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Frank Sinatra

FEATURES
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2008
With "Touch My Body" topping Billboard's Hot 100 as of Wednesday, Mariah Carey's career total of No. 1 singles has hit 18, one more than Elvis Presley. You'd think Western civilization had collapsed overnight. My advice? Get over it. I grew up loving Presley's music. I was born the same year he first set foot in Sam Phillips' Sun studio in Memphis, Tenn., and my first memory of music is that of a teenage neighbor belting out "You ain't nothin' but a hound dog!" in 1956, when I was 3. But this brouhaha?
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NEWS
By Adrienne Morris and Adrienne Morris,sun reporter | February 9, 2007
The Columbia Jazz Band is made up of more than 22 volunteer musicians -- professional and amateur -- who share a love of performing the big-band sound. "The interesting thing about the band is that the musicians earn their livings in other ways," said Riley McDonald, 67, a saxophonist. Engineers, teachers, doctors, National Security Agency employees and other professionals meet Mondays to practice and socialize. As one member said, the band has "become like family." The group, which includes musicians ranging from the late 20s to early 80s, is to perform a free concert at 7 p.m. Sunday at Howard County Community College's Smith Theatre.
NEWS
May 20, 2006
Cy Feuer, 95, who with Ernest H. Martin produced some of Broadway's biggest hits including Guys and Dolls and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and the movie version of Cabaret, died Wednesday at his home in new York City. Feuer and Martin -- as they were billed -- had five hit musicals in a row, starting in 1948 with Where's Charley? It was followed by Guys and Dolls (1950), Can-Can (1953), The Boy Friend (1954) and Silk Stockings (1955). Nominated for nine Tonys, Mr. Feuer won three -- one for Guys and Dolls and two for How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2004
This is not an obituary for the Merriweather Post Pavilion. Columbia's woodsy amphitheater - host to every major act (well, not Springsteen or the Stones) - ends its season today with an Incubus concert. We refuse to allow Merriweather to end on that note. The Rouse Co. wants to sell the 37-year-old venue to Howard County as an enclosed theater. Merriweather's management wants the pavilion to remain an open-air venue, and has a contract allowing it to book acts for one more season. But after that, the pavilion's future is up in the air. Its past, however, is rock solid.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Hipp hipp hipp hooray. With spotlights, orchids, champagne and more than a little nostagia, Baltimore last night celebrated the rebirth of its beloved 1914 vaudeville palace, the Hippodrome Theatre. A well-heeled crowd of more than 2,200 plunked down from $250 to $550 apiece to attend the gala opening of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center (which includes the Hippodrome) followed by a performance of The Producers. For many, the celebration was a welcome reminder of the days when Frank Sinatra, Red Skelton and the Three Stooges trod the Hippodrome's stage.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2003
A little bit of Italy rolled through downtown Baltimore yesterday as the city celebrated its 114th consecutive Columbus Day parade with the steady beat of marching bands, floating restaurants, fancy cars and perfect weather. Savoring brilliant sunshine and summerlike temperatures, spectators by the hundreds cheered and clapped as nearly 90 groups walked, marched or drove in the procession from the Washington Monument in Mount Vernon to Central Avenue in Little Italy. "This is the best day we've had in years," said Thomas J. Iacoboni, organizer of the parade culminating several Columbus-themed events that began weeks ago. "The idea is to get people to Little Italy."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | July 10, 2003
NOW OR NEVER Local singer and TV personality Carolyn Black-Sotir stars in The Sweetest Sounds, a Celebration of the Music of Richard Rodgers Sunday at 3 p.m. at Stephens Hall Theatre. The show pays tribute to Rodgers, whose music graced Broadway and the silver screen for six decades, and highlights his collaborations with Lorenz Hart, Oscar Hammerstein III and Stephen Sondheim. The theater is at 8000 York Road on the campus of Towson University. Tickets are $20-$24 and $15 for students.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2002
THE RELAY for Life event sponsored by the American Cancer Society and held last month in Linthicum was a big success. Hundreds of area residents gathered at Lindale Middle School for the overnight event that celebrated cancer survivors and raised money to find a cure. Forty-one teams raised $88,000. "We really thank the Linthicum community for coming out and being so generous for this event," said Susan Bauman Stuart, regional vice president of the American Cancer Society. The event began with a reception for cancer survivors sponsored by North Arundel Hospital, which included welcoming words and details about the hospital's cancer center from Dr. Russell DeLuca, and inspirational words from breast cancer survivor Pat Anastase.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 14, 2002
THE CALENDAR says it's a January weekend in 2002, but inside Giovanni's in Edgewood, things are swingin', baby, and Ike is still the president. Up on the tiny dance floor, with cigarette smoke curling to the ceiling and a bottle of Jack Daniel's resting on a nearby stool, Mickey Light grips a microphone and summons the spirit of Frank Sinatra once more. Oh, he's got it all down: the finger-snapping, the tough-guy swagger, the way he shoots the cuffs on his tux, the Rat Pack patter about booze and broads and breaking legs.
FEATURES
By Alan K. Stout and Alan K. Stout,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 2001
He has won nine Grammy Awards and sung for seven U.S. presidents. He has sold more than 50 million records and is described by the Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll as "the epitome of cool." He is also an accomplished painter, and the United Nations has given him a "Citizen of the World" honor. Old folks love him. Young folks love him. Really, everybody loves him. He is, of course, Tony Bennett. And he is, above and beyond his accomplishments, a true gentleman. He speaks respectfully and thoughtfully of music and of other artists.
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