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By Steve Jones | October 31, 2012
Nigel Goldsborough is a normally a mild-mannered freshman at Loyola Blakefield High School. But something strange happened to Goldsborough this month, and it's a good thing that his change in attitude is only temporary. When the Loyola Blakefield Players decided to present "Frankenstein" for its fall production, Goldsborough became "The Creature. " He's the only actor who can walk off the stage and not be recognized by the audience after the curtain comes down. "It was really challenging," said Goldsborough, of Roland Park.
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NEWS
October 31, 2012
The talents of students from three local schools will be on stage beginning this evening, Friday, Oct. 26, when the Loyola Blakefield Players present its fall drama, "Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus," the classic tale of horror about a scientist who re-animates a corpse. The story was originally published in 1818, and has had numerous screen and stage re-creations. It was was modified for the stage by Victor Gialanella from the novel by Mary Shelley. The Loyola Blakefield production stars senior Tim Neil as scientist Victor Frankenstein, and freshman Nigel Goldsborough as The Creature.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 24, 1995
If you could live forever, what would you do with your life?"You'd have time to do everything you want to and get good at it," suggested Shana Burdick, a 21-year-old Western Maryland College senior and theater and communications major.Eternal life is the basis for "Dr. Frankenstein's Dracula," an original workshop play that will be performed today, tomorrow and March 2-4 in Dorothy Elderdice Theatre in WMC's Alumni Hall.The play, produced by Ira Domser, the college's director of theater, combines elements of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" and Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
Mel Brooks is singing into the telephone. "He vas a bully und a brute, he vas as crazy as a coot," the comic half-growls, impersonating an elderly Transylvanian housekeeper. "Still, I didn't give a hoot - he vas my boyfriend." The fabled filmmaker/Broadway producer is 83 and still has most of his factory-issued parts, so it's not surprising that the pipes occasionally show a speck or two of rust. Besides, Brooks was giving this impromptu concert strictly for educational purposes, to illustrate a point about the musical stage version of "Young Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Olney Theatre Center's fifth annual Potomac Theatre Festival opens Wednesday with Neal Bell's Monster, adapted from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Updating some of the language, but not the 19th century setting, Bell's play focuses on the issue of personal accountability. An Obie Award winner and playwright-in-residence at the Yale School of Drama, Bell also scripted the adaptation of Emile Zola's Therese Raquin that was produced at Olney three summers ago. Monster stars Christopher Lane as the title character, Jeffries Thaiss as Victor Frankenstein and Valerie Leonard in the dual roles of Frankenstein's mother and a servant.
NEWS
August 18, 1997
A story in Saturday's editions of The Sun about the publisher of books about horror films incorrectly identified the actor who plays Frankenstein in the 1931 movie by the same name. Boris Karloff plays Dr. Frankenstein, and Colin Clive plays the monster.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/18/97
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | October 20, 2006
The late Howard E. Rollins Jr., a Baltimore-born actor nominated for an Oscar for 1981's Ragtime, will be honored starting at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road. "An Evening With Howard" will include remarks from John Waters and a film on Rollins directed by Steve Yeager, an instructor at Towson University who cast Rollins in his 1990 film, On The Block. The evening, hosted by Kweisi Mfume, will close with the unveiling of a wax figure of Rollins to be installed at Baltimore's Great Blacks In Wax Museum.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 22, 2008
In movies like The Bank Job, Jason Statham has shown the potential to be a British Steve McQueen, but he'll never get the chance if he keeps making gobblers like Death Race. It's strictly a smash-and-grab variation on the campy 1975 cult hit Death Race 2000, this time setting a souped-up destruction-derby auto race, played to the death, on the grounds of Terminal Island, a prison for extreme violent offenders. "This had action right from the beginning," I heard one satisfied viewer say on the way out. Actually, most of the time it only has an illusion of action.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2005
COMING UP Stags and Hens, a comedy about the festivities surrounding an engaged couple's last night as bachelor and bachelorette, opens a two-week run at the Theatre Project tonight. The play is an early work by Willy Russell, whose subsequent credits include Educating Rita, Shirley Valentine and Blood Brothers. Produced by Britain's Songtime Theatre Arts company, the production features a cast of 10 directed by John Payton. Show times at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., are 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturdays, and 7 p.m. Sundays, through Sept.
NEWS
By CHARLES MATTHEWS and CHARLES MATTHEWS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2006
The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler Little, Brown / 336 pages / $24.95 The sleep of reason brings forth monsters," proclaimed one of Goya's best-known etchings, created when Europe, having dozed off at the end of its Age of Reason, was awakening to some real monsters: the Reign of Terror and the Napoleonic wars. And there were fictional ones too: the horrors of the Gothic novel, and the most famous Gothic of them all, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
With a heavy tread, "Young Frankenstein" - excuse me, "The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein," to use the official title - landed at the Hippodrome on Tuesday night, almost fiendishly eager to entertain. Those who have a high tolerance for obvious sight and verbal gags, frat boy-level vulgarity and compose-by-number songs will most fully embrace this stop on the Broadway show's first national tour. Those who might like the occasional dollop of substance could get squirmy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009
SATURDAY TRICKS AND TREATS AT THE CHARLES: The Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St., offers up a sweet cinematic treat for Halloween. "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein" is a horror spoof starring Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Lon Chaney Jr. and Bela Lugosi. For this special noon children's matinee, children are admitted free. Adult admission is $6. Go to thecharles.com. MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER MINI-MARATHON: B-movie fans can crack wise along with MST3K's Tom Servo, Crow and Gypsy when the Carroll County Arts Council, 91 W. Main St., screens "Santa Claus Conquers the Martians," "Teenagers from Outer Space" and "Manos: The Hands of Fate."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 22, 2008
In movies like The Bank Job, Jason Statham has shown the potential to be a British Steve McQueen, but he'll never get the chance if he keeps making gobblers like Death Race. It's strictly a smash-and-grab variation on the campy 1975 cult hit Death Race 2000, this time setting a souped-up destruction-derby auto race, played to the death, on the grounds of Terminal Island, a prison for extreme violent offenders. "This had action right from the beginning," I heard one satisfied viewer say on the way out. Actually, most of the time it only has an illusion of action.
NEWS
November 4, 2007
The central library, 10375 Little Patuxent Parkway, is showing "Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature," an exhibit about Mary Shelley's 19th-century monster, Frankenstein pop culture and the ethics of scientific and medical practices. The traveling exhibition, on loan from The National Library of Medicine, includes artwork, photographs, toys, comic books and movie posters. It will be at the library through Nov. 17. Information: 410-313-7800. Wilde Lake High to present `Peter Pan' Wilde Lake High School Theatre Arts presents Peter Pan, a high-flying adventure, at 7 p.m. Nov. 15, 16 and 17. Tickets, available from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday at Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School, are $10 in advance; $12 at the door.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | October 31, 2006
One of the scariest moments in the horror movie genre is when the baby-sitter gets the telephone call telling her, "He's in the house with you!" The "he," of course, is the bad guy/murderer/monster. The week leading up to today's celebration of Halloween has given us lots of spine chillers to entertain us. One of the classic scary bad-guy stories is Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley. A best-seller in 1816 and rarely out of print since, Frankenstein is probably the most beautifully written of all scary books.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | October 20, 2006
The late Howard E. Rollins Jr., a Baltimore-born actor nominated for an Oscar for 1981's Ragtime, will be honored starting at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road. "An Evening With Howard" will include remarks from John Waters and a film on Rollins directed by Steve Yeager, an instructor at Towson University who cast Rollins in his 1990 film, On The Block. The evening, hosted by Kweisi Mfume, will close with the unveiling of a wax figure of Rollins to be installed at Baltimore's Great Blacks In Wax Museum.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions about the publisher of books on horror films incorrectly identified the role played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie, "Frankenstein," and a correction that appeared yesterday also erred in stating actors' roles in the film.In fact, Colin Clive portrayed Dr. Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff had the role of Frankenstein's monster.The Sun regrets the errors.A story in Saturday's editions of The Sun about the publisher of books about horror films incorrectly identified the actor who plays Frankenstein in the 1931 movie by the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 30, 2005
In one year in the midst of the Great Depression, Dracula, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde and a troupe of vengeful sideshow freaks invaded Hollywood. In four films, released from February 1931 to February 1932, the American horror film was invented, refined and - some would argue - nearly perfected. In that morbid 12-month period, Universal Studios would set the gold standard of Hollywood horror with the release of both Dracula and Frankenstein, while Paramount countered with Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and MGM took an uncharacteristic journey down the path of depravity with Freaks, in which the denizens of a carnival sideshow enact vengeance on those who consider them less-than-human.
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