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Frank Sinatra

FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1995
Happy 80th birthday, Mr. Sinatra.* "Saved by the Light" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Once a young actor of considerable promise, now known primarily as Julia Roberts' older brother, Eric Roberts stars in this story of a disagreeable sort who changes his ways after being struck by lightning and spending 30 minutes clinically dead. In films from "Star 80" to "Runaway Train" to "The Coca-Cola Kid," Mr. Roberts has almost invariably played two characters, either a dangerous creepazoid only one step above pond scum or a guy who attended one too many acting classes.
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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | September 2, 1994
It was once my privilege to be challenged to a public duel by Frank Sinatra.He was upset because I questioned the wasteful assignment of several Chicago cops to guard his hotel suite while he performed this city.In doing so, I made a fleeting reference to what appeared to be his splendid hairpiece.Angered by the suggestion that his tresses had been purchased, he sent a lunk over with a letter in which he called me a pimp and offered to let me pull his hair.The deal was, if the hair moved, he would pay me a large sum of money.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 21, 1991
What does it mean to speak of Frank Sinatra these days?Merely utter the name, and a host of conflicting images crowd in, each one vying with the others to define who the man is. Is he Frankie, the skinny young crooner who drove the bobby-soxers wild? Is he Ol' Blue Eyes, the eternal saloon singer forever awaiting the wee small hours of the morning? Or is he the Chairman of the Board, the self-made music mogul and undisputed ruler of American popular song?To the romantic, he's the essence of a love affair, a man who understands the glory of new love and the agony of heartbreak, and sings about both with a voice smooth as whiskey and just as intoxicating.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 14, 2002
THE CALENDAR says it's a January weekend in 2002, but inside Giovanni's in Edgewood, things are swingin', baby, and Ike is still the president. Up on the tiny dance floor, with cigarette smoke curling to the ceiling and a bottle of Jack Daniel's resting on a nearby stool, Mickey Light grips a microphone and summons the spirit of Frank Sinatra once more. Oh, he's got it all down: the finger-snapping, the tough-guy swagger, the way he shoots the cuffs on his tux, the Rat Pack patter about booze and broads and breaking legs.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 8, 1994
Even if you didn't watch the Grammys show, you heard about it. They gave Sinatra a lifetime achievement award. And in the middle of his rambling acceptance speech, they cut to commercial, like Sinatra was Jerry Vale or somebody.They dissed Frank.A few years ago, Frank would have broken some knees for less. But Frank is 78 now, and he doesn't exactly evoke terror anymore.He does occasionally evoke confusion though. Sometimes, he rambles. Sometimes, he even forgets the words to the songs he defined.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 1998
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. -- John Gennari of the University of Virginia argued that the tough Dolly Sinatra, "a political ward heeler, a saloonkeeper," should be seen in the context of "larger discourses of mother-bashing that pervade American culture." That way, people may gain an understanding of her son that "peels back his tough-guy disguise and reveals, ironically, a nurturing maternal figure."James E. Bruno of the University of California in Los Angeles offered a "Jungian psychological perspective" of the star, exploring his use of "archetypes that tap into the American collective unconscious."
NEWS
By J. D. Considine and By J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 16, 1998
They called him "The Voice." It seemed an unremarkable description -- after all, what singer didn't have a voice? -- until you heard him. Then it all made sense.When he sang, he didn't just deliver the melody but animated it, filled it with passion and power, longing and loneliness. The voice revealed how the singer felt and let listeners share in those emotions. It touched untold lives' and brought him unimagined success.The voice was stilled early Friday morning when Frank Sinatra suffered a heart attack in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1996
It's a good thing nobody ever told Mickey Light that the way to be happy is to just be yourself. Mickey was himself for 55 years and something always seemed to be missing.He got a better deal from life when he started being somebody else. When he started being Frank Sinatra."How many people do you know who just hate to go to work?" he asks. That's the way it used to be with him when he was lugging wire at Bethlehem Steel, or tending bar. But today, as he puts it, "I'm just tickled to death."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Gerard Shields and Story by Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
THE OLD TAILOR DOESN'T HAVE THE heart to throw away the winter coats, suits, summer dresses and trousers left behind by those who abandoned the city. Wrapped in cellophane, the garments hang from a dusty clothes carousel that stopped spinning long ago in his North Eutaw Street shop. The three-piece, pin-striped disco suit, the 1960s Gidget petticoat and the cotton seersucker dresses -- the styles of the clothing reveal when their owners left.Over the past 50 years, Sam Boulmetis watched the downtown shopping crowd thin through the front window of his tailor shop as one out of every three Baltimoreans -- 300,000 in all -- found a ribbon of new highway beckoning them to the suburbs.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1998
HOBOKEN, N.J. - The lyrical loves of his life, Chicago, New York, L.A., can't claim him anymore. Having once lost its native son and "Brightest Star," Hoboken this past weekend brought Francis Albert Sinatra home for good.The town was swinging while in mourning. Just follow the music to the story of how the Mile Square City reclaimed Frank Sinatra - block by block, tune by tune, drink by drink:The stone-cold-serious cab driver at Newark's Penn Station sings along with his lousy radio, as Frank and daughter Nancy croon "Somethin' Stupid."
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