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Franklin Delano Roosevelt

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By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 3, 1997
Washington -- For many who ambled along the granite plazas, by the waterfalls and azaleas, among the statuary depicting the story of a generation, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a dear old friend. More than 52 years after his death, these visitors came to remember the strength and courage of a president and the vigor of a bygone era.On a glorious spring day, a pastoral memorial honoring FDR's presidency and his times opened yesterday in the shade of the Cherry Tree Walk by the Tidal Basin.
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NEWS
By Rick Perlstein and Rick Perlstein,Chicago Tribune | September 9, 2007
FDR By Jean Edward Smith Random House / 858 pages / $35 Franklin Delano Roosevelt's beloved mother died in 1941. Her casket was carried to the grave by her most loyal servants, including a butler and chauffeur. The Secret Service was there, too, of course, but it hung far back from the ceremony. "I don't think we belong in there," said the president's personal bodyguard, Mike Reilly, "even if Congress says we do." He was referring to the intimacy of the moment. But you can also hear, in his nervousness, overtones of class.
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NEWS
August 11, 1996
A photo on the front page of the Aug. 4 Perspective section was missing a credit. The photo of a Franklin Delano Roosevelt memorial should have been credited to Diane W. Blanks.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/11/96
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 17, 2005
While television is often blamed for everything from shortened attention spans to college students who cannot name a president before Ronald Reagan, two productions this month about Franklin Delano Roosevelt suggest that television also can illuminate history through evocative storytelling. FDR: A Presidency Revealed, a four-hour special starting tonight on the History Channel, and Warm Springs, an inspirational HBO film starring Kenneth Branagh about Roosevelt's struggle with polio, not only remember the 32nd president of the United States, but also bring his indomitable spirit back to life.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
Betsey Cushing Roosevelt Whitney,89, the widow of John Hay "Jock" Whitney and the first wife of James Roosevelt, died Wednesday in Manhasset, N.Y. She was the second-born of the three Cushing sisters of Boston, who were renowned in the 1930s and '40s for their marriages into some of the most prominent families in the country.She inherited the bulk of one of the great American fortunes when Jock Whitney -- sportsman, financier, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune, philanthropist and ambassador to Britain -- died in 1982.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | August 20, 1991
BY 7 O'CLOCK on Saturday night, April 14, 1945, thousands of men, women and children were lined up, wherever they could find a perch, along the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks through Baltimore. They were waiting solemnly, some tearfully, to view the coffin of Franklin D. Roosevelt as his funeral train passed through the city on its way from Warm Springs, Ga., to Hyde Park, N.Y., where he would be buried. It was raining.The president had died April 12. Most Americans heard the news first over the radio at about 5:45 p.m. "Eastern War Time."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 1990
Elliott Roosevelt, World War II Air Forces general, breeder of Arabian horses and an author whose works included a series of mystery novels that cast his mother, first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, as an amateur detective, died Saturday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 80.The second child of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, he began his writing career in 1946 with "As He Saw It," a best-selling account of his experiences at his father's side during five historic wartime summit conferences.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 11, 1994
"FDR" is sublime.The 4 1/2 -hour biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, which begins at 9 tonight on PBS, could be the best nonfiction, or dTC "reality," program you will see all year.It's that good.It does much that is daring, and even more that is revealing and touching. Best of all, it never sentimentalizes its subject.For starters, it tackles without apology the great lie of the Roosevelt presidency -- that the president was not really paralyzed or physically helpless.In fact, he was. With no hip muscles, Roosevelt could have been blown over by a sudden breeze, says host David McCullough.
FEATURES
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
The woman in the baggy linen suit has some stories she tells and others no one will ever hear. At some point she destroyed what might have been evidence, and let historical mystery linger like the aroma of burnt love letters. Lorena Hickok, dead 32 years, will step onto a stage in Fells Point tomorrow evening and tell how she came to befriend and love Eleanor Roosevelt. She'll say just so much and no more, leaving the question open: What really went on between her and the woman who was once the most powerful in America?
NEWS
By LOUIS L. GOLDSTEIN | January 20, 1993
Annapolis. -- To a 16-year-old country boy in brown corduroy knee pants, that day with the parade, the crowds and the big-city atmosphere was the most exciting since our family got its first Atwater-Kent radio.I was one of a school bus full of Calvert County boys and girls making my first visit to our nation's capital, and I didn't waste any time staking out the lamp post on the southeast corner of 15th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue as the best place to watch the action.It was March 4, 1929, and Herbert Hoover was being sworn in as America's 31st president by Chief Justice (and former President)
NEWS
By Cass R. Sunstein | August 6, 2004
IN THE LAST few weeks, the nation has devoted a great deal of attention to the "greatest generation" and its successful fight against fascism. But something important is missing from the celebration: the distinctive vision of the leader of that generation, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and his effort to connect the idea of security with protection against human vulnerability in all its forms. In his eloquent remarks inaugurating the World War II memorial in Washington, President Bush insisted, "Across the years, we still know his voice."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
National television cameras catch Peter Marudas, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes' chief of staff, and Allan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve, head to head in deep confab at a Senate banking committee hearing about a year ago. Marudas immediately starts getting calls: What did he tell you? A hiccup from Greenspan can jump-start the stock market, up or down. Marudas laughs. He likes telling this story. He and Greenspan were talking about jazz. As a young man, Greenspan played clarinet, flute and a little sax in New York jazz bands, including one led by Leonard Garment, who became President Nixon's White House counsel.
FEATURES
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
The woman in the baggy linen suit has some stories she tells and others no one will ever hear. At some point she destroyed what might have been evidence, and let historical mystery linger like the aroma of burnt love letters. Lorena Hickok, dead 32 years, will step onto a stage in Fells Point tomorrow evening and tell how she came to befriend and love Eleanor Roosevelt. She'll say just so much and no more, leaving the question open: What really went on between her and the woman who was once the most powerful in America?
NEWS
By Howard Kleinberg | April 12, 1998
I CANNOT let this date pass without recalling Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who died on April 12, 1945. It is made doubly memorable this year because nine presidential historians, rating the 17 presidents of the 20th century for the April 13 issue of Time magazine, chose Franklin Roosevelt as the best.It didn't surprise me; likely, it enraged others.Roosevelt was one of those men you either adored or hated. Fortunately for the United States, far more adored him than hated him. He was elected four times, so often that Congress, soon after his death, passed a law restricting presidential terms.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
Betsey Cushing Roosevelt Whitney,89, the widow of John Hay "Jock" Whitney and the first wife of James Roosevelt, died Wednesday in Manhasset, N.Y. She was the second-born of the three Cushing sisters of Boston, who were renowned in the 1930s and '40s for their marriages into some of the most prominent families in the country.She inherited the bulk of one of the great American fortunes when Jock Whitney -- sportsman, financier, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune, philanthropist and ambassador to Britain -- died in 1982.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | May 4, 1997
SAG HARBOR, N.Y. -- My friend Jay Severin writes a column for the local weekly, the Sag Harbor Express. He is a political consultant, working for Republicans, so as you might expect, he makes a good living and is expert at sticking it to government and all its works.Last week, writing about a dispute involving a local golf course, he wrote: ''How dare the state use our own money to stick its corrupt, ignoble nose into our local affairs?'' With dark talk of revolution and growling about paying more than half his income in taxes, he dropped in this parenthetical line: ''(Quick: Name anything government improves.
NEWS
By Rick Perlstein and Rick Perlstein,Chicago Tribune | September 9, 2007
FDR By Jean Edward Smith Random House / 858 pages / $35 Franklin Delano Roosevelt's beloved mother died in 1941. Her casket was carried to the grave by her most loyal servants, including a butler and chauffeur. The Secret Service was there, too, of course, but it hung far back from the ceremony. "I don't think we belong in there," said the president's personal bodyguard, Mike Reilly, "even if Congress says we do." He was referring to the intimacy of the moment. But you can also hear, in his nervousness, overtones of class.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1997
Richard Lidinsky, a quiet man whose rectitude and judgment graced a couple of generations of Baltimore politics, sighs a small requiem for Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "I should pray for him every time I get my Social Security check."The plain people who lived through the Great Depression of the 1930s and then World War II never needed a monument like the $48 million, 7.5-acre shrine unveiled yesterday in Washington for the man they elected their president four times. Their memorials are everywhere: in the retirement checks they receive in the mail, in the dimes they carry in their pockets, in the houses in which they live, in the parks they enjoy and, most of all, in their hearts.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1997
Richard Lidinsky, a quiet man whose rectitude and judgment graced a couple of generations of Baltimore politics, sighs a small requiem for Franklin Delano Roosevelt: "I should pray for him every time I get my Social Security check."The plain people who lived through the Great Depression of the 1930s and then World War II never needed a monument like the $48 million, 7.5-acre shrine unveiled yesterday in Washington for the man they elected their president four times. Their memorials are everywhere: in the retirement checks they receive in the mail, in the dimes they carry in their pockets, in the houses in which they live, in the parks they enjoy and, most of all, in their hearts.
FEATURES
By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 3, 1997
Washington -- For many who ambled along the granite plazas, by the waterfalls and azaleas, among the statuary depicting the story of a generation, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a dear old friend. More than 52 years after his death, these visitors came to remember the strength and courage of a president and the vigor of a bygone era.On a glorious spring day, a pastoral memorial honoring FDR's presidency and his times opened yesterday in the shade of the Cherry Tree Walk by the Tidal Basin.
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