we face aggressive dictatorships, our guides still should be Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt - not the British Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin and Joseph Kennedy, the U.S. ambassador to Britain, who, leading up to 1939, thought good could come out of talking with the Nazis.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2005
SANDY SPRING -- The time has come once more for Delmas P. Wood Jr., retired insurance man, to rise to greatness. Time to strap on the iron leg braces, don the gray suit and fedora, step to the microphone and call upon Congress to declare war on Japan. Or glide past cheering crowds in the blue 1936 Ford Phaeton convertible, exuding the confidence that might yet lift a despairing nation. It is spring, after all, when Wood returns from Florida to get back on the circuit of parades and historic commemorations in the persona of his political hero, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who died 60 years ago this month.
TOPIC
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 2004
The disclosure that Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has thrown into sharp focus a potent campaign issue - the powerful impact the next president is likely to have on an aging and narrowly divided Supreme Court. Rehnquist, the court's leading conservative figure for a generation, is expected to be back at work tomorrow morning after being hospitalized and undergoing surgery a week ago. But his return to the bench will be heavily weighted with questions about his prognosis and what it could mean for the future of the high court.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | January 11, 1996
PARIS -- In physical and political presence, an American is reminded most of Franklin Roosevelt when considering France's former President Francois Mitterrand, who died Monday.The face, the profile, the conscious style that imposed itself even from Roosevelt's wheelchair, the consummate subtlety in political practice, the total pragmatism and lack of ideology -- the lack of principle, their enemies said! -- and finally, and above all, their ambition and perseverance, were parallel qualities.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 25, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- It seems to be time once again for academia to rate the presidents, a phenomenon that occurs every decade or so.Like a hatch of 17-year locusts, historians and political scientists are suddenly emerging, each with a new and authoritative assessment of presidential performance.Much as his father did in 1948, Professor Arthur Schlesinger Jr. assembled a collection of 32 eminences some months ago to pronounce their version of the verdict of history.Most were historians or political scientists, including such durable stars as James MacGregor Burns and Doris Kearns Goodwin, but there was a politician or two in the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | March 21, 2004
Eighty years ago, H.L Mencken observed, "The chief business of the nation, as a nation, is the setting up of heroes, mainly bogus." It may offer some solace, after the turmoil and upheavals of the 20th century, to reflect how little has changed. Last month's presidential candidate was marching infallibly to the nomination; this month he is a has-been. Last week's stock guru / diet guru / therapy guru turns out to be this week's charlatan. The ink hardly dries on the cover photo of the celebrity wedding before the issue with the celebrity divorce reaches the stands.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | January 8, 2002
OVER THE weekend at the city's brand-new comedy club, The Improv, standup comic Lewis Black made a joke about George W. Bush. It wasn't a very good joke, but maybe it was an important one just because somebody dared to make it. Before Sept. 11, Black said, the president was "an idiot." After Sept. 11, "a genius." Then Black went into some of the schtick he performs to motorize his material. He shook his jowls. He rolled his eyes. He went into an entire orchestration of exasperations to show he was kidding and that Bush was, is and always would be the man he was before the day of terrorist attacks.
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