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By Los Angeles Times | September 20, 1990
HOLLYWOOD Sharon Stone and Valeria Golino join Andrew McCarthy in John Frankenheimer's political thriller, "The Year of the Gun," which will shoot in Rome this October. The Edward R. Pressman production concerns the paranoia that took place in Italy during the Red Brigade's 1978 reign of terror. David Ambroise wrote the screenplay from a Michael Mewshaw novel.Eric Roberts will star in Shooter Productions' "Midnight Sun" (aka "Burning Bridges"), a murder mystery about a New Yorker caught up in a fast Hollywood crowd.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 27, 2003
George Axelrod, the screenwriter and sometime director who died Saturday at age 81, had his name on the scripts of several icon-generating movies, including The Seven Year Itch (1955), Bus Stop (1956), and Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). He also produced, directed and wrote the disreputable crazy-comedy classic Lord Love a Duck (1966). But his main claim to posterity is the subversive political suspense film The Manchurian Candidate (1962). It's one of the few "trick" movies that builds in entertainment value even after its tricks are revealed - and even after repeated viewings.
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By Lou Cedrone | October 31, 1991
Director John Frankenheimer says he has about eight more films left in him. ''More, if I'm lucky,'' he said. ''I'm 62, and I want to make sure they count. After 'Dead Bang' and 'The Fourth War,' I want to make a commercially successful film.''His newest movie is ''Year of the Gun,'' and it opens here tomorrow. It is an action melodrama that takes place in Italy, in 1978, when the Red Brigades were terrorizing the country.''Producer Ed Pressman came to me,'' he said. ''He wanted to work with me and asked me to read the book on which the film is based.
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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 14, 2002
American filmmaking has lost two pioneers of its iconoclastic postwar sensibility -- that adult brand of social rebellion, emotional experimentation and aesthetic adventure that ruffled the surface of the Eisenhower years and peaked before the counterculture. Director John Frankenheimer, 72, died of a stroke after spinal surgery on July 6; actor Rod Steiger, 77, died of pneumonia and kidney failure on Tuesday. In the era of live television, they burst into a cathode-ray version of the limelight -- Steiger with his offbeat starring role as the lovelorn butcher in Paddy Chayefsky's Marty (1953)
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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 14, 2002
American filmmaking has lost two pioneers of its iconoclastic postwar sensibility -- that adult brand of social rebellion, emotional experimentation and aesthetic adventure that ruffled the surface of the Eisenhower years and peaked before the counterculture. Director John Frankenheimer, 72, died of a stroke after spinal surgery on July 6; actor Rod Steiger, 77, died of pneumonia and kidney failure on Tuesday. In the era of live television, they burst into a cathode-ray version of the limelight -- Steiger with his offbeat starring role as the lovelorn butcher in Paddy Chayefsky's Marty (1953)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | February 20, 2000
WASHINGTON -- John Frankenheimer is a Class-A director with a 40-plus-year career, four Emmys and a handful of classic motion pictures on his resume. But there was a time when he had lost his confidence. "The phone wasn't ringing, I was begging off on a lot of stuff," the 70-year-old Frankenheimer says, reflecting on a slack period that began in the late '80s and stretched into the early '90s. "I thought that they had written me off." Events would prove, however, that Frankenheimer had -- and doubtless has -- plenty of directing left in him. This week, his latest, "Reindeer Games," opens in theaters throughout the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 1, 1991
For many years, John ("Manchurian Candidate") Frankenheimer has been laboring to remove the parenthesis from the middle of his name. Such is the fate of a man who makes his masterpiece too soon as both he and Orson ("Citizen Kane") Welles found out.It is therefore sad to report that he will probably never become known as John ("Year of the Gun") Frankenheimer. His new thriller, set in the year of the Red Brigades horror in Rome (1978), is chaotic and rambunctious but consistently undone by bad actors reading bad dialogue badly amid the explosions and the riots.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even before its public release, a new Hollywood-made docudrama about former Alabama Gov. George Wallace has generated a mini-controversy about the liberties its maker has taken with the facts.In "George Wallace," by veteran director-producer JohnFrankenheimer, a black convicted murderer named Archie who has become a prison trustee working for Mr. Wallace at the mansion takes an ice pick from a kitchen drawer and contemplates stabbing him, but in the end decides against it.The incident never happened and Frankenheimer acknowledges it. He defends the scene as a dramatic device to convey the anger of black Alabamans toward Mr. Wallace, who at the time was a leader of the cause of racial segregation in the Deep South.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 23, 1997
TNT's "George Wallace" is one of the most eloquent, lyrical and moving docudramas ever made for television.It is also one of the most troubling. I can't remember a docudrama in the last decade -- and there have been some hot-hot-button ones, such as NBC's "Roe Vs. Wade" -- in which the mix of fact and fiction has left me feeling so uneasy."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 23, 2001
"Into the Arms of Strangers," an Oscar-nominated documentary on British efforts to rescue German and other children targeted by the Third Reich, is this weekend's Cinema Sundays offering. Director Mark Jonathan Harris' film looks at the Kindertransport, a rescue effort that saved more than 10,000 children from the Nazi concentration camps. Transported to Britain, the children were placed in foster homes or hostels, with the idea that they would be reunited with their families at war's end. For most, the war ended with no family left to return to. One of those children was the mother of "Into the Arms of Strangers" producer Deborah Oppenheimer.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2002
LOS ANGELES - John Frankenheimer, one of the foremost directors of the 1960s with classic films such as The Manchurian Candidate, Seven Days in May, Birdman of Alcatraz and The Train, died of a massive stroke yesterday from complications after spinal surgery. He was 72. Mr. Frankenheimer, whose career stumbled badly in the late 1970s and 1980s because of personal problems and alcoholism, returned in the 1990s with significant television work that was flourishing at the time of his death.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 23, 2001
"Into the Arms of Strangers," an Oscar-nominated documentary on British efforts to rescue German and other children targeted by the Third Reich, is this weekend's Cinema Sundays offering. Director Mark Jonathan Harris' film looks at the Kindertransport, a rescue effort that saved more than 10,000 children from the Nazi concentration camps. Transported to Britain, the children were placed in foster homes or hostels, with the idea that they would be reunited with their families at war's end. For most, the war ended with no family left to return to. One of those children was the mother of "Into the Arms of Strangers" producer Deborah Oppenheimer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | February 20, 2000
WASHINGTON -- John Frankenheimer is a Class-A director with a 40-plus-year career, four Emmys and a handful of classic motion pictures on his resume. But there was a time when he had lost his confidence. "The phone wasn't ringing, I was begging off on a lot of stuff," the 70-year-old Frankenheimer says, reflecting on a slack period that began in the late '80s and stretched into the early '90s. "I thought that they had written me off." Events would prove, however, that Frankenheimer had -- and doubtless has -- plenty of directing left in him. This week, his latest, "Reindeer Games," opens in theaters throughout the country.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1998
John Frankenheimer doesn't see why more directors haven't split their time between movies and television. He has, with impressive results, including a string of Emmys and a handful of theatrical films that can legitimately be called classics.His latest entry in a career that extends over four decades is "Ronin," a post Cold-War thriller in which Robert De Niro leads a pack of leaderless mercenaries on a cat-and-mouse hunt through the narrow streets of southern France.Filled with the elements for which Frankenheimer has become renowned -- duplicitous spies, shadowy authority figures, intricate plotting -- "Ronin" is further proof that he is one of those rare directors whose work is truly timeless.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1998
You don't know much about these guys. Only that they've got a job to do.John Frankenheimer's "Ronin" doesn't worry much (if at all) about motivation or background or what its characters do when they're not skulking about the soft underbelly of southern France. What it does worry about is the job, and how these guys come together to pull it off.Or not. Because in "Ronin," a masterly tale of intrigue from an old hand at the genre, you're never quite sure who's doing what, who's loyal to whom, whose allegiances lie where.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 23, 1997
TNT's "George Wallace" is one of the most eloquent, lyrical and moving docudramas ever made for television.It is also one of the most troubling. I can't remember a docudrama in the last decade -- and there have been some hot-hot-button ones, such as NBC's "Roe Vs. Wade" -- in which the mix of fact and fiction has left me feeling so uneasy."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 27, 2003
George Axelrod, the screenwriter and sometime director who died Saturday at age 81, had his name on the scripts of several icon-generating movies, including The Seven Year Itch (1955), Bus Stop (1956), and Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). He also produced, directed and wrote the disreputable crazy-comedy classic Lord Love a Duck (1966). But his main claim to posterity is the subversive political suspense film The Manchurian Candidate (1962). It's one of the few "trick" movies that builds in entertainment value even after its tricks are revealed - and even after repeated viewings.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2002
LOS ANGELES - John Frankenheimer, one of the foremost directors of the 1960s with classic films such as The Manchurian Candidate, Seven Days in May, Birdman of Alcatraz and The Train, died of a massive stroke yesterday from complications after spinal surgery. He was 72. Mr. Frankenheimer, whose career stumbled badly in the late 1970s and 1980s because of personal problems and alcoholism, returned in the 1990s with significant television work that was flourishing at the time of his death.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even before its public release, a new Hollywood-made docudrama about former Alabama Gov. George Wallace has generated a mini-controversy about the liberties its maker has taken with the facts.In "George Wallace," by veteran director-producer JohnFrankenheimer, a black convicted murderer named Archie who has become a prison trustee working for Mr. Wallace at the mansion takes an ice pick from a kitchen drawer and contemplates stabbing him, but in the end decides against it.The incident never happened and Frankenheimer acknowledges it. He defends the scene as a dramatic device to convey the anger of black Alabamans toward Mr. Wallace, who at the time was a leader of the cause of racial segregation in the Deep South.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 1, 1991
For many years, John ("Manchurian Candidate") Frankenheimer has been laboring to remove the parenthesis from the middle of his name. Such is the fate of a man who makes his masterpiece too soon as both he and Orson ("Citizen Kane") Welles found out.It is therefore sad to report that he will probably never become known as John ("Year of the Gun") Frankenheimer. His new thriller, set in the year of the Red Brigades horror in Rome (1978), is chaotic and rambunctious but consistently undone by bad actors reading bad dialogue badly amid the explosions and the riots.
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