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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The first time he was asked to consider working on a musical about the 1960s pop/rock sensation Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Marshall Brickman declined. "I still wake up screaming sometimes, thinking how my life would have been different had I stuck with saying no," he said by phone from his New York home. That initial reluctance could have derailed the project that turned into "Jersey Boys," the multiple Tony Award-winning, international monster hit that landed this week at the Hippodrome . The Bronx-born Brickman, former head writer of "The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson" and co-screenwriter of such Woody Allen classics as "Annie Hall," had a good excuse when actor/writer/creative consultant Rick Elice suggested a Four Seasons show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
"Jersey Boys," the durable jukebox musical about the Four Seasons, has worked its way back to Baltimore, hanging on to what it's got - a whole bunch of popular songs interspersed with tales of triumph, tribulation and more triumph. For those who caught the show's visit to the Hippodrome Theatre only two years ago, there is a new cast to check out. For those who have managed to miss it (in addition to the national touring production, it has been on Broadway since 2005), this visit will make a worthy introduction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Tomorrow, Peggy Santiglia Davison will drive to Washington and, not for the first time, watch a lithe young actress in the production of "The Jersey Boys" pretending to be her. Chances are, it will be a joyful experience, though not an entirely comfortable one. Davison, now 65 and a resident of Carroll County, was one of the Angels, the three-member girl group that enjoyed stratospheric popularity for a few years in the early 1960s. The Angels toured the world. They performed on "The Ed Sullivan Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Frankie Valli made it seem so easy, spinning out those distinctive falsetto notes in hit songs as lead singer for the Four Seasons, starting 51 years ago with "Sherry. " But what came naturally to Valli takes honing for the guys who have to approximate his vocal cords in the hit bio-musical "Jersey Boys. " The success of the show, which returns to Baltimore next week, depends to a large extent on filling that central role persuasively. "The score is so difficult," says Katie Agresta, the seasoned New York-based vocal coach who has worked with the likes of Jon Bon Jovi and Cyndi Lauper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Picture it: Club Venus, Perring Plaza. One night in 1967, booking agent Bill Bateman brought in Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Responsible for making sure the crowd hears the music at the best possible level is the house soundman, Bob Goldstein. The familiar strains of "Sherry," "Rag Doll" and "Walk Like a Man" filled the place so effectively that night it changed Goldstein's life. Clair Brothers, the sound company from Pennsylvania that started in 1966 with a Four Seasons gig in Lancaster, offered Goldstein a job. "I dropped out of college and went on the road with the group in 1967," Goldstein said.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | October 6, 2009
In the crowded field of great American pop acts from the 1960s and '70s, Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons may not rank at the top in profound artistic quality, but certainly in high notes and - as it turns out - in back story. "Jersey Boys," the Tony Award-winning musical that has settled into the National Theatre for a 10-week run, tells that tale with a disarming energy, and a whole lot of songs. Although there are moments when you may expect an announcer to stop the action and solicit donations to your local PBS station, this isn't just a nostalgia feast engineered to unleash fuzzy feelings in people of a certain age. Written by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, the affectionate, but unsentimental, show effectively mingles enough biography to produce genuine and interesting characters onstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Frankie Valli made it seem so easy, spinning out those distinctive falsetto notes in hit songs as lead singer for the Four Seasons, starting 51 years ago with "Sherry. " But what came naturally to Valli takes honing for the guys who have to approximate his vocal cords in the hit bio-musical "Jersey Boys. " The success of the show, which returns to Baltimore next week, depends to a large extent on filling that central role persuasively. "The score is so difficult," says Katie Agresta, the seasoned New York-based vocal coach who has worked with the likes of Jon Bon Jovi and Cyndi Lauper.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Ocean City Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival The 27th annual Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival brings together artists, including painters, carvers, sculptors and model ship builders, to showcase their work. The festival takes places alongside the North American Craft Show at the Ocean City Convention Center on 40th Street. The festival is Jan. 14, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Jan. 15, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for students ages 13-17 and free for children age 12 and younger with a paying adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
"Jersey Boys," the durable jukebox musical about the Four Seasons, has worked its way back to Baltimore, hanging on to what it's got - a whole bunch of popular songs interspersed with tales of triumph, tribulation and more triumph. For those who caught the show's visit to the Hippodrome Theatre only two years ago, there is a new cast to check out. For those who have managed to miss it (in addition to the national touring production, it has been on Broadway since 2005), this visit will make a worthy introduction.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 22, 1997
I hold up the possibility that, somewhere in the ravines of his subconscious, D. Vogel once had this conversation with himself: "I've worked in the movie theater business, and I've worked in the automobile business. Now I think I'll buy a drive-in movie business."But that's not it. You need something more than a simple career orientation to get into the drive-in business these days. Passion helps. A sense of family tradition will get you there, too. D. Vogel says he took on Bengies in 1988 because of his roots.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2012
Ocean City Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival The 27th annual Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival brings together artists, including painters, carvers, sculptors and model ship builders, to showcase their work. The festival takes places alongside the North American Craft Show at the Ocean City Convention Center on 40th Street. The festival is Jan. 14, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Jan. 15, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for students ages 13-17 and free for children age 12 and younger with a paying adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
Just before the final number in "Jersey Boys," the character of Frankie Valli recalls the old days with his buddies and "the first time we made that sound — our sound. " By this point in the hit musical about the Four Seasons, a lot has happened to the pop group's original members. But Valli holds on to the intense memory of those first days when the music was all that mattered. "That was the best," he says. "That's why I'm still going out there singing — like that bunny on TV with the battery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Picture it: Club Venus, Perring Plaza. One night in 1967, booking agent Bill Bateman brought in Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Responsible for making sure the crowd hears the music at the best possible level is the house soundman, Bob Goldstein. The familiar strains of "Sherry," "Rag Doll" and "Walk Like a Man" filled the place so effectively that night it changed Goldstein's life. Clair Brothers, the sound company from Pennsylvania that started in 1966 with a Four Seasons gig in Lancaster, offered Goldstein a job. "I dropped out of college and went on the road with the group in 1967," Goldstein said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The first time he was asked to consider working on a musical about the 1960s pop/rock sensation Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Marshall Brickman declined. "I still wake up screaming sometimes, thinking how my life would have been different had I stuck with saying no," he said by phone from his New York home. That initial reluctance could have derailed the project that turned into "Jersey Boys," the multiple Tony Award-winning, international monster hit that landed this week at the Hippodrome . The Bronx-born Brickman, former head writer of "The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson" and co-screenwriter of such Woody Allen classics as "Annie Hall," had a good excuse when actor/writer/creative consultant Rick Elice suggested a Four Seasons show.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | October 6, 2009
In the crowded field of great American pop acts from the 1960s and '70s, Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons may not rank at the top in profound artistic quality, but certainly in high notes and - as it turns out - in back story. "Jersey Boys," the Tony Award-winning musical that has settled into the National Theatre for a 10-week run, tells that tale with a disarming energy, and a whole lot of songs. Although there are moments when you may expect an announcer to stop the action and solicit donations to your local PBS station, this isn't just a nostalgia feast engineered to unleash fuzzy feelings in people of a certain age. Written by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, the affectionate, but unsentimental, show effectively mingles enough biography to produce genuine and interesting characters onstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Tomorrow, Peggy Santiglia Davison will drive to Washington and, not for the first time, watch a lithe young actress in the production of "The Jersey Boys" pretending to be her. Chances are, it will be a joyful experience, though not an entirely comfortable one. Davison, now 65 and a resident of Carroll County, was one of the Angels, the three-member girl group that enjoyed stratospheric popularity for a few years in the early 1960s. The Angels toured the world. They performed on "The Ed Sullivan Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
Just before the final number in "Jersey Boys," the character of Frankie Valli recalls the old days with his buddies and "the first time we made that sound — our sound. " By this point in the hit musical about the Four Seasons, a lot has happened to the pop group's original members. But Valli holds on to the intense memory of those first days when the music was all that mattered. "That was the best," he says. "That's why I'm still going out there singing — like that bunny on TV with the battery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | December 16, 2004
An update on the concert scene: newly announced shows and ticket availability. For ticket information and purchase, call Ticketmaster at 410-547-SEAT unless otherwise noted. Just announced The Eagles will perform at 1st Mariner Arena on April 5. Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons play the Warner Theatre in Washington on Feb. 18. The Carmina Burana Monumental Opera performs at MCI Center in Washington on March 3. Still available Can't Hang at the Funk Box on Dec. 23. The Roots at the 9:30 Club on Dec. 26. 800-955-5566.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 22, 1997
I hold up the possibility that, somewhere in the ravines of his subconscious, D. Vogel once had this conversation with himself: "I've worked in the movie theater business, and I've worked in the automobile business. Now I think I'll buy a drive-in movie business."But that's not it. You need something more than a simple career orientation to get into the drive-in business these days. Passion helps. A sense of family tradition will get you there, too. D. Vogel says he took on Bengies in 1988 because of his roots.
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